Tenants now prefer a text?

by Nick Thompson

10:18 AM, 13th October 2020
About A week ago

Tenants now prefer a text?

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Tenants now prefer a text?

Using text messages to remind tenants when rent is due and chase late payments provides a range of benefits, according to PayProp who say communicating via text not only saves time and resources, but also meets the needs of modern tenants, many of whom prefer not to receive direct phone calls.

 Why is SMS an effective communication method?

 Communicating with consumers via text message has become popular with companies across all sectors since proving to be more effective than phone calls and emails. According to a report from Mobilesquared, over 99% of all text messages are read by the recipient and approximately 90% are read within three minutes of delivery.

 “When it comes to chasing rent payments, it’s clear text messaging has become one of the most effective methods of communication,” says Neil Cobbold, chief sales officer at PayProp.

 “Traditionally, agents have used letters and phone calls to remind tenants about outstanding payments. However, letters are very easily ignored, while younger generations are less likely to speak on the phone.”

 “Even if tenants delete texts, they are highly likely to read them before they do so. Having the information pop up with urgency can encourage them into action with many renters now using mobile banking to pay their rent, either manually or by standing order.

 Meeting the needs of modern renters

 Recent research has also revealed that SMS messaging is the preferred communication channel for most renters. A survey by bill payment company PayPoint found that 57% of tenants were opposed to direct phone calls, with 62% preferring to receive texts instead.

 According to PayProp’s recent report on the effects of COVID-19 on the UK lettings sector, 91% of tenants who received an e-mail or text message arrears reminder from the platform in August 2020 paid some or all of their debt within seven days.

A record of text messages can further be kept and used as evidence further down the line if required. In the most serious cases, a phone call or in-person meeting may be needed. However, in the first instance, text messaging is an effective way of sending rent reminders.


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Comments

GraemeG

12:07 PM, 13th October 2020
About A week ago

I agree. We setup Whatsapp groups for our HMO tenants and it's beneficial to tenants, ourselves and out property management people. Really helps with building good positive relationships with tenants.

WP

12:23 PM, 13th October 2020
About A week ago

I use every communication known to man just to be able to have proof of everything I send. Major issue with my tenants is they keep changing mobile numbers... Amazing they remember to tell UC but not me...

Old Mrs Landlord

12:29 PM, 13th October 2020
About A week ago

The first sentence of the last paragraph is one of the most powerful reasons for using text messaging. For instance, in one case this enabled us to get at least some payment of LHA in respect of a departing tenant on benefits who left owing rent on a trashed property and claimed to have left our property several weeks before she surrendered the keys to us.

Mick Roberts

13:02 PM, 13th October 2020
About A week ago

Yes,
My Letting Agent who only has a small proportion of my houses with them use PayProp & their automated texts get good results with the tenants.
I refused to use texts for years as phone calls were the way so I thought, quicker to sort out any discrepancies by voice. But alas, approx 7 to 10 years ago, I succumbed, swallowed me pride & boy, has the success rate gone up. It's like the tenant believes that text no matter what happens, what is in that text must be done.
I read a few years ago that Estate Agents got more success response by using Facebook messenger than old fashioned call.
Coupled with the amount of time we waste ringing tenants that don't answer their phone, then they ring u back at 630pm when u in switch off mode.
And yes WP, costs me thousands every year in tenants changing their number.
Mick, you've not done me tiling.
Yes, Builder has been trying to ring u for weeks, phone off.
Oh sorry, I changed me number, here it is.
Below is example of one of my rent texts should anyone wish to extract anything out of it. And before anyone shoots me down, it may not be for u or your tenants, but IT WORKS for my Benefit tenants. And it works for me. And one would think that is what matters.
And if I can help someone that little bit more, why not:
XXXX
Your £675 monthly rent due tomorrow on the 13th of ev month. If bank Hol and weekend, everyone gets paid before.
If Universal Credit UC pay your £625.02 into my bank, then u only have to pay the below.
But the whole £675 rent is your responsibility so have £675 ready as it is your rent.
I have to tell people like this now as when they being switched to Universal Credit UC and UC don't pay, tenants are saying it's not my fault. Rent is tenants responsibility to pay, not Landlords.
As long as UC pay £625.02 every 13th of ev month, £49.98 will be your top up ev month, the same time we get told about your UC payment too, so we can do 1 lot of paperwork and admin instead of 2 separate payments and dates.
Can u set up the day before to pay me on due day tomorrow, so it goes out automatically before 9am, so we can start all rents together at 9am, instead of going back in the banks & the rents systems at separate times.
U must check your journal and £675 rent minus the Housing Element what UC are paying is what you have to pay. As only u can see your journal and know what UC will be paying.
UC pay constantly 1 month + 1 week in arrears.

Seething Landlord

16:27 PM, 13th October 2020
About A week ago

I have never been able to work out how you print, save or backup a text message, which is why I always prefer to use email which most tenants receive on their phones anyway. Can anyone enlighten me?

Mick Roberts

16:50 PM, 13th October 2020
About A week ago

Reply to the comment left by Seething Landlord at 13/10/2020 - 16:27
Get your mates to show u how to screenshot & email it to yourself to save in file or Google photos folder etc.
But drives me nuts trying to save all these proof's for when tenant wants to sue u in 10 years time. We doing more future proofing from being sued than we should be trying to make sure house is ok for tenant.

Seething Landlord

17:16 PM, 13th October 2020
About A week ago

Reply to the comment left by Mick Roberts at 13/10/2020 - 16:50
Thanks Mick 😊
I have managed to copy and email a text to myself, now just have to work out how to to get it date stamped. I'll have to ask my grandchildren I think.

Mick Roberts

17:21 PM, 13th October 2020
About A week ago

Reply to the comment left by Seething Landlord at 13/10/2020 - 17:16
There u go, u got one over me, date stamping. Another thing the judge will have me over on, when me tenants of 25 years can't pay won't leave cause HB not paying enough for 'em, as kids now grown up & left. Years ago I had flats to move 'em into, but no one moving any more, so got tenants for life that gonna' run out of HB entitlement eventually.

I have watched Judge Rinder ha ha & he don't seem to bother with date stamping when looking at texts evidence. Bet he would if against a Landlord though.

Gunga Din

17:33 PM, 13th October 2020
About A week ago

I use a phone app called SMS Backup and Restore. Others are available....

Mick Roberts

17:35 PM, 13th October 2020
About A week ago

Reply to the comment left by Gunga Din at 13/10/2020 - 17:33
I've got that, but that would be hard to find the exact text from let's say 10 years ago would it? Got about 6000 texts in mine.

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