Damage caused by leak from neighbouring flat

by Readers Question

14:51 PM, 21st October 2013
About 5 years ago

Damage caused by leak from neighbouring flat

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Damage caused by leak from neighbouring flat

My tenants reported a very serious leak from the water cylinder to my letting agents, who called in my plumber, who could find no trace of a leak from the water cylinder.

When my tenants got home from work they found the next door neighbours pulling up carpets following a bad leak from their boiler (I had my tenant’s leaking boiler replaced not long ago). The neighbours’ letting agents are sending them a contractor to suck up all the moisture. Damage caused by leak from neighbouring flat

My agents say we can then assess if there is any lasting damage and make a claim on the buildings insurance.

I don’t think this can be right, as the building insurance is with the maintenance company and covers external, not internal problems.

Am I right in thinking that any claim I need to make should be against the neighbouring landlord’s policy?

Thoughts and advice appreciated.

Thanks

Christine



Comments

Joe Bloggs

14:59 PM, 21st October 2013
About 5 years ago

i think you need to read your insurance policy!
'I don’t think this can be right, as the building insurance is with the maintenance company and covers external, not internal problems.'
makes no sense.

Paul Willetts

15:01 PM, 21st October 2013
About 5 years ago

Hi Christine, I would give the leasehold maintenance company a call and discuss with them. (Ie what is covered etc) This happened to me a few months ago. (Leak from flat above mine) the landlord of the flat above called a plumber who repaired the cause. I then called the maintenance company who arranged for payment to be sent directly to me after I had a plasterer replace my ceiling!
Good luck,
Regards
Paul

Chris Hills

15:32 PM, 21st October 2013
About 5 years ago

Hi Christine,

In my experience the buildings insurance will not pay for the repair to the leak but may cover damage to the building structure caused by the leak (whether inside or out, within a flat or common areas). This can include ceilings, floors and decoration in most cases I have dealt with. It won't, I think, deal with your personal belongings which may have been damaged. This should be the remit of your contents/landlords insurance.

I would strongly suggest you contact your block manager to ensure they lodge a claim with the buildings insurers, just to make sure your are "in the system" and they can't say the claim wasn't lodged in reasonable time.

Chris

Rob

15:33 PM, 21st October 2013
About 5 years ago

I've had this several times, flats upstairs leaking into me. It is covered by the building insurance arranged by the management company.

Annette Stone

18:00 PM, 21st October 2013
About 5 years ago

I cannot see how a leak from the next door neighbour is affecting you unless their boiler is on a shared wall and the leak has caused water to run down your wall and cause damage. I would discuss this with the block managing agent who probably deals with insurance claims and ask them to investigate. Ask them to lodge a claim for damage to your flat in the meantime and if you have damaged furniture, carpets etc then notify your contents' insurance.

Joe Bloggs

18:48 PM, 21st October 2013
About 5 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Annette Stone" at "21/10/2013 - 18:00":

HI Annette
it can quite easily if the floor is of concrete. water from an adjacent flat can spread laterally across the relatively impervious concrete.

Annette Stone

19:05 PM, 21st October 2013
About 5 years ago

Joe. I was responding to the questioner and the boiler (most likely to be a wall boiler) would need to leak down the wall to affect the floor. If it was a floor boiler that's a different issue.

Joe Bloggs

19:11 PM, 21st October 2013
About 5 years ago

annette
prob not most likely a wall boiler as the question refers to a (hot) water cylinder; these are usually floor mounted. even if the leak was on a wall, water would run down the floor and spread laterally if concrete. either way water will run onto the floor due to gravity and spread laterally on concrete.

Annette Stone

21:22 PM, 21st October 2013
About 5 years ago

No one is doubting that the water can travel. I am saying the questioner needs to know from where so the managing agents can assess liability and whether or not this is an insurance claim as even inside a flat most buildings' insurance covers sudden escape of water from a fixed appliance such as a water heater or boiler. The questioner's first port of call should be the managing agent

Joe Bloggs

22:34 PM, 21st October 2013
About 5 years ago

hi annette
i was answering your incorrect doubt:
'I cannot see how a leak from the next door neighbour is affecting you unless their boiler is on a shared wall and the leak has caused water to run down your wall and cause damage.'
as stated, it can without being on the party wall!

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