New Decent Homes Standard proposed for the PRS

New Decent Homes Standard proposed for the PRS

11:06 AM, 2nd September 2022, About a month ago 23

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The government has unveiled a consultation for a new Decent Homes Standard for the private rented sector – and it could be the biggest shake-up for landlords in 30 years.

This is the first time that a standard has been put forward for the sector and the government wants to hear the views from landlords, tenants, housing groups and councils.

The proposal is part of the government’s new deal for renters to make homes safe and secure.

And, they point out, that millions of renters could benefit from a set of improved standards for rented homes – though they also highlight that the majority of landlords in the PRS already meet high standards but a minority are failing to meet these.

Privately rented homes should be in a good state of repair

The consultation asks whether privately rented homes should be required to be kept in a good state of repair with efficient heating, suitable facilities and free from serious hazards like major damp or fire risks.

The government is now seeking views on whether such new standards should be introduced and how they should be enforced.

It claims that ‘more than a fifth of the 4.4 million privately rented homes in England are in poor condition’.

And today’s move shows, the government says, that it is getting on with delivering its levelling up mission, to halve the number of poor-quality rented homes by 2030.

‘Homes that are not of decent standard’

Greg Clark, the housing secretary, said: “I want to see a thriving private rented sector, but that does not mean that tenants should have to suffer homes that are not of a decent standard.

“This consultation asks what the minimum standard for privately rented homes should be.”

The social housing sector has been subject to a decent homes standard since 2001 and over the last decade, poor quality social housing has reduced by over a third.

The introduction of a Decent Homes Standard in the private rented sector was outlined in the government’s fairer private rented sector white paper.

‘Extend the Decent Homes Standard to private rented homes’

Alicia Kennedy, the director of Generation Rent, said: “We welcome these plans to extend the Decent Homes Standard to private rented homes.

“As the private rented sector has grown to overtake the social sector in size, not enough action has been taken on the poorer conditions private tenants must put up with.

“Private rented homes are more costly to heat and at a higher risk of disrepair and damp problems.”

She added: “There is no reason why private tenants should expect a worse service than social tenants.

“This crucial measure will help tenants get value for money, whoever they rent from, and stop landlords from profiting by cutting corners.”

The consultation will run for six weeks and seeks views from tenants, landlords, and others in the sector.



Comments

NewYorkie View Profile

11:35 AM, 2nd September 2022, About a month ago

Yet another consultation, with a predictable outcome!

'The government is now seeking views on whether such new standards should be introduced and how they should be enforced.'

What's the point, when there are 150+ rules and regulations already in place for the benefit of tenants in the PRS. The reason there are still rogue landlords is because councils don't or won't enforce those rules.

Judith Wordsworth

11:43 AM, 2nd September 2022, About a month ago

I would have thought from media coverage that social housing stock is in a greater disrepair than the regulated PRS.
I would be very interested to know how many MP’s have left the PRS since 2018.

John MacAlevey

11:44 AM, 2nd September 2022, About a month ago

“I want to see a thriving private rented sector, but that does not mean that tenants should have to suffer homes that are not of a decent standard."

HMG & unknown-man are doing their level best to acheive a totally destroyed PRS.

DSR

11:52 AM, 2nd September 2022, About a month ago

why should there ANY difference in the standard of a home according to who owns it?

Lets just get back to basics here and have one rule that applies to everyone! Proper 'levelling up' !

Ashleigh

12:07 PM, 2nd September 2022, About a month ago

Once again the focus is on the minority of landlords and their bad behaviour. When are they going to realise that if they don’t stop this relentless barrage on the majority of good landlords, there isn’t going to be any left! Many landlords have already sold up and left the sector and this is now showing in the dire shortage of rental homes and the ever increasing rents.

Luke P

12:23 PM, 2nd September 2022, About a month ago

SRS is worse than PRS and if they truly want parity, then there’d be a lot more legislation heading the SRS’s way…!

Dennis Leverett

13:28 PM, 2nd September 2022, About a month ago

“I want to see a thriving private rented sector, but that does not mean that tenants should have to suffer homes that are not of a decent standard".

Then why are you and your chummies trying so hard to destroy the PRS, there won't be a PRS soon apart from the rogues.

You need to scrap everything done so far and start again making it a fair system for Landlords and Tenants. We may then invest more money rather than leave and provide more homes so desperately needed.

13:53 PM, 2nd September 2022, About a month ago

Why oh why are the government meddling in this so much. In general social housing are in much worse condition and should apply to the same standards at same time.
It was the 90's that the PRS pumped their cash repurposing old derelict flats above shops to make affordable starter accomodation. Being often single brick and old they were never going to appeal to families, but provided great cheap accomodation.
The properties aren't always worth enough to throw large cash injections to improve them to a high standard.
I rented 5 properties in my 20s before buying, and all were not great in quality but they were cheap and meant I could live with my partner and save for a deposit and I was grateful.
This will just end up raising rents and more lack of supply, and no cheap end prooerties available for those that syruggle to afford market rates and see many old flats taken out of service.
Damp issues are often caused by tenants not willing to both heat and ventilate their property especially on single brick flats.
No doubt the landlords will be subsidising inspectors and if a landlord cannot afford the enforced improvements then will they have the right to evict, sell, and call it a day as a landlord..I doubt it...

Paul Essex View Profile

16:01 PM, 2nd September 2022, About a month ago

My real concern here is that the 'standard' here seems to mix essentials such as gas safety with 'nice to have ' e.g. a kitchen less than 10 years old!

My kitchen at home is 20 years old and still looks great. If it was in one of my rental homes would a tenant be allowed to trash it without comeback in future (we already have this issue with floor coverings, a tenants visitors dog tore up a corner in a kitchen, despite the rest of the floor being immaculate the DPS judged that it was over 7 years old so no deduction allowed).

Gromit

7:49 AM, 3rd September 2022, About a month ago

Reply to the comment left by Ashleigh at 02/09/2022 - 12:07
That's their objective!

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