Should Landlords wear body cameras?

by Readers Question

11:15 AM, 26th November 2018
About 2 weeks ago

Should Landlords wear body cameras?

Make Text Bigger
Should Landlords wear body cameras?

Following on from my 5½ year legal case I have invested in a Body Worn Camera at a cost of £75.00.

I suggest a Body Worn Video is very necessary these days for Landlords. Police Officers have BWV and always say as they arrive “I have my Body Worn Camera switched on is that alright?” Hence I shall say that.

There is “Corroborative Evidence” of what actions or conversations took place.

Very recently I have had a tenant say that I told him to have new carpets fitted throughout the house and I would pay for them! Well I never said anything of the sort! Absolute rubbish! However, we now have the situation of the tenant saying one thing and the landlord something else.

With a BWV there is absolutely no doubt about what was said and it can be relied upon if the matter proceeds to Court.

I have to be particularly concerned about female staff in Letting Agencies I use. There have been threats to staff and a BWV is an essential piece of kit these days in my view.

Fergus Wilson



Comments

Neil Patterson

11:56 AM, 26th November 2018
About 2 weeks ago

I get it from a safety and record of conversation perspective.

However, we have had articles on the complications of fixed CCTV. I can imagine body cameras would be even trickier to confirm permission and to justify the record keeping to the ICO for GDPR purposes and storage.

Darren Peters

9:13 AM, 27th November 2018
About 2 weeks ago

How much of a faff is it keeping years' of video evidence with bodycams? Typically tenants wouldn't say, "landlord said....", about something for several months. That said, the deterrent element would probably prevent a lot of disputes in the first place.

NEIL T

10:00 AM, 27th November 2018
About 2 weeks ago

"I have had a tenant say that I told him to have new carpets fitted throughout the house and I would pay for them!"
I never ever take instructions verbally, I make it quite clear from the off that all comms are to be made by email, text or snail mail with the exception of fire or flood. That way the telephone rarely rings and any requests are documented and responded to in writing so there can be no argument.
If my tenant was a good one and the request for new carpets was reasonable then I'd probably supply, fit and pay for them - all confirmed in writing of course.
As for the camera, I see no real benefit, but I have on occasion put my mobile on record when visiting tenants/solicitor/building inspector simply to give me something to refer back to, purely for my own benefit.

Luke P

10:58 AM, 27th November 2018
About 2 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by neilt at 27/11/2018 - 10:00
But the problem comes if they've fitted them and just *say* that you said to go ahead and you'd pay. The Judge may believe them, despite your insistence that you only ever do such requests in writing. I think that was Fergus' point.

MasterG

11:03 AM, 27th November 2018
About 2 weeks ago

“I have my Body Worn Camera switched on is that alright?” Hence I shall say that." What if the tenant answers "No"? Also, although it would show what was said in one conversation, it's no proof that something else wasn't stated in another. The tenant could simply say "that conversation wasn't recorded" or claim that you have chosen not to provide footage of the 'other' conversation. Always get things confirmed in writing.

Rob Crawford

13:04 PM, 27th November 2018
About 2 weeks ago

I would only wear one during special occasions such as serving possession notices to provide evidence of posting. It's important in this instance that you can demonstrate a seamless video that shows the content of the letter, putting the letter in the envelope and posting it at the right address. Otherwise I suspect it would not be well received by tenants. To record every verbal communication - get real. I guess it depends on the type of tenant sector that you serve.

Michael Barnes

22:43 PM, 27th November 2018
About 2 weeks ago

I always email after a visit saying "this is what was discussed/agreed; email back confirming your agreement or identifying errors and omissions."

Winsome P

9:20 AM, 29th November 2018
About 2 weeks ago

I wish I had got one when I went to expect a party house with very troublesome parents and badly behaved kids 5 boys and one girl. The professional COuncil inventory clerk refused to attend the checking out despite being at the check in. Instead a pub landlord was sent who never saw the house on check in. The lawyer parents worked in assisting council tenants. I never got past the kitchen after pointing out the dirty oven, chandelier, behind the dishwasher, dryer, washing machine, greased up blinds, greasy and unchanged extractor hood and filters before the parent threatened me and backed me into a corner of the kitchen whilst the other 5 tenants stood round. Capped off by opening a cupboard and having their B&Q half empty 10litre magnolia paint fall down from 6ft high onto the floor over my trousers and shoes. I left and had to buy new trousers. When I returned there were two buckets catching water in the lounge and the sods had overflowed the bath. Thereupon I recorded but by then they were recording me as a pissed off landlord and gave selected footage to the deposit disputes service. I should of gone in with my iphone on video in a top pocket the first time . . . . needless to say the parents and students screwed me despite 5GB of high resolution photos of before and after

Monty Bodkin

10:05 AM, 29th November 2018
About 2 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by Winsome P at 29/11/2018 - 09:20
Why did you give them a tenancy in the first place?
More alarm bells there than in a fire station.

Mike

12:07 PM, 1st December 2018
About 2 weeks ago

Winsome P, destroying or damaging property is a criminal matter, should have called the police, though you may have to say that you are being threatened, I don't think you would get very far if you chucked a bucket of paint on anyone or on any public place. Try and throw paint over some statue in London, see how far you could walk away before being handcuffed and in custody to appear in a magistrates Court the next day.

1 2

Leave Comments

Please Log-In OR Become a member to reply to comments or subscribe to new comment notifications.

Forgotten your password?

OR

BECOME A MEMBER

Variation of lease to rectify adverse possession?

The Landlords Union

Become a Member, it's FREE

Our mission is to facilitate the sharing of best practice amongst UK landlords, tenants and letting agents

Learn More