Landlords to get powers to evict anti-social tenants

Landlords to get powers to evict anti-social tenants

9:56 AM, 27th March 2023, About 11 months ago 25

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The government has unveiled plans to give landlords and housing associations the power to evict anti-social tenants who ruin their neighbours’ lives by being drunk and disorderly and persistently noisy.

The move follows Prime Minister Rishi Sunak’s pledge earlier this year to clamp down on anti-social behaviour and he says it be treated with the urgency it deserves.

The government says there will be a ‘zero-tolerance approach’ to all forms of anti-social behaviour and give the police and local authorities the tools they need to tackle the problem.

‘Undermines the basic right of people to feel safe’

Mr Sunak said: “Anti-social behaviour undermines the basic right of people to feel safe in the place they call home.

“The public have rightly had enough – which is why I am determined to restore people’s confidence that those responsible will be quickly and visibly punished.

“This action plan maps out how we will tackle this issue with the urgency it deserves and stamp out these crimes once and for all – so that wherever you live, you can feel safe in, and proud of your community.”

‘Anti-social tenants blight the lives of fellow renters’

The government announcement follows extensive campaigning by the National Residential Landlords’ Association (NRLA) and its chief executive, Ben Beadle, said: “Anti-social tenants blight the lives of fellow renters and their neighbours.

“Plans to end ‘no explanation’ repossessions risk making it harder to tackle such behaviour.”

He added: “Whilst we will study the detail of the government’s plans carefully, we welcome its commitment to strengthen the ability of landlords to evict unruly tenants.

“It follows extensive campaigning by the NRLA to ensure swift and effective action can be taken against those causing misery in their communities.

“The law must be on the side of the victims of anti-social behaviour, and we are glad that the Government agrees.”

Repossess a property because of a tenant’s anti-social or criminal behaviour

Polling by the NRLA has found that 50% of landlords have at some point attempted to repossess a property because of a tenant’s anti-social or criminal behaviour.

Of this group, 84% say they had received no help in tackling it from their local authority and 75% had no assistance from the police in dealing with anti-social tenants.


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Comments

paul thomason

12:09 PM, 27th March 2023, About 11 months ago

At least some good news

andrew.jones@apt-icc.co.uk

12:13 PM, 27th March 2023, About 11 months ago

About time however lets see how far gov goes more words least action expected, kick the can down the road

Jo Westlake

12:27 PM, 27th March 2023, About 11 months ago

Being able to evict for ASB is theoretically great, if we can get enough evidence, if we can get a court hearing, if the judge doesn't decide there's nothing wrong with their behaviour, if we can get a bailiff but where are they going to go?
Are they just going to move into another street and make their new neighbours lives hell?

Paul Essex

12:53 PM, 27th March 2023, About 11 months ago

Frankly I just don't believe it. This is just a smoke screen against landlords asking to retain Section 21 to deal with ASB

Alexander Henry

12:58 PM, 27th March 2023, About 11 months ago

This assumes that the landlord cares about his anti-social tenants. If he doesn't live in the area and he's getting rent, what's it to him? It is also people other than the landlord who are affected by noise and drug dealing that need powers.

northern landlord

12:58 PM, 27th March 2023, About 11 months ago

Landlords can already evict for antisocial behaviour as long as it can be proved in court but getting proof can be difficult in many cases, this is why landlords mostly use Section 21 as a back stop. Is Rishi planning to remove the burden of proof from a section 8 eviction for antisocial behaviour? I don’t think so. What are these new powers for landlord exactly? Pretty much zilch in reality I expect.

Rod

13:24 PM, 27th March 2023, About 11 months ago

iHowz cautiously welcome any progress on dealing with antisocial behaviour, in particular, measures to support speedy eviction of those who show no interest in changing behaviour and blight the lives of fellow tenants and their neighbours.

iHowz believe that progress on strengthening S8 grounds, along with improvements in the court process, including antisocial behaviour, need to be prioritised.

Until these measures have been agreed, enacted and ruled on by the courts, removal of S21 would be premature.

We recognise that S21 has been overused and that it penalises tenants with a good history over many years, and have been urging Government to consider our amendment to make S21 fairer for these tenants, while retaining the safety net of S21 for landlords to recover their properties.

https://ihowz.uk/the-unintended-consequences-of-losing-the-section-21-notice/

Seething Landlord

13:53 PM, 27th March 2023, About 11 months ago

Reply to the comment left by northern landlord at 27/03/2023 - 12:58
“This action plan maps out how we will tackle this issue with the urgency it deserves and stamp out these CRIMES once and for all – so that wherever you live, you can feel safe in, and proud of your community.”

The use of the word "crimes" raises doubts about the effectiveness of the proposed measures. Does the PM understand that criminal responsibility needs to be proved beyond reasonable doubt? Who is going to gather the evidence and from whom?

It is all very well giving police and Local Authorities tools but are they really going to use them when they are already overstretched? Additional ring fenced funding and manpower for them and the Courts? Believe that and you'll believe anything.

Where is the incentive for LAs to increase homelessness? These are the same people who insist that tenants respond to S21 notices by sitting it out to the bitter end. A classic example of a conflict of interests if they are mandated to assist with eviction of nuisance tenants, who will often be families with unruly children or others whom they will then have a duty to re-house.

Forgive my scepticism.

Julesgflawyer

16:52 PM, 27th March 2023, About 11 months ago

Reply to the comment left by northern landlord at 27/03/2023 - 12:58
Ground 14 is discretionary. Maybe the plan is to make it mandatory....

northern landlord

16:58 PM, 27th March 2023, About 11 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Julesgflawyer at 27/03/2023 - 16:52
Maybe, would be good but I doubt it somehow. At the moment the only proposed new mandatory ground is for persistent rent arrears to get around the situation where a tenant has some bouts of rent arrears but always pays up before court.

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