Robert Jenrick extends the ban on bailiff evictions until 21st February

by Readers Question

13:50 PM, 8th January 2021
About 3 weeks ago

Robert Jenrick extends the ban on bailiff evictions until 21st February

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Robert Jenrick extends the ban on bailiff evictions until 21st February

The Communities Secretary, Robert Jenrick,  has announced renters will continue to be supported during the new national restrictions, with an extension to the ban on bailiff evictions for all but the most egregious cases until at least 21 February with measures kept under review.

Communities Secretary, Rt Hon Robert Jenrick MP said:  “We are also extending the ban on bailiff evictions helping to protect the most vulnerable renters.”

Court rules and procedures introduced in September to support both tenants and landlords will remain in place and regularly reviewed. The courts will continue to prioritise cases, such as those involving anti-social behaviour, illegal occupation and perpetrators of domestic abuse in the social sector.

Landlords continue to be required to give 6-month notice periods to tenants until at least 31 March except in the most serious circumstances.

Ben Beadle, Chief Executive of the National Residential Landlords Association said: “The repossessions ban is a sticking plaster that will ultimately lead to more people losing their homes. It means tenants’ debts will continue to mount to the point where they have no hope of paying them off leading eventually to them having to leave their home.

“Instead the Government should recognise the crisis facing many tenants and take immediate action to enable them to pay their debts as is happening in Scotland and Wales. The objective should be to sustain tenancies in the long term and not just the short term.”


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Comments

Hardworking Landlord

15:36 PM, 8th January 2021
About 3 weeks ago

FFS!

RL

10:17 AM, 9th January 2021
About 3 weeks ago

So if I have a possession hearing on 2nd Feb does this mean that

1. an eviction date can still be given by the Judge but the actual service of this can't take place until after the 21 Feb
OR
2. an eviction date can't be set by the Judge at all?
OR
3. An eviction date can be given by the judge, a date before 21 Feb could be set BUT I can't instigate bailiffs until after this date??
I am presuming that by definition of having been granted a hearing (S8 & S21 pleased for mix of rent arrears and serious ASBO in relation to continual and ongoing damage to property) the claim has been deemed urgent enough for the case to be heard, so if this is the case then the eviction should not be held up any further (Orders were served in Nov 2019)

steve p

13:36 PM, 9th January 2021
About 3 weeks ago

I think this sums up the anti landlord sentiment that has been so prevalent for some years now.

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/eviction-ban-loophole-substantial-arrears-six-months-b1784836.html

Headline of cruel new loophole. If the tenant is more than 'just' six months in rent arrears. 6 months is likely to be thousands of pounds. Given the amount of time it will take to get through the courts and get eviction this will take certainly at least another 6 months if the process is started now.

John Mac

13:57 PM, 11th January 2021
About 2 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by RL at 09/01/2021 - 10:17
The ASBO clause requires that the Tenant has been convicted.

Steve Masters

14:24 PM, 11th January 2021
About 2 weeks ago

Retailers are still empowered to prevent shoppers from walking out without paying for food yet landlords are denied the right to enforce payment of rent. And arguably food is more important in sustaining life than housing.

What other sector is denied the power to collect what is rightfully due?

Could you imagine if the government allowed shoppers to walk out without paying!

Pubs and restaurants are all closed and denied the ability to trade and make profit. But housing landlords are forced to stay open and provide the service and goods for their customers that rent is supposed to pay for.

It's as if pubs and restaurants where forced to stay open and serve their customers but prevented from collecting the bill at the end of the evening.

Absurd!

If housing is so important the government should be doing more to help tenants, like setting up some sort of rent loan scheme.

TheBiggerPicture

14:35 PM, 11th January 2021
About 2 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by Steve Masters at 11/01/2021 - 14:24
That's the next step, along with negative interest rates and unlimited debt! Enough to make Corbyn blush!

Housing Law

14:44 PM, 11th January 2021
About 2 weeks ago

Judges do not set eviction dates - they make or do not make possession orders. You apply to a Court for a "warrant of possession" which is an administrative permission granted by the Court to allow the Bailiff to set a date for the eviction. The effect of ban is that the Bailiff's office cannot set an eviction date prior to 21.02.21 unless one of the limited exceptions apply. Those exceptions have been amended so that in relation to rent arrears there is no longer a requirement for 9 months' pre-covid rent arrears, but rather 6 months' rent accrued at any time. The Government's policy of restricting possession claims/enforcement is based on shifting the responsibility in provision/cost of housing from the public to the private housing sector. This in turn is because there is insufficient social housing to deal with the numbers of people that would otherwise be evicted.

Steve Masters

17:07 PM, 11th January 2021
About 2 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by Housing Law at 11/01/2021 - 14:44
Eviction bans, rent controls, landlord taxes, fees, rules and regulations are not the answer. The answer to the housing crisis is much simpler and more effective than that.

We need to *** BUILD MORE HOUSES ***

The aftermath of covid and brexit will lead to consumer caution, which will hurt the economy which will lead to more job losses which will lead to more poverty which will lead to more consumer caution. And down and down it goes to poverty.

Building of lots more new houses could lead to full employment and full housing which would lead to more consumer confidence which would lead to more spending. And up and up it goes to prosperity.

So, to recap, we need to
BUILD MORE HOUSES, then we can
BUILD MORE HOUSES, then we can
BUILD EVEN MORE HOUSES

Dylan Morris

21:29 PM, 11th January 2021
About 2 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by Steve Masters at 11/01/2021 - 17:07
Until the U.K. is concreted over from John O’Groats to Lands End.


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