EICR – Consumer Unit installed by unqualified electrician?

EICR – Consumer Unit installed by unqualified electrician?

9:47 AM, 24th November 2020, About 11 months ago 19

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I hired an electrician to do an EICR who found the Consumer Unit needed to be replaced. I then gave the job to him to complete.

However, after the job was completed, it turned out he isn’t qualified to register the installation with Building Control at the local council, so called Part P Certificate (Building Regulations Compliance Certificate), which is required by law for a noticeable change such as a new consumer unit.

I initially agreed to pay him £500, which isn’t a low price, but at the high end for such a job if anything.

What’s my best approach here?

Should I pay him? Should I move to another qualified electrician to re-do the job?

Mike



Comments

by Gary Arnold

10:14 AM, 24th November 2020, About 11 months ago

I am a retired qualified electrician, I do not do even any work on my properties that require Part-P certification or even the condition reports needed now under the new regulations.
Do not pay him at this stage he shouldn't have fitted it for you, firstly see if you can get him to arrange a 3rd party certification for the installation, but I suspect he wont find anyone to take that on after the event! Failing that contact building control yourself and see what they advise, it is likely they will ask you to find an electrician to certify it at your cost, again unlikely!
I think probably your only option is to arrange a Part-P certified electrician to redo the work and a lesson learned to the other guy!! Do not leave this as this is not legal and I suspect would affect your insurance should you have a problem!

by DGM

11:12 AM, 24th November 2020, About 11 months ago

The onus is on the electrician to get the work certified by a Part P registered competent person. A non registered person can undertake the work, but needs a 3rd party to certify.

Below is from https://www.electricalsafetyfirst.org.uk/find-an-electrician/building-regulations/england/
From April 2014 you will also be able to employ a non-registered electrical installer who has appointed a registered third party certifier to carry out the required inspection and testing of the work both during and on completion.

I carry out all my own work and get it certified, but although not a trained (past exam) I have been carrying out cabling electrical, data, fibre for over 20 years and I do to a higher standard than most electricians. The person that certifies my work, knows I do a good above standards job.

by Ararat

11:26 AM, 24th November 2020, About 11 months ago

it is not illegal to do the work, a close look at the regs say it is actually the customers responsibility to get it tested. !!! Yes, usually the electrician is registered on an approved electrician scheme and will include testing, but it is not a legal requirement (unlike gas, where you have to be registered to even do the job) The Part P Building Regulations fell short of that requirement, and allow third-party certification. Not common, but not illegal. Again, he can also test and produce a certificate, just that Building Control would not accept if not on an approved scheme. A minefield!

by Ararat

12:27 PM, 24th November 2020, About 11 months ago

Reply to the comment left by DGM at 24/11/2020 - 11:12
Responsibility is customer actually, not the electrician. Needless to say few customers bother after the job is done, just happy to get it done cheaper. Only possibly becomes a problem if house is being sold later, but in my experience very few solicitors actually check to see if there is a Building Control registration for the consumer unit. The purchasers solicitor would probably not even know that the consumer unit had been changed. Personally, i wish an Electrical Condition Report was a requirement for house insurance, but doubt if that will ever happen.

by DGM

12:34 PM, 24th November 2020, About 11 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Adrian Atkins at 24/11/2020 - 12:27
Sorry I should have been more concise in my response.
Mike "Asked should I pay him"
My response was to that, if the electrician that did the work wants to be paid then, as he knows a certificate is required the onus is on him to get the certificate. If the owner (as you say is ultimately responsible) needs to obtain the certificate, the cost should come out of the £500 and pay the balance to the electrician.
The lesson here is to ask exactly what you get in writing and ensure any compliance is provided in whatever works you get contractors to do.

by AlanR

14:00 PM, 24th November 2020, About 11 months ago

Only use NAPIT or NICEIC registered electricians for EICRs. However, not all registered electricians have the correct competency for domestic electrical inspections. On the NICEIC or NAPIT websites you can get advice, identify a suitable electrician local to you and ensure he has the right competency. For a NAPIT electrician, I believe it should be EIS domestic.

by Graham Bowcock

12:13 PM, 25th November 2020, About 11 months ago

Unless the contractor can get you a certificate, he needs a rocket up his backside and no you shouldn't pay. He hasn't provided you with what you need, legally.

Some unqualified electricians have a relationship with one who is so that they can issue certificates (it begs two questions, though if they can do the work properly why don't they get qualified?, and secondly why use them in the first place?).

He needs to have the riot act read to him if he's doing work that he doesn't understand. I had it with a plumber who was trying to fit a boiler, but wasn't GasSafe; he was going to get his "mate" to issue a certificate. Not in one of my properties!

You may feel inclined to pay for materials that are suitable for use, such as the consumer unit.

by Jontyv

16:16 PM, 25th November 2020, About 11 months ago

Reply to the comment left by AlanR at 24/11/2020 - 14:00
Please don't miss out Elecsa registered electricians!

by Paul landlord

20:23 PM, 25th November 2020, About 11 months ago

Reply to the comment left by AlanR at 24/11/2020 - 14:00Why single out just two particular UKAS approved schemes out of the half dozen that are out there- all the schemes are UKAS approved and equal. You on commission or something? What have you got against other government approved and registered electricians?
Always concerns me when keyboard warriors boom with a loud voice alluding to some superior knowledge when actually they dont actuallyhave it..
Unfortunately this behemoth undermines the legitimate and knowledgable advice givers on here and other forums.
Registered electrician of 9 years speaking here by the way and sick of these sparky threads where certain people clearly illustrate they dont really have a clue

by Paul landlord

20:24 PM, 25th November 2020, About 11 months ago

Why single out just two particular UKAS approved schemes out of the half dozen that are out there- all the schemes are UKAS approved and equal. You on commission or something? What have you got against other government approved and registered electricians?
Always concerns me when keyboard warriors boom with a loud voice alluding to some superior knowledge when actually they dont.
Unfortunately this behaviour undermines the legitimate and knowledgable advice givers on here and other forums.
Registered electrician of 9 years speaking here by the way and sick of these sparky threads where certain people clearly illustrate they dont really have a clue

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