What’s the best form of electric heating for rental flat?

What’s the best form of electric heating for rental flat?

9:42 AM, 19th July 2021, About 3 months ago 36

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With gas heating under pressure from future government green legislation for residential properties, and potential bans for the installation of new gas boilers, is this heating fuel now falling out of favour and not the way forward?

The question is at this early stage what is the best form of electric heating available and is reasonably priced and economical enough to run for a rental property.

Any help or experience with electrical heating advice would be greatly appreciated.

Many thanks

Sati



Comments

by Sue Marven

10:52 AM, 19th July 2021, About 3 months ago

Im very interested to hear other peoples advice as I have electric heating on economy 7 and it’s so expensive.

by DGM

11:04 AM, 19th July 2021, About 3 months ago

For two flats I have refurbed which are electric only I used a version of these https://www.bestelectricradiators.co.uk/c/electric-radiators/
There are efficient and fully controllable, where you can set a minimum temp, my tenants have not complained about them.

by reader

11:58 AM, 19th July 2021, About 3 months ago

Dear Sati,

Speak to your EPC assessor who will be able to advise you on the most suitable for the property. Each assessor has within their software a list of approved high efficientcy appliances. You can select from the list or select your own and ask them ask them as to the impact the radiators will have on the property. You can then do your cost benefit calculation.

I have a good working relationship with my EPC adviser and we work together with redesigning the heating specifications of refurbishments.

Please do remember the government are also trying to raise the minimum EPC rating from an E up to a C. So think long term.

by Dennis Leverett

13:17 PM, 19th July 2021, About 3 months ago

Reply to the comment left by at 19/07/2021 - 11:58
Just out of interest, my own bungalow has solar panels on the roof which are ideally placed for maximum effect. We actually produce more electricity than we use because the bungalow is very efficient with LED lights, insulation etc. Does this effect the EPC because electricity wise we are carbon neutral and less ?.

by Christopher Rogal

13:20 PM, 19th July 2021, About 3 months ago

Reply to the comment left by DGM at 19/07/2021 - 11:04
Electricity is efficient, in the sense that the energy that's metered is fully converted to heat. The problem is the very high cost of electricity per KWh, compared to gas.

by Christopher Rogal

13:42 PM, 19th July 2021, About 3 months ago

Reply to the comment left by at 19/07/2021 - 11:58
This is a problematic area. An EPC assessor will tell you (at least mine did) that gas heating will earn you a considerably higher EPC rating than electric heating will. I still convert to gas where I reasonably can.

I have mostly gas systems. None of my electrically-heated flats (which are in Victorian houses) are likely to reach a C rating without large investment. I suspect thousands of rental properties will be sold and tenants lose their homes.

An EPC target of D may be deemed more realistic once the government looks at this in more detail.

Underlying all this is the fact that electricity is very expensive, compared to gas.

by silversurfer2017

13:54 PM, 19th July 2021, About 3 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Dennis Leverett at 19/07/2021 - 13:17Our house has solar panels, 3.6 KW on roof and our recent EPC was B with a number of 87. Solar panels are definitely taken onto account. IMO there are some factors are not taken in to account which perhaps should be. We own a flat which has only one external wall and all the windows are on this wall. This wall faces due south and the heating bills are very low due to solar gain. EPC assessor said It would have made no difference to the rating if our flat had faced due north??

by No hate plz

16:00 PM, 19th July 2021, About 3 months ago

It would be a heat pump, running cost is a little less than gas & the carbon benefit is massive. The only downsides are the high install cost, the outdoor unit, and that for some reason people don't like them.

by Dennis Leverett

16:38 PM, 19th July 2021, About 3 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Collin Williamson at 19/07/2021 - 16:00
My daughter recently had an air source heat pump installed for typical 3 bed house. Beware who you buy from as after hers was installed she started getting huge electricity bills and heating was very poor. The engineer came out and said nothing was wrong so she was very disappointed. I used to be Corgi registered so had knowledge of gas heating but not air source. Looking at installation instructions I could see something didn't look right so called out engineer again but demanded different engineer and low and behold the previous one had made a pigs ear of just about everything including wiring. This engineer was there most of the day and got it all sorted and set up properly and daughter now very pleased, it's amazing how much heat can come from just the air especially in the winter. The outside unit is big with a large fan going.

by DSR

18:15 PM, 19th July 2021, About 3 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Dennis Leverett at 19/07/2021 - 16:38
and therein lies the next issue....a massive push from the gvt to install new things in place of gas so LL's can play the game of reaching EPC level C, yet inevitably not the actual expertise to fit it properly in the first place.
Green Homes Grant absurdity in a different form - I rest my case.

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