Subject to status and referencing

Subject to status and referencing

15:55 PM, 11th June 2019, About 2 years ago 110

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Might the phrase “Subject to status and referencing” be more politically correct than “No DSS”?

The only reason I can think of for using the “No DSS” phraseology is if advertising is priced on a per word or per character basis. Unless you’re advertising in a Newspaper, which is very rare in this digital age, I cannot see much point anyway.

Furthermore, according to Wikipedia, “the Department of Social Security (DSS) is a defunct governmental agency in the United Kingdom.”

With that being the case, I cannot understand why lenders T&C’s still use the phraseology, or indeed why lobbyists such as Generation Rent or Shelter have such a problem with it.

Landlords generally only want three things from their tenants:-

  1. Pay the rent on time
  2. Respect the property
  3. Respect the neighbours

Proper referencing of prospective tenants should enable landlords to make an informed choice, and to purchase Rent Guarantee, Legal Fees Protection and other forms of insurance to mitigate their risks. Therefore, in my opinion, the phrase “No DSS” is entirely superfluous to advertising.

What are your thoughts on this?



Comments

by Mick Roberts

7:05 AM, 14th June 2019, About 2 years ago

Reply to the comment left by Monty Bodkin at 13/06/2019 - 21:33Very true Monty. My HB lot, some get me out to change a light bulb or bleed the rads.
Whereas the Letting Agent passed checks lot, they have problems I don't know about till see them & it's great to hear they din't even ring me. One example, one rang the boiler warranty people direct when broke down, I din't even know.
My HB lot don't even save the plumbers phone number who rang em 3 hours ago to come in 5 hours. And I give 'em FULL ACCESS to plumber direct, they can't even save a number that could potentially get them out crap several times over the years. I joke with 'em about it. And say Why can't don't u even save this chaps number I'm letting u have direct contact to? Save me some time, keep me happy, get your stuff done quicker.

by Old Mrs Landlord

7:40 AM, 14th June 2019, About 2 years ago

Reply to the comment left by Mick Roberts at 14/06/2019 - 07:04
Mick, in the past I have watched some of your videos of the condition your houses have been left in by tenants on benefits. May I suggest you post links so that Amanda can see the evidence for herself?

by Mick Roberts

8:15 AM, 14th June 2019, About 2 years ago

https://youtu.be/i_HKaqYlHi4 Tenants from Hell Bulwell.

https://youtu.be/OzqVVRlZzE8 Tenants from Hell Bestwood Park

https://youtu.be/QcENHbgfMR4 Tenants from Hell Top Valley Nov 2010

https://youtu.be/_UvO8dmxGQQ Tenants from Hell May 12th 2010.

https://youtu.be/DzRIyfLHRn0 Tenants from Hell May 10th 2010.

There's dozens more on the site.

I was mean't to set up dedicated website years ago as ITV & Channel 4 kept pursuing me to do some programs, but u know what they like, turn it round so Landlord's at fault.
I've not done any for years, not had time, plus not too many to do either.

by Larry Sweeney

8:41 AM, 14th June 2019, About 2 years ago

Amelia Hartman is talking complete nonsense. Amelia sounds just like Shelter when they trot out this tosh to avoid bonding these high risk tenants. Amelia suggests we should be sitting down advising tenants with mental health problems ,how to claim CT reductions.
Sorry Amelia, your business plan is so perfect it clearly is a fairytale. Alliance advise is simple. Avoid benefit tenants. This is good news for you as you will have a bigger pool of benefit tenants to chose from.

by Beaver

11:19 AM, 14th June 2019, About 2 years ago

Reply to the comment left by ameliahartman at 13/06/2019 - 19:38
Thanks Amelia, that's helpful information.

So when you are considering letting to a tenant do you apply exactly the same criteria to tenants who are in receipt of benefits as you do to those who are working?

by Kate Mellor

9:38 AM, 15th June 2019, About 2 years ago

A blanket “No DSS” on your advertising discriminates against disabled renters. It also rules out those who can provide a home owning, working guarantor. There’s really no good reason to make such a blanket statement when some basic initial screening questions on an email template can rule out unsuitable viewing requests.

by Jessie Jones

11:00 AM, 15th June 2019, About 2 years ago

Surely the best way to lessen the risk of having a problem tenant is to set the rent at a slightly higher level.
Local Housing Allowance rates have remained stale for several years, as have most benefits, whilst wages have risen an average of 3% last year. My costs as a landlord have risen because of selective licensing, restrictions on allowable charges and changes to mortgage interest relief.
I make my houses a little nicer, and I charge a little more. Not by much, but it puts the rent beyond that which an applicant on benefits can afford. It's not my fault, it is simply market forces. As a result, I don't have to put 'No DSS' on my adverts.
I have had people on benefits insist that they can afford the rent, but I tell them that it would be irresponsible of me to let my house to someone, knowing that it would cause them financial hardship.
In reality, the LHA is no longer enough for me to provide 'nice' accommodation whilst still making a little profit. And I don't want to let scruffy properties.

by Mick Roberts

11:50 AM, 15th June 2019, About 2 years ago

Some great points Jessie, especially

My costs as a landlord have risen because of selective licensing, restrictions on allowable charges and changes to mortgage interest relief.

by Marie

12:38 PM, 15th June 2019, About 2 years ago

Reply to the comment left by Jessie Jones at 15/06/2019 - 11:00
Yes and don't forget homes have to be fit for human habitation!

by ameliahartman

3:14 AM, 18th June 2019, About 2 years ago

Obfuscated Data

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