Subject to status and referencing

Subject to status and referencing

15:55 PM, 11th June 2019, About 2 years ago 110

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Might the phrase “Subject to status and referencing” be more politically correct than “No DSS”?

The only reason I can think of for using the “No DSS” phraseology is if advertising is priced on a per word or per character basis. Unless you’re advertising in a Newspaper, which is very rare in this digital age, I cannot see much point anyway.

Furthermore, according to Wikipedia, “the Department of Social Security (DSS) is a defunct governmental agency in the United Kingdom.”

With that being the case, I cannot understand why lenders T&C’s still use the phraseology, or indeed why lobbyists such as Generation Rent or Shelter have such a problem with it.

Landlords generally only want three things from their tenants:-

  1. Pay the rent on time
  2. Respect the property
  3. Respect the neighbours

Proper referencing of prospective tenants should enable landlords to make an informed choice, and to purchase Rent Guarantee, Legal Fees Protection and other forms of insurance to mitigate their risks. Therefore, in my opinion, the phrase “No DSS” is entirely superfluous to advertising.

What are your thoughts on this?



Comments

by Seething Landlord

10:27 AM, 21st June 2019, About 2 years ago

Reply to the comment left by David Price at 21/06/2019 - 09:15
If you seriously expect a reply to your question I suggest that you be more specific by defining what you mean by comfortable, which particular procedures you have in mind and why you believe that they are recursive.

by David Price

10:35 AM, 21st June 2019, About 2 years ago

Reply to the comment left by Seething Landlord at 21/06/2019 - 10:27
All will be revealed when (if) Amelia replies.

by Seething Landlord

10:48 AM, 21st June 2019, About 2 years ago

Reply to the comment left by David Price at 21/06/2019 - 10:35
Are you really saying that the answer will define the question?

by David Price

10:52 AM, 21st June 2019, About 2 years ago

The question is well defined but your area of expertise did not enable you to understand it.

by Kate Mellor

10:53 AM, 21st June 2019, About 2 years ago

Reply to the comment left by JJ at 21/06/2019 - 09:30
JJ it very much depends on which council your property is in. Some actively pursue landlords I believe from what I’ve read on here. I’ve had two tenants in a block that were found to have been over claiming and had their benefits stopped. (I think one was caught & dobbed in the other out of peevishness). Our council never attempted to blame us or claim back payments even though we were in direct receipt of the benefits in both cases.

by Kate Mellor

10:57 AM, 21st June 2019, About 2 years ago

Reply to the comment left by David Price at 21/06/2019 - 10:35
David Price, you’re like a naughty schoolboy. Stop pulling Amelia’s pigtails! 😛

by Beaver

10:59 AM, 21st June 2019, About 2 years ago

Reply to the comment left by Kate Mellor at 21/06/2019 - 10:53
That's helpful thanks Kate. 🙂

So do you regularly check council tenant's entitlement to benefits whilst they are in the property? Or do you just check at the start of the tenancy?

by David Price

11:01 AM, 21st June 2019, About 2 years ago

Reply to the comment left by Kate Mellor at 21/06/2019 - 10:57Thank you Kate, it is actually more than Seventy years since I have been called (justifiably) a naughty schoolboy.

There is a serious intent in my question to Amelia, it is not frivolous.

by Seething Landlord

11:56 AM, 21st June 2019, About 2 years ago

Reply to the comment left by David Price at 21/06/2019 - 10:52
You are correct in assuming that I do not understand the question which is why I suggested that you might like to amplify it so that there is some chance of the other 99% of contributors to this forum who are in a similar state of ignorance being enlightened. It may be that Amelia belongs to the 1% who are scientists, mathematicians or computer programmers and has immediately understood what you are asking, in which case I look forward to seeing her reply.

by Beaver

12:08 PM, 21st June 2019, About 2 years ago

Reply to the comment left by David Price at 21/06/2019 - 11:01
David

You may suspect that Amelia is not a real landlord; I actually doubt whether she would bother to construct posts this elaborate if she were not and I'm quite happy to accept that she is one.

Whether the intent in your question is serious or not I find Amelia's posts useful and interesting and Amelia will I suspect be much more inclined to contribute if you abandon this particular line of questioning and ask a more interesting one.

A more interesting question for me is related to the fact that according to her posts Amelia makes £30 profit per month per property. At this rate a quick in the head calculation tells me that in income terms she would need about 35 properties just to reach the nil rate tax band.

So, if we accept the premise that Amelia is a real landlord, and if we accept that she likes housing people on benefits, it is perhaps a more interesting question to ask:
- are the properties mortgaged?
- in financial terms, why are you doing it? Income? Pension?


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