Manifesto from Generation Rent Et al

by Property 118

10:50 AM, 4th November 2019
About 2 weeks ago

Manifesto from Generation Rent Et al

Make Text Bigger
Manifesto from Generation Rent Et al

A collection of campaign groups and think tanks have come together to create a Manifesto for renters in the hope of influencing political parties in the coming General Election. The Group Includes Generation Rent, New Economics Foundation, the London Renters Union, Tenants Union UK and ACORN.

Their agenda is to ban Section 21 evictions, introduce of rent controls and force landlords to end bans on benefits tenants. The individual institutions have all released statements in support.

Director of Generation Rent, Dan Wilson Craw, said: “The security of home ownership is closed off to millions of people who cannot save when their wage increases are simply swallowed up by the rent. Private renters are growing older and raising children in insecure, expensive homes, and will be thinking about this on the way to polling stations on 12 December.

“Any party that wants to run the country must offer renters stable and affordable homes, and this manifesto sets out how to deliver that.”

Nick Ballard, of ACORN, said: “Landlords up and down the country benefit from and contribute to the country’s acute housing crisis by restricting access to housing through ever higher rents.”

“In the absence of rent controls they have monetised the human need for shelter and turned homes into assets. Restricting supply of a universal need at times of crisis is profiteering. This needs to change. The next government must cap rents at 30% of local income, put a stop to the financialisation of housing and create a national database of landlords and rents to ensure decent, dignified and affordable housing for all.”

CEO of New Economics Foundation, Miatta Fahnbulleh commented: “Private renting is broken, unaffordable, insecure and often unsafe. This manifesto outlines the policies we need to fix our housing system, and improve conditions for the millions of private renters in the UK.

“The demand for change on private renting is growing, and the size of the renters vote is hugely influential. Political parties would be foolish to ignore this.”

The group also claim that 1 out of every 7 properties rented in the PRS is unsafe.



Comments

Old Mrs Landlord

12:15 PM, 4th November 2019
About 2 weeks ago

The only surprise is that Shelter are missing from this unholy alliance of anti-landlord pressure groups. This manifesto is the perfect prescription for causing a mass exodus of private landlords from the sector. Then, when their accusation of "Landlords... restricting access to housing" is actually fulfilled, they might finally realise that all along landlords have actually been the ones providing housing. "Landlords have monetised the human need for shelter" is another ridiculous accusation. Basic economics monetises shelter, because the provision of shelter costs money. Do they imagine their rental properties cost the landlord nothing to buy and maintain? Or that the costs in time, stress and tax and all the risks involved should voluntarily be shouldered by landlords as a sort of charitable hobby? And how on earth will creating a national database of landlords and rents "put a stop to the financialisation of housing"?
This is just the politics of envy. On the basis of these arguments I might as well complain that supermarkets have restricted my access to groceries by charging "ever higher" prices.

Ian Narbeth

15:35 PM, 4th November 2019
About A week ago

“Landlords up and down the country benefit from and contribute to the country’s acute housing crisis by restricting access to housing through ever higher rents.” Reducing rents does not add a single house to the total number of houses in the country. If anything rent restrictions will lead to fewer properties being available.

"In the absence of rent controls they have monetised the human need for shelter and turned homes into assets. Restricting supply of a universal need at times of crisis is profiteering. This needs to change. ..."

By this logic Sainsbury's have monetised the human need for food, Primark have monetised the human need for clothes and Thames Water have monetised the human need for drinking water. So what?

Landlords would rather rent out their properties but if the rule is to be: the instant you sign up a tenant the tenant can stay for life if he chooses, guess what happens?

Fiona

8:23 AM, 5th November 2019
About A week ago

Reply to the comment left by Ian Narbeth at 04/11/2019 - 15:35
Perfectly said Ian.

Charles Holt

8:34 AM, 5th November 2019
About A week ago

I completely agree with the two previous commentators to this thread. As a landlord in Lincolnshire, I have never been able to increase rents, even if I wanted to. I started renting out in 2008, and three of our six properties (very small 2-bed houses, new builds) actually rent for less now than they did then. The other three (2 flats and a bungalow) are achieving the same rent. It is a market, driven by DEMAND, and SUPPLY that causes rents to rise - or fall. Clearly supply is the issue in many parts of the UK, and that is hardly landlords' fault. The PRS has increased supply!
So, what is to be done? Clearly a greater supply of social housing would be hugely beneficial to renters. Will a new government deliver? Possibly, but most unlikely. But allowing renters to stay for a lifetime, or to offer them a 'right to buy' is clearly going to cause landlords to sell up en masse, and quickly.
A better idea for all is surely to give renters more security, but not for ever. I hate it when a tenant leaves, as voids always cause me a loss. Lost rents and more costs, time and hassle. My proposal is for EASTs. These are Evergreen Assured Shorthold Tenancies. In effect, they would be rolling twelve month (or possibly a different term) tenancies. So both parties would always have to give this level (12 months) of notice. I would also write in a penalty clause for earlier determination - six month's rent for landlords and three months for tenants. So get rid of ASTs, and bring in EASTs. There - a landlord can't be fairer than that!

Lesley Lester

8:46 AM, 5th November 2019
About A week ago

When will the left wing parasites understand that Landlords are a "business not a charity", to get into this position we have saved gone without and taken risks. Strange that the HMRC will take taxes if we sell and make a profit, however will not give refunds for loses!

christine walker

9:01 AM, 5th November 2019
About A week ago

Good idea Charles Holt. If we have to mess about with the laws and regs in the PRS, this could just work.

Sam Smith

9:40 AM, 5th November 2019
About A week ago

How do rents linked to 30% of local income even work?

Should rents be linked to one person’s income or if there are 2 incomes in a household, then do they look at two incomes?

What about variables in housing stock. Are they saying a 3 bed flat house or flat should cost the same as a 1 bed flat?

Dennis Leverett

10:06 AM, 5th November 2019
About A week ago

How on earth can intelligent/intellectual, supposedly, persons write such a naïve manifesto none of which is realistic. It's so simple, there aren't enough houses available social or otherwise made worse by large numbers of immigrants coming into this country, not a racist comment, net immigration to year ending March 2019 was 226,000, that's a lot of extra houses needed in just one year. It's supply and demand, build lots of social housing and rents eventually will level out. The PRS are providing a desperately needed service that no-one else is and that's it. Taking out capital gain which could depending on who next runs the country, easily go either way as in 80's, my return on investment after everything is just under 4% and then taxed. I am the one taking the risk of my investment using my hard earned cash to house people, no-one else. If this election goes the wrong way then I'm out, sorry tenants, but of course I will get the blame for the increase in homelessness its a no win situation for us whatever we do.

JJ

12:00 PM, 5th November 2019
About A week ago

Reply to the comment left by Dennis Leverett at 05/11/2019 - 10:06
That net migration figure also has a considerable environmental impact.

Whiteskifreak Surrey

13:59 PM, 5th November 2019
About A week ago

Reply to the comment left by JJ at 05/11/2019 - 12:00
You do not need to worry, EU migrants are leaving in droves, they are fed up with Brexit, crap pound, hostility and a general attitude here. That is why the number of EU nurses' applications dropped 95%. That is of course a desired effect of Brexit.
I also anticipate a new wave of immigrants from the countries who offer us a FTA in exchange of free movement. That is of course also a desired effect of Brexit.

1 2

Leave Comments

Please Log-In OR Become a member to reply to comments or subscribe to new comment notifications.

Forgotten your password?

OR

BECOME A MEMBER

Selective licensing ammunition from Nottingham

The Landlords Union

Become a Member, it's FREE

Our mission is to facilitate the sharing of best practice amongst UK landlords, tenants and letting agents

Learn More