Action not words needed from landlords

Action not words needed from landlords

10:33 AM, 7th November 2022, About 4 weeks ago 77

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Hello, So it has come to pass!  I have finally decided we must collectively and actively respond to the bludgeoning government policy against landlords where it hurts most – their voter base.

I will be starting a Change.org campaign which, if it reaches 10,000 signatures, will be debated in Parliament. This should be easy to reach as there over 400,000 PRS landlords who have not been represented well by many of our landlord associations.

We must speak up for ourselves!

It is because the pendulum of voices are weighted high for tenants that landlords voices are drowned out.

So, by having a call to arms, so to speak, and getting all landlords to spread the word about the petition – to repeal section 24 immediately – we can begin to reclaim our purpose back to provide a housing sector fit for both tenants and housing providers, as opposed to the insanity prevailing with a tenant’s blindsided view of the real world.

Keep an eye out for further details.

Paul



Comments

DSR

23:34 PM, 10th November 2022, About 4 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by DP at 10/11/2022 - 07:29
aahhh I took that feeling away too after...

Furthermore in the BBC news online the article it quotes Shelter (cough and spit..) as saying the following...

What should you do if you cannot pay your rent?
Paying your rent should be your "number one priority" because if you fall behind you could be at risk of eviction.
If you are struggling, Shelter recommends making a list of your current outgoings with rent at the top, then see where you can make cuts to ensure you have enough money to go round.
Do not ignore letters from your landlord or letting agent - instead, see if you can work out a repayment plan using online calculators to help you. Shelter has a repayment plan proposal template letter people can use to communicate with their landlord.
You could also try to negotiate a rent reduction with your landlord.
If you are claiming benefits, you can ask the Department for Work and Pensions to pay your housing element straight to your landlord if you owe at least two months' rent and in some other situations. This can speed things up if you face eviction and reassure your landlord.
Source: Shelter
---------------
Am I reading this right...no mention of nasty LL raising the rent just for the hell of it? What's going on? I think its dawning like you say.....the reality that tenants, IF you have a PRS LL then YES you do have to pay your bloody rent and YES the nest thing is to talk to them and YES we might help!

The tenant needs to read this to realise that Shelter (spits again) will only offer you advice or a leaflet and clearly wont be offering you anything else so best not burn your bridges with your LL.....

NewYorkie

0:43 AM, 11th November 2022, About 4 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by DSR at 10/11/2022 - 23:34
This is not the Shelter we have come to love! We know they do nothing for renters in terms of finding them accommodation, so maybe they have realised the world is changing for the worse for renters, and they have been largely responsible through their persistent landlord bashing, and lobbying of Parliament around the dinner tables of North London. They will be desperate to maintain their funding, and need a new face. Hypocrites!

TheMaluka

8:13 AM, 11th November 2022, About 4 weeks ago

Beware the new public attitude of Shelter could be "the smile on the face of the Tiger" with the landlord inside.

DSR

8:34 AM, 11th November 2022, About 4 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by NewYorkie at 11/11/2022 - 00:43
I like to live in hope.

Nice Cop Shelter/Bad Cop Shelter??

Either way we all know which side of the fence they sit on ultimately so ANYTHIG that comes out of their mouth is tarnished with that undertone....

Jerry stone

9:09 AM, 11th November 2022, About 4 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by DSR at 11/11/2022 - 08:34
Quite agree.
I used to support shelter and be a contributor when they were truly a tenant organisation.

They are not now.

They are a left wing lobby organisation.

They have massive financial reserves that could be spent on supporting people not destroying the private rental market.

Jerry stone

9:09 AM, 11th November 2022, About 4 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by DSR at 11/11/2022 - 08:34
Quite agree.
I used to support shelter and be a contributor when they were truly a tenant organisation.

They are not now.

They are a left wing lobby organisation.

They have massive financial reserves that could be spent on supporting people not destroying the private rental market.

Glynn Jones

17:10 PM, 11th November 2022, About 4 weeks ago

I think we sometimes kid ourselves with regard to the need for us to provide the housing society needs. On any given night in the UK there are a finite number of heads that need pillows, there are also a finite number of bedrooms. It is the difference between these two numbers that causes a housing problem. Us buying property so that we can let it doesn't actually contribute or take away anything, the property was already there. If we stopped buying houses to let do you think the property market would collapse? The only way this problem can be solved is by building more affordable housing. Perhaps if Shelter stopped spending on their campaign to demonise landlords and actually built some housing to let and show us how it should be done or let's get back to building Council houses and keep them as rental properties.I think there would still be plenty of customers for our lets.

Jerry stone

17:17 PM, 11th November 2022, About 4 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by Glynn Jones at 11/11/2022 - 17:10
Have you seen how much social and council housing cost to build?
They can’t manage the stock that they have properly.

NewYorkie

10:47 AM, 12th November 2022, About 4 weeks ago

I don't understand why shelter should maintain such high reserves. They are not a business which needs to invest or provide for tough times, they don't create any wealth, they don't produce anything, they clearly pay their non-management people badly.

If they were serious about addressing the housing crisis, they could invest in building to rent for low income working families [who don't live on benefits rather than working!].

They could then claim to be a lower cost alternative to private landlords, but they won't, because that would mean actually being held responsible for doing something, as opposed to just complaining about the problem.

Kodor Miah

11:07 AM, 12th November 2022, About 4 weeks ago

Yes I agreed

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