One million renters handed section 21 notices since 2019 – Shelter

One million renters handed section 21 notices since 2019 – Shelter

10:07 AM, 18th April 2024, About 2 months ago 32

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Homelessness charity Shelter claims that since the government unveiled plans in 2019 to abolish Section 21 ‘no-fault’ evictions, nearly one million tenants have been evicted under the process.

It also warns that any further delay in banning Section 21 will see more renters being ‘tipped into homelessness’.

The charity’s survey also found that the moving costs for tenants are around £550m every year.

And in the past 12 months, 830,000 tenants say they’ve had to relocate against their wishes after a tenancy ended, they were priced out by a rent rise or were handed a Section 21 notice.

That’s 500 renters having to relocate every day, Shelter claims.

Tenants are facing rising costs

The charity also says that being forced to move means tenants are facing rising costs for upfront deposits and rents which cost more than £1bn every year – which is £1,245 per person, on average.

Shelter’s chief executive, Polly Neate, said: “Tenants are coughing up millions in unwanted and unwarranted moves, while the government runs scared of a minority of its own MPs.

“Instead of striking dodgy deals with backbenchers to strangle the Renters (Reform) Bill, Ministers should defend renters’ best hope of a stable home.”

She adds: “With protections from eviction so weak and rents so high, we constantly hear from people forced out of their homes and communities at huge personal cost.

“It’s impossible for renters to put down roots knowing a no-fault eviction could plunge them back into chaos at any moment.”

Renters (Reform) Bill is set to return to Parliament

The Renters (Reform) Bill, which aims to abolish no-fault evictions, is set to return to Parliament next week but a leaked letter from Levelling Up Minister Jacob Young revealed plans to dilute the much-anticipated bill.

Shelter’s survey also found that 40% of all renters questioned had been forced to move.

The reasons for these varied, with 245,000 tenants having to move because their fixed-term tenancy ended and 61,000 being priced out due to a rent increase.

Nearly 190,000 received a legal eviction notice, and 135,000 were informally asked to leave by their landlord.

The cost of moving leads to unrecoverable costs for tenants

Shelter says that the cost of moving leads to unrecoverable costs for tenants, including overlapping rent and bill payments, property viewing and moving costs, cleaning fees and one-off charges like wi-fi installation.

On average, these costs leave renters £669 out of pocket.

When adding other upfront costs, such as advance rent payments and tenancy deposits, the average cost of each unwanted move rises to £1,245, totalling more than £1bn collectively, Shelter says.

The figures do not include rising living costs and rent increases – and this week the Office for National Statistics (ONS) reported that rents had increased by £107 per month (9.1%), and by £207 per month in London (11.2%) in the year up to March.

Watch the Sky News report on this issue, including an interview with Jacob Young, who explains that the MPs who want changes understand how the private rented sector operates. Landlords might also be surprised to hear the reporter claim at the end that ‘It’s all too often that charities like Shelter are left to pick up the bill for renters like Natalie’:


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Comments

Cider Drinker

10:18 AM, 18th April 2024, About 2 months ago

How many were issued with Section 8 ‘no fault’ evictions?

How many of those Section 21 evictions were issued when there was fault from the tenant?

How many were issued when the tenant requested a Section 21.

Of course, we do t know the answer to the last two questions.

Housing crisis could be fixed if we protected our borders. The government chooses not to bother.

Paul

10:23 AM, 18th April 2024, About 2 months ago

I have never used a section 21, I've been lucky perhaps. I've used a section 8. Tenants do not get asked to leave a property without good reason. It makes no sense for a landlord to ask a tenant to leave if there are no issues. It costs the landlord money in lost rent, tidying up the property, paying for all legal fee's associated with re-letting ect. I would suggest a 21 notice saves having to get into tit for tat arguments with tenants as I would suggest some tenants have no idea the problems they cause a property and if you tried to explain it would just end in a slagging match. I've had to 'pay-off' tenants to leave because they have not paid the rent, not sure if shelters stats show these items. Things is the more they try to help, and I do believe this is what they want to do, the more they turn landlords away from what we do. Markets have changed, legislation has come in and Tax legislatin has altered. Our money can quite happily go elsewhere without being a 25/7 support line for tenants.... Oh dear, do I sound a tad grumpy ? Fortunately, all my tenants are lovely and I get on great with them. Phew !

Nikki Palmer

10:34 AM, 18th April 2024, About 2 months ago

I million over 5 years but how many weren't served notice

I think it would take a very special sort of person to not understand that there are some Landlords who were never intending to rent out their property but who had a change in circumstance, couldn't sell, had to relocate themselves and all the reasons that tenants move around and have the freedom to do so by giving one month's notice.
Long term investment Landlords are also being hit hard by high interest rates, unless of course they are in a position to buy with cash.

When are we going to see Shelter being a real charity and start investing their money into providing their own rental property - perhaps then they will get to understand both sides of the coin instead of this constant Landlord bashing

moneymanager

10:41 AM, 18th April 2024, About 2 months ago

Or, more specifically,onen million tenants informed of the potential legal consequences of neither exiting or agreeing terms.

AT

10:57 AM, 18th April 2024, About 2 months ago

I have used S21 twice in 20 years of letting, both times on troublesome tenants.

Facts are twisted to make landlords look bad. This is just awful.

The news should read; over the years
100 million tenancies ended successfully and those tenants went on with their good lives.

There are good and bad people on both sides and in media.

juliet bonnet

11:05 AM, 18th April 2024, About 2 months ago

Many of us landlords choose to use section 21 precisely because you don't need to give a reason, as neighbours are often too frightened of retribution from the outgoing tenant... Also outgoing tenant more likely to cause further damage as retribution for being 'named and shamed'.

NewYorkie

11:22 AM, 18th April 2024, About 2 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Paul at 18/04/2024 - 10:23
As I keep saying, landlords have a choice as to where they invest their money, and for me, that's no longer in BTL.

I noticed this at the end... 'Watch the Sky News report on this issue, including an interview with Jacob Young, who explains that the MPs who want changes understand how the private rented sector operates. Landlords might also be surprised to hear the reporter claim at the end that ‘It’s all too often that charities like Shelter are left to pick up the bill for renters like Natalie’

Since when does Shelter 'pick up the bill' for anything to help the homeless?

Gary Lowden

11:30 AM, 18th April 2024, About 2 months ago

Ok I have cooled off enough to put fingers to key pad but this will be the last time " i am done with this B***S*** I have been in the Letting industry for 28 years, when i joined in 1996 it was at the beginning of the letting boom And what ever government that was in power (Doesn't matter all the same) had messed up on pensions. So people were looking to put there hard earned money somewhere else and property seemed like a good idea. What a lot of these reluctant landlords become was a savior of again what ever dimwits were in power by plugging a huge gap in the housing market as no one was building enough property. For many of these landlords the rented House/Flat became the pension pot to be sold at some point to retire on or give it to there kids/grand kids. Since the industry has become so huge the government has tried to get its slimy tentacle's into it as its seen a money tree gain for the pockets. Be chipping away and making harder for landlords than ever, and with recent interest rate rises along with loosing the tax breaks and then the final cap "Mr. Landlord you can only get YOUR property back under special circumstance and then being hounded by those loonies SHELTER, GENARATION RENT they have said in there thousand's its time to go!! and cash in our assets. So well done Polly you have affectively forced tenants out all by yourself. Dear Polly Landlords are not!! a Charity!!! it always was and always will be business!. What will you do Polly when there are no more landlord Left?? how will you justify your salary then? May be you and your and your charity can start to build homes, or may be you can convince the government to provide homes for its voters. I am Done. Sorry its so long.

Ray Guselli

12:06 PM, 18th April 2024, About 2 months ago

There are always reasons , often legitimate, why a S21 notice is issued: after all, most landlords strive hard to keep good tenants.

But actually, this is not as bad as Shelter makes it out to be.

Apparently there are 8,627,821 people renting in the UK.

This means that more than 88% of them, 7627821, have NOT received a S21 and are still resident.

If, as a landlord, I would only issue a S21 (or S8) if there were problems with a tenant, the above figures suggest that landlords are trying to keep tenants rather than evict them.

Perhaps the greatest other cause of eviction is the fear-mongering from Shelter etc

Fred M BARRETT

13:00 PM, 18th April 2024, About 2 months ago

A hidden loss to the sector is contract workers who need to relocate. Parents of one of my students had to relocate for 6 months. They set up an AST but the tenants refused to move out at the end for 5 further months. They also stopped paying rent as they had been 'advised' the LL would not be able to successfully take them to court and force the money out of them. How many workers are thinking twice about renting out if they work away on contract? Others are turning to Guardianship arrangements or airbnb run by friends or family. Any figures for this?

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