Eco Clampdown on landlords and fines of up to £5,000

Eco Clampdown on landlords and fines of up to £5,000

14:45 PM, 22nd October 2021, About 3 months ago 68

Text Size

New support for councils to raise awareness and enforce rules banning landlords renting homes with worst-performing energy efficiency ratings has been announced by the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy.

Along with a campaign to fund local radio ads, landlord workshops, free property surveys and a thermal imaging drone for inspections.

Since April last year privately rented homes must meet a minimum energy performance rating of EPC Band E, making it illegal to rent out homes below that unless landlords have a limited exemption. Landlords caught failing to fulfil their obligations can be fined of up to £5,000 per property and per breach.

The £4.3 million of extra funding from the Department for Business Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS) to councils across the country is designed to support them make an extra 100,000 engagements with the most difficult to reach landlords with the worst performing properties.

Business and Energy Minister, Lord Callanan, said: “This funding will help councils to support landlords with these important energy efficiency changes, but also enforce these standards, helping tackle fuel poverty and ensuring everyone can live in a warm home with fair energy bills.

“Heating our homes and buildings makes up almost a third of all carbon emissions, meaning raising the energy efficiency of our properties is something we all have to contribute to help us build back greener and reach our world leading climate ambitions.”

The government has set 2035 as the target for all homes across the UK to reach EPC C by 2035



Comments

by Seething Landlord

20:29 PM, 10th November 2021, About 2 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Ofer Moses at 10/11/2021 - 20:17Section 5 of the guidance for landlords might be helpful but it has always been a bit of a grey area so I doubt if there is yet a clear answer to your problem. See https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/electrical-safety-standards-in-the-private-rented-sector-guidance-for-landlords-tenants-and-local-authorities/guide-for-landlords-electrical-safety-standards-in-the-private-rented-sector

by Ofer Moses

7:57 AM, 11th November 2021, About 2 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Seething Landlord at 10/11/2021 - 20:29
Many thanks for your reply

by Martin Riddle

14:37 PM, 11th November 2021, About 2 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Seething Landlord at 25/10/2021 - 10:54
Don't forget Council and Housing Association (HA) properties are exempt from the EPC E rules and its likely the will not have to comply with the EPC C level in April 2025. I know several HA properties that are EPC F and a couple of EPC G!!
One of the "G" properties is a one bedroom flat with storage heaters (20+ years old) and they pay £200/month for electric. PS No mains gas fitted

by Ofer Moses

7:54 AM, 12th November 2021, About 2 months ago

Hi All,
Is an electrical engineer who carries out EICR Inspection without being registered breaking the law.

The Council are not accepting his EICR and I wondered what action I may be able to take against the contractor as he claims the council are at fault.
He is registered for domestic installation with NICEIC, but not for inspections.
Look forward to your comments

by Seething Landlord

8:36 AM, 12th November 2021, About 2 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Ofer Moses at 12/11/2021 - 07:54
You would probably reach a wider audience if you raised this as a new member's question rather than it being buried on page 7 of an unconnected topic.

by Chris Byways

8:32 AM, 13th November 2021, About 2 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Ofer Moses at 10/11/2021 - 20:17
Off topic, Does this ‘guidance’ help?
12.10 Carrying out an inspection of electrical installations is a complex task that requires an extra level of qualification and competence achieved beyond the standard 4-year vocational route commonly followed by qualified inspectors and testers. Therefore, Government will develop, with industry experts, new guidance for landlords stipulating who can carry out the mandatory electrical installation checks.
12.11 Within the new guidance landlords will be advised that competence will be met if an inspector and tester is a member of a competent person scheme or has met the requirements set out in a checklist. In addition to the checklist in the new guidance, industry scheme operators will be invited to set up a new electrical inspection and testing competent person scheme which inspectors and testers could choose to join. A reference to these schemes would also be made in the Government’s ‘How to Rent Guide’.

by Malcolm Ratcliffe

10:19 AM, 13th November 2021, About 2 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Seething Landlord at 26/10/2021 - 14:41
Yes EPC scheme is a shambles. I believe that surveyors can look in lofts to see insulation, if the insulation cannot be seen (e.g. internal insulation to a solid brick wall) then measurements could be made of wall thicknesses etc and a professional EPC surveyor could make a good estimation of unseen insulation. In the depth of winter, in a heated house a thermal camera can measure wall temperatures and see cold spots ( such as nail heads etc). I’m not a professional but have insulated my house over 40 years to improve living conditions and reduce fuel bills substantially.

I have experience of EPC surveyors and read many reports from my daughters house purchase. As EPC is a legal requirement, some estate agent will offer a ‘cash in hand’ survey. In one instance I had a surveyor insist that hot water was heated by electricity because there was a redundant switch that said hot water. (He was there as I complained about the EPC as potential purchaser). There was a gas boiler, we showed the pipes and disconnected immersion heater. It did no good.

There used to be annual reports from the gov dept or whoever oversees EPC. I discovered that these reports had stopped for many years.

All a surveyor needs is registration with a group who is registered, an iPad with software on it where they can tick boxes (including the popular) “assumed insulation standards at time of construction are met”, or similar wording.

How much is an EPC you can believe in?

Residential EPC - £34.00 - Order your EPC Online!
http://energyperformancecertificates.co.uk
AdNationwide Domestic EPC's.
Track Your Order · 5000+ Clients per Month · Accredited Assessors · Nationwide Coverage
Services: Residential EPCs, Gas Certificates, EICRs, Boiler Services

by Malcolm Ratcliffe

10:24 AM, 13th November 2021, About 2 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Cathie at 25/10/2021 - 15:03
Download all EPCs in area … could be done easily. However it assumes the EPC is a professional one. Unlike the “drive by one” below. (looked at the property on Google Earth)?

Residential EPC - £34.00 - Order your EPC Online!
http://energyperformancecertificates.co.uk
AdNationwide Domestic EPC's.
Track Your Order · 5000+ Clients per Month · Accredited Assessors · Nationwide Coverage
Services: Residential EPCs, Gas Certificates, EICRs, Boiler Services

1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Leave Comments

Please Log-In OR Become a member to reply to comments or subscribe to new comment notifications.

Forgotten your password?

BECOME A MEMBER