DIY Legionella Risk Assessment Reports for Just £9

DIY Legionella Risk Assessment Reports for Just £9

11:50 AM, 6th October 2015, About 6 years ago 71

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Landlords are under a legal duty of care to ensure that the risk of exposure to Legionella for tenants, residents and visitors to their properties is adequately assessed and controlled.

Landlords are obligated to have a risk assessment conducted out on their properties followed by subsequent periodic reviews. Provided that the property is low risk (which includes most residential settings including houses or flats with small domestic type water systems) there is no reason why the landlord should not carry out the risk assessment themselves.

With this in mind Property118 have negotiated an exclusive discount on the normal price of a Legionella Risk Assessment.

Please CLICK HERE and follow the step by step guide and use the form at the bottom of the page to produce your Legionella Risk Assessment for £8.95

Legionella Risk AssessmentAfter the Legionella Risk Assessment ‘do I need it or not’ debate, on October 1st the House of Commons Published a paper making the rules clear, stating “Specifically, landlords are obligated to have a risk assessment conducted out on their properties”

Tenants should be advised of any control measures put in place that should be maintained eg not to adjust the temperature setting of the calorifier, to regularly clean showerheads and tenants should inform the landlord if the hot water is not heating properly or there are any other problems with the system so that appropriate action can be taken.

Where showers are installed, these have the means of creating and dispersing water droplets (aerosols) which may be inhaled causing a foreseeable risk of exposure to Legionella. If used regularly (as in the majority of most domestic settings) the risks are reduced but in any case, tenants should be advised to regularly clean and disinfect showerheads. Instantaneous electric showers pose less of a risk as they are generally cold water-fed and heat only small volumes of water during operationLegionella Risk Assessment

A Legionella Risk Assessment is a legal requirement for all domestic properties which are rented to a tenant.

The purpose of a legionella risk assessment for your rental properties is to ensure that you have taken sufficient note of the possibility of legionella in your water system and to give practical advice to your tenants.

Most of the information you need to provide to your tenant will be contained in our prepopulated legionella risk assessment template.

Property118 have negotiated an exclusive discount on the normal price of a Legionella Risk Assessment.

Please CLICK HERE and follow the step by step guide and use the form at the bottom of the page to produce your Legionella Risk Assessment for £8.95



Comments

by

20:42 PM, 10th October 2015, About 6 years ago

Not rocket science at all, but if your assessment is defective, because it was found to be a copy and you were Not competent to carry that risk assessment out - then expect to be found at fault in a court case.
By the way, if in one out of ten cases of LD, your tenant dies, and you should face a multi-million pound claim, don't think your Insurance company won't find a fault with your ' Risk Assessment App;
In my humble opinion.

by Ralph Butters

21:50 PM, 10th October 2015, About 6 years ago

Chris,

You are entitled to your opinion.

My opinion together with that of an accreditation body, a health and safety training company and a qualified legionela risk assessor who produces these reports, it is compliant and perfectly acceptable.

I think we should leave it there as we have both made our positions clear.

by Graham Landlord

8:57 AM, 12th October 2015, About 6 years ago

Given perhaps 80 million people in the UK. Living in around 45/50 million homes, what is the "to 1" probability of your tenant dying of LD in any one year? I suggest about the same probability that you have of a tenant winning the lottery or getting struck by lighting. Over 10 million to 1. By comparison the chance of a normal adult, (you and me) of normal heath, dying in any one year by an accident or failing heath is a mere 25,000 to 1. So using simple maths, for every 100,000 tenants, in any given year 4 will die. Statistically how many will catch LD and how many will die of LD. None. I don’t any issue with protecting my tenants from a realistic potential risk, supported by an Actuary table of facts, but the facts don’t support LD as probable risk by any measure.

People, in my opinion waste money on “feng shui experts”. If someone wants to pay a LD “Expert” that is their choice. The toll puddle martyrs stood up for unions. Sara Parks stood up against segregation, perhaps Landlords should unite against, and stand-up against, unnecessary legislation aimed at protecting tenants from risks, that per million people, are so unlikely as to be as not to be creditable. I have insurance that protects me from being sued by my tenants for injury or loss on my property. The insurance company asks questions about the quality of maintenance and fire risk. The insurance company has all the statics to hand, they have never asked me a single question about water and LD. Like “Do I have cold water tanks in the loft?” Why not? Because they know the risk is to low to warrant a question.

by AlanR

12:36 PM, 12th October 2015, About 6 years ago

I have performed my own LD assessments using the assessment form downloaded for free from the RLA. I also supplied the tenants with LD information from the RLA

I have two terraced properties both with combi boiler systems. There are no dead-ends in the systems. The risk is minute and would probably only be present if the properties were unoccupied for an extended period.

I am an engineer and worked in the marine and offshore oil industries for 40+ years. Part of my many responsibilities was the maintenance of hotel systems such as air conditioning, ventilation and potable water systems. I never experienced any LD infections in all of that time.

I really don't see the need to hire an LD "expert" to perform risk assessments on very basic domestic systems.

by Graham Landlord

12:51 PM, 12th October 2015, About 6 years ago

Well done and totally agree. I am also an engineer.

by Graham Landlord

13:31 PM, 12th October 2015, About 6 years ago

What is also odd about the LD assessment requirement is when you compare it to lack of any Fire Risk assessment being required. (except HMO's) It is a published fact that the Fire Brigade attend 45,000 home fires a year. 15,000 people are reported as injured and 365 people die. Now add all the small fires where the Fire Brigade aren’t called. Yet only now, from the 1st Oct, if you are renting out a two story house, do you have to fit at the least a battery smoke detector on each floor, but you don’t have to provide a written fire risk assessment of the property. I visited a property where the Landlord had innocently, removed the kitchen door to give it an open plan feel. A high risk thing to do, considering 68% of all fires start in the kitchen. I know, if I was renting, I would much soon the Landlord had done a fire risk assessment for my family than a LD !!!

by Joe Bloggs

14:49 PM, 12th October 2015, About 6 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Graham Chilvers" at "12/10/2015 - 13:31":

indeed. i see many examples of not just the kitchen door but the partition being removed! this is often recommended on 'educational' programmes such as under the hammer.

by Jireh Homes

15:40 PM, 21st October 2015, About 6 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Alan Robinson" at "12/10/2015 - 12:36":

In response to postings by Alan & Graham, support their view that having an engineering background is an strong basis for being competent to understand and assess the risks associated with poor design and lack of control. Some DIY landlords and letting agents providing this service may in the very slight chance of an incident be viewed not competent in this field and thus place themselves at risk. Also many properties are not new builds with gas fired combination boilers so there remains a requirement in the PRS for a "professional" assessment at the appropriate level of detail (and sensible cost).

by AlanR

17:35 PM, 21st October 2015, About 6 years ago

Jireh,

You have made a valid point - I agree, it's easy for some people to do LD assessments, but not for others. However, some of the landlord associations run LD courses for landlords - at a price of course, but if you are then able to do your own LD assessments you could save some cash in the long term.

by

14:16 PM, 22nd October 2015, About 6 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Alan Robinson" at "21/10/2015 - 17:35":

Of the courses being run to allow Landlords or Agents to be able to make the decision on whether they can ( in the majority of cases ) carry out their own Risk A's -
None are as competitively priced, nor I suggest have such Positive feedback, as
http://www.LandlordsMasterclass.com
But don't take my word for it, look at the feedback.
Chris


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