DIY Legionella Risk Assessment Reports for Just £9

DIY Legionella Risk Assessment Reports for Just £9

11:50 AM, 6th October 2015, About 6 years ago 71

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Landlords are under a legal duty of care to ensure that the risk of exposure to Legionella for tenants, residents and visitors to their properties is adequately assessed and controlled.

Landlords are obligated to have a risk assessment conducted out on their properties followed by subsequent periodic reviews. Provided that the property is low risk (which includes most residential settings including houses or flats with small domestic type water systems) there is no reason why the landlord should not carry out the risk assessment themselves.

With this in mind Property118 have negotiated an exclusive discount on the normal price of a Legionella Risk Assessment.

Please CLICK HERE and follow the step by step guide and use the form at the bottom of the page to produce your Legionella Risk Assessment for £8.95

Legionella Risk AssessmentAfter the Legionella Risk Assessment ‘do I need it or not’ debate, on October 1st the House of Commons Published a paper making the rules clear, stating “Specifically, landlords are obligated to have a risk assessment conducted out on their properties”

Tenants should be advised of any control measures put in place that should be maintained eg not to adjust the temperature setting of the calorifier, to regularly clean showerheads and tenants should inform the landlord if the hot water is not heating properly or there are any other problems with the system so that appropriate action can be taken.

Where showers are installed, these have the means of creating and dispersing water droplets (aerosols) which may be inhaled causing a foreseeable risk of exposure to Legionella. If used regularly (as in the majority of most domestic settings) the risks are reduced but in any case, tenants should be advised to regularly clean and disinfect showerheads. Instantaneous electric showers pose less of a risk as they are generally cold water-fed and heat only small volumes of water during operationLegionella Risk Assessment

A Legionella Risk Assessment is a legal requirement for all domestic properties which are rented to a tenant.

The purpose of a legionella risk assessment for your rental properties is to ensure that you have taken sufficient note of the possibility of legionella in your water system and to give practical advice to your tenants.

Most of the information you need to provide to your tenant will be contained in our prepopulated legionella risk assessment template.

Property118 have negotiated an exclusive discount on the normal price of a Legionella Risk Assessment.

Please CLICK HERE and follow the step by step guide and use the form at the bottom of the page to produce your Legionella Risk Assessment for £8.95



Comments

by Mike Wright

10:05 AM, 29th April 2016, About 6 years ago

Whilst I applaud all of you landlords out there that are engineers by trade or who have other relevant experience of mechanical plumbing systems, very few of the comments relating to the legionella risk assessment of your properties mention the type of people who may be living at the property or in the surrounding area to the property. The old saying of "A little bit of knowledge is dangerous" springs to mind. It just seems odd to me that as a landlord, you'd rather save yourself £100 by not using a suitably qualified and competent person to carry out a "suitable and sufficient" risk assessment. Why take the chance? I'd imagine that most of the engineers COULD fit a gas boiler but WOULD you? It's no different with assessing the legionella risk really.

by

16:16 PM, 2nd May 2016, About 6 years ago

Mike has a point, Certain properties ( the minority defintitely require a Specialist Company Risk assessment, for the majority, a Landlord can learn how to be Competent to carry out a Risk Assessment.

by AlanR

16:43 PM, 2nd May 2016, About 6 years ago

I'm a retired engineer and I do my own LRAs. However, for an old property with expansion tanks in the roof space, old dead-ended plumbing and all sorts of other horrors - yes, use a so-called "expert". Chose you expert carefully as some of them may have only done a basic competency course!!

For fairly modern 2/3 bed properties with simple combi boiler systems, DIY does it.

by Mike Wright

19:06 PM, 2nd May 2016, About 6 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Alan R" at "02/05/2016 - 16:43":

I assume you consider the users of the property and the surrounding area as well as the physical system? As well as usage of each outlet in day to day situation and times of low usage like holidays or vacant property? I'm just curious because almost every comment on here about legionella risk assessments are focused solely on the physical system and appear to only take it at face value with little or no thought to the "what if" scenario. This is why you pay the expert to do the risk assessment ? let's be honest....if you pay a tenner for a legal document, you get what you pay for !

by AlanR

20:00 PM, 2nd May 2016, About 6 years ago

My tenants get a copy of the RA together with a copy of a document giving health/safety advice on subjects such as minimum HW temperature (boiler thermostat setting), pre-use flushing of CW outlets (after property has been vacant due to holidays) and pre-use flushing of low-use CW outlets (garden hoses etc.).

I get my RA and related docs free from the RLA. If I owned an HMO or an old property with antiquated plumbing systems I might err on the side of CYA and use a third party but, for my properties, the docs I use together with my technical knowledge are perfectly adequate - in my opinion.

by

23:14 PM, 2nd May 2016, About 6 years ago

Alan - your documents sounds like its on the right track ? Care to share a copy / example ?

by B M

8:20 AM, 3rd May 2016, About 6 years ago

What qualifies a person as an expert in this field? I have been told that no qualifications are necessary to carry out these RA's???? If this is true, what's to stop any cowboy setting up a company and claiming to be 'competant'?? Isn't there a body that regulates this? Or a registry of certified risk assessment members legally entitled to carry out RA's???

by

9:42 AM, 3rd May 2016, About 6 years ago

Good morning 'B M ' sorry don't know your name,
Let me disclose my interest, I run a half-day Training course that gives suitable and suffient information, training and instruction to participants ( landlords and estate Agents that allows them to carry out a Risk assessment in the majority of Private rental Property.
The point you make about ' regulation' is that there isn't any, and nor would I encourage such ( there's enough regulation coming out of Govt for Landlords as it it is )
My stance is that for the majority of rental properties ( especially those without storage tanks ) are perfectly suitable to be Risk Assessed by a person who's had suitable information such as in a half-day course
I do acknowledge and convey in my course, circumstances [ possibly a large HMO with complicated water systems ] that a Company risk assessment may be prudent.
If there are specific questions about R.A;'s that you have that you'd like to discuss, I can be contacted through http://www.landlordsmasterclass.com although please feel free to respond through this thread.
Regards, Chris

by B M

11:45 AM, 3rd May 2016, About 6 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Chris Daniel" at "03/05/2016 - 09:42":

Hi Chris,
Many thanks for that.
So if I am aware that a person is carrying out LRA's without any qualifications or having attended any course at all, is this person breaking any law? They are doing the RA's on behalf of property management companies and letting agents.
Regards
Brian

by Mike Wright

14:07 PM, 3rd May 2016, About 6 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "B M" at "03/05/2016 - 11:45":

If the person can demonstrate they are competent, then they may not necessarily have a qualification....if the risk assessment can be deemed "suitable and sufficient" in relation to the risk of legionella, they would be ok.

The whole point of the assessment is to make sure people don't get ill or die, as well as making sure the landlord has fulfilled their legal requirement to assess the risk and then effectively manage the risk. As the ACoP used has special legal status, then there is a possibility that person could be breaking the law if they are not carrying out assessments properly.

That's kind of why I would avoid doing the assessment myself if I was a landlord, to be honest....:-)


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