Cats Protection’s Purrfect Landlords campaign does not ask for increased deposits

Cats Protection’s Purrfect Landlords campaign does not ask for increased deposits

14:37 PM, 15th May 2024, About 2 weeks ago 14

Text Size

The Cats Protection charity claims the Renters Reform Bill could end the ‘pet privilege’ where only those who own their home have the right to own a pet.

However, what they do not call for is the ability to charge an increased deposit over the maximum 5 weeks to cover the risk of property damage by cats whose urine is notoriously difficult to get the smell out of fabrics and carpets along with their propensity for sratching.

Consumer Rights Act 2015 already prohibits blanket pet bans

Currently, the Consumer Rights Act 2015 prohibits unfair terms in a contract such as a blanket ban on keeping pets in a tenancy. This means if a tenant requests a pet to be kept at the rental property and a refusal is deemed unreasonable the agreement might be struck out if challenged in court.

Cats Protection incorrectly say blanket ‘no pet’ policies are unfair and deny millions of animal lovers the chance to own a companion pet.

Senior Advocacy & Government Relations Officer for Cats Protection Annabel Berdy said: “We have an incredibly outdated and unfair approach when it comes to pets and renting the UK, where blanket ‘no pets’ policies are the norm. There doesn’t appear to be any sound basis for this, given the evidence that shows pet owners stay longer in their homes, and that the vast majority of pets cause no damage.

Refusing pets creates a ‘pet privilege’

“Refusing pets creates a ‘pet privilege’, where people who own their homes can benefit from the companionship of a pet but people in rented housing are either banned from pet ownership or will find it very difficult. Even if people do find rented housing that allows pets, they live in fear of a change in circumstances as they are fully aware of how difficult it will be to find another pet-friendly property. Renters pay a huge proportion of their income on fees and rent, so they should be able to treat that property as a home.

“Pet ownership is important to millions of people, helping us feel settled and providing companionship to all sorts of people. Many of us can recall our first childhood pet with great fondness – but the reality is that we are denying that special experience to a generation of children.”


Share This Article


Comments

Pamthomp33

15:02 PM, 15th May 2024, About 2 weeks ago

Landlords are reluctant to take pets due to increased risk of damage and no ability to be able to increase a deposit amount to cover the extra risk involved. There is talk of landlords being able to insist on pet insurance being taken out but this is riddled with issues - what are the terms of the insurance, the landlord could not claim against a policy in the tenant's name, what happens if tenant doesn't renew - could a landlord legitimately issue a Section 21?

Maybe some of these articles could start to blame inflexible government legislation. What about insurers, they always charge more for increased risk, so why can't landlords?

Reluctant Landlord

15:02 PM, 15th May 2024, About 2 weeks ago

"Renters pay a huge proportion of their income on fees and rent, so they should be able to treat that property as a home."

Errr no. Its a rental - owned by the person paying the mortgage, so the person named on the deeds decides the rules. That's the deal with renting.

Tenants CHOOSE to live according to the rules/contract offered...or they look for a property that can facilitate in full their wish list.

A private LL is not obligated to rent to anyone.

Cider Drinker

15:08 PM, 15th May 2024, About 2 weeks ago

I’d never explicitly allow cats without increasing the rent to cover the risk. I have (almost) no problem with dogs.

I accept that it is the tenants’ home. However, it is the owner that gets to pay for any clean up.

Ian Narbeth

15:53 PM, 15th May 2024, About 2 weeks ago

As a pet owner, I have sympathy for those wanting to keep a pet. However, the Government has chosen to interfere with freedom of contract and heavily penalises any landlord who, prudently and reasonably, asks for a higher deposit.

The courts and deposit adjudicators bend over backwards to reject landlords' claims (Can you prove the furniture wasn't covered in scratches and that the carpet and wallpaper didn't smell of tom cat at the start of the tenancy? "Oh, your photo doesn't show that. Claim rejected so, tough!")

Even if "the vast majority of pets cause no damage", so what? If a landlord is unfortunate enough to get one that does, it can take months to get the tenant out and the house restored and the landlord will lose out financially.

Message to MPs and Cats Protection: If you spend decades cultivating a general hatred and distrust of landlords, don't expect any favours.

Lee Chapman

10:49 AM, 16th May 2024, About 2 weeks ago

An unauthorised pet cat peed on every carpet in the house soaking the carpet, underlay and flooring.

Cost us loads which we were not able to get back from the Deposit.

Cider Drinker

11:24 AM, 16th May 2024, About 2 weeks ago

"Renters pay a huge proportion of their income on fees and rent, so they should be able to treat that property as a home."
It is worth noting that a huge proportion of the rent paid by tenants is spent on mortgage interest, repairs, unfair taxation, selective licensing and letting agent fees.
I could provide a ‘where does my rent go’ pie chart. It would show that for one property, there was no profit and a significant loss for another. Other properties make a very modest return because they are mortgage free; the return would be better if the money I invested was in a risk-free savings account.

Reluctant Landlord

13:48 PM, 16th May 2024, About 2 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by Cider Drinker at 16/05/2024 - 11:24
oooh a pie chart...you got me thinking....It might be good to provide one to tenant's who complain about a rent increase when one is made. Please see attachment to Form 4!

Steve

14:21 PM, 16th May 2024, About 2 weeks ago

Cats if they don't go outside will claw at things, I've had various cats over a 20 year period and even those that go outside cause damage.
Dogs are less of an issue as long as they're a sensible size.
Point is I'd love to be able to say yes but the costs of pets need to be covered by the tenant either by insurance or some statutory guarantee otherwise its an expensive mess to clean up

GlanACC

16:52 PM, 16th May 2024, About 2 weeks ago

I have tenants with pets, and YES dogs (small ones) cause less internal damage than cats as cats claw at everything. Having said that a number of my tenants have cats.

Dylan Morris

18:14 PM, 16th May 2024, About 2 weeks ago

“Tenants pay a huge proportion of their income on fees and rent”…..No they don’t tenants haven’t paid any fees since June 2019 when the Tenant Fees Act became law. They only pay rent.

1 2

Leave Comments

In order to post comments you will need to Sign In or Sign Up for a FREE Membership

or

Don't have an account? Sign Up

Landlord Tax Planning Book Now