Calls on government for a new landlord and tenant conciliation service

Calls on government for a new landlord and tenant conciliation service

0:01 AM, 2nd December 2020, About 6 months ago 9

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Private landlords are calling on the Government to establish a new landlord and tenant conciliation service as part of its planned changes to the private rented sector.

The call, being made by the National Residential Landlords Association, comes as it publishes its proposals for the Renters’ Reform Bill.

With the Government committed to abolishing section 21, or ‘no fault’ evictions as some describe them, the NRLA is calling for fundamental reforms to the rights of re-possession that are fair to both tenants and landlords.

The plans outline clear and comprehensive grounds upon which landlords should be able to regain possession of their properties. This includes cases of tenant rent arrears, anti-social behaviour and situations where landlords want to sell a property.

Where possession notices are challenged, the NRLA is calling for the creation of a new, publicly funded conciliation service, similar to the employment dispute body, ACAS. This would seek to resolve disagreements between landlords and tenants without the stress and costs associated with going to court.

Whilst more serious cases, such as those related to criminal activity by a tenant, would need to go straight to court, most could be considered by the conciliation service. This would help the tenant and landlord to reach an agreement to keep the tenancy going or bring the tenancy to an end in a way that works for both parties. Both tenants and landlords would be able to access the advice and support they needed to make their case.

Where landlords failed to abide by the terms of the agreement they would be banned from being able to re-possess the property using the same ground for six months. Where renters did so, the case would be fast tracked through the courts.

With possession cases taking many months to be considered and ruled on by the courts, the proposals announced today would reduce the workload on them ensuring they can more quickly consider and act upon cases that do come before them.

Ben Beadle, Chief Executive of the National Residential Landlords Association, said:

“As the Government prepares this important Bill, it needs to enjoy the full confidence of both landlords and tenants. Our proposals are for a fundamental reform of re-possession rights which strike the balance between the needs of both. The over-riding aim is to sustain tenancies wherever possible or bring them to an end in a collaborative way.

“We hope that ministers will accept our proposals and act on them soon.”

The NRLA is today hosting a webinar on its proposals. The speakers will be the Chair of the Housing Select Committee, Clive Betts MP, Conservative MP, Kevin Hollinrake, the Chief Executive of Crisis, Jon Sparkes and Ben Beadle, Chief Executive of the NRLA.



Comments

by user_ 7167

12:31 PM, 2nd December 2020, About 6 months ago

Obfuscated Data

by Luke P

13:35 PM, 2nd December 2020, About 6 months ago

Whenever I’ve been involved in mediation, it’s started with the figure I’m owed and then just a discussion on how low/how much less I’m willing to accept. I’m due *all* of the outstanding amount! The worst that happens for the tenant is they pay what’s due.

by TrevL

18:21 PM, 2nd December 2020, About 6 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Luke P at 02/12/2020 - 13:35
If your complaining that a mediation/consiliation service doesn't provide you everything your owed, you're kinda missing the point of what a mediation/consiliation service does.....

by Luke P

20:09 PM, 2nd December 2020, About 6 months ago

Reply to the comment left by TrevL at 02/12/2020 - 18:21
Why *should* we just be bartered down?

Perhaps I’m indirectly saying it’s completely (and morally) pointless.

I’d love to mediate the price of my shopping trolley each week…

by Cathie

20:19 PM, 2nd December 2020, About 6 months ago

TrevL the point of a mediation service is actually not to screw the landlord. They should get payment in full and the only discussions should be when and if the tenant stays during that period.

by TrevL

21:38 PM, 2nd December 2020, About 6 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Cathie Hawkins at 02/12/2020 - 20:19
Luke/Cathie, I appritiate what you saying that you would rightly want all your rent paid, but if it's got to mediation/consiliation, its all about damage limitation without the expense and time of going to court.....you can stick to your contract all you want and argue for full repayment all you want, but if the tenant doesn't have the money surely the pragmatic solution is getting what they can pay and ensuring a swift vacation of the property, hopefully with it in an undamaged condition.

by Luke P

22:42 PM, 2nd December 2020, About 6 months ago

Reply to the comment left by TrevL at 02/12/2020 - 21:38
I take a homeowner guarantor and never not get paid in full now. It’s because if the likes of mediation I did this. Now I simply ignore the tenant and granny pays up instead.

by Peter Lassman

12:00 PM, 3rd December 2020, About 6 months ago

Hi Luke what company do you use for this service or do you mean a Guarantor for the Tenant thank you Peter 😎 Reply to the comment left by Luke P at 02/12/2020 - 22:42Hi Luke P 😊 What company do you use for this service thank you Peter

by Luke P

12:07 PM, 3rd December 2020, About 6 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Peter Lassman at 03/12/2020 - 12:00
We use ourselves; our own company. Having volume we learnt the Courts system inside out. Every single tenant requires a home-owning guarantor. We also don’t wait until ‘finalisation’ before initiating Court action, rather making an application at a relatively early stage (after exhausting normal methods of communication with the tenant/guarantor) and then put in a second once the tenancy and amount is finalised at a later date (not that much resistance is put up by the guarantor after losing the first)…


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