Welsh government increases eviction notice from 3 to 6 months

by Property 118

16:31 PM, 27th July 2020
About A week ago

Welsh government increases eviction notice from 3 to 6 months

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Welsh government increases eviction notice from 3 to 6 months

The Welsh government has announced a temporary increase in the notice period for eviction in private rented and housing association accommodation in Wales. The change means that unless a tenant is being evicted on the grounds of anti-social behaviour, they will be entitled to six months’ notice instead of three. This will apply for all notices issued until at least the end of September.

Announcing the increase, Housing and Local Government Minister Julie James, said:

“Whilst the coronavirus outbreak is affecting everyone, we know it is having a more significant financial impact on some of the more vulnerable people in our society, many of whom are tenants in private rented accommodation.

“It is vital that no renter in Wales will be forced out of their home during this difficult time. These temporary changes will ensure fewer people will face eviction into homelessness at a time when local authorities are less able to respond to these situations; those renting their homes will have more security, and those at risk of eviction will have more time to get help to resolve any problems.”

While the changes only apply to those renting their homes from private landlords or housing associations, the Welsh Government is working with local authorities to ensure their tenants benefit from the same protection.

Work is also underway to ensure tenants are supported to repay any rent arrears that have occurred due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Julie James added: “While these changes offer greater protection to tenants, they are not an excuse for people not to pay their rent if they are able to, and address any financial problems they are experiencing. Having an early conversation with landlords to work out a way forward is vital, as is getting the right debt advice. We have recently invested an extra £1.4 million in advice services to ensure people have the help they need to build financial capability and to claim the benefits they are entitled to.”



Comments

Dr Rosalind Beck

9:48 AM, 28th July 2020
About 7 days ago

This is a disgraceful move by the Welsh Government - on top of 4 months already of an eviction ban, this means for many at least 10 months before even being able to go to court. It is a rogue tenant's dream - they can sit pretty and the landlord can do nothing. It will be disastrous for many landlords who rely on the income from their rental - and who chose not to put their hard-earned savings into shares or the bank, but in to providing homes for those who need to rent whether for job mobility or because that is the only way they can afford to live in a particular area.

The move is very damaging to the sector and most likely to lead in a drop in supply of homes when they are really needed. Councils, for instance, are trying to bribe landlords left. right and centre to take on the homeless and/or those on benefits as tenants. These won't get a look-in. It will be tenants with the greatest means, high credit scores and guarantors all the way as who can afford to lose what will effectively be around 18 months of no rent (because of court processes and delays) when a tenant decides not to pay? Guarantors will be crucial to avoid huge losses and the lowest-income families and individuals can't get them (coming from a poor family myself, I wouldn't be able to get a guarantor, so I know what I'm talking about).

This is ill-thought out, deluded policy from Drakeford and co, who really don't have a clue about what needs to be done to support a well-functioning PRS.

Beaver

9:50 AM, 28th July 2020
About 7 days ago

Question here: If you need to perform an electrical safety test to comply with the new rules but the tenant is not allowing you access do you issue them with some kind of notice 6 months prior to the end of the tenancy letting them know that they will be unable to continue renting, and if so, what notice do you issue them with to avoid falling foul of the regulations?

Hardworking Landlord

10:10 AM, 28th July 2020
About 7 days ago

Reply to the comment left by Dr Rosalind Beck at 28/07/2020 - 09:48
So basically our legally binding contracts that we have only now work in one way for the tenant. Landlords are simply excluded for being able to get justice. Surely at some point there is going to be a need for a class action to sort this out. Hard working individuals and their families who have rented out property are constantly being singled out and poorly treated in this country.

Happy Landlord

10:17 AM, 28th July 2020
About 7 days ago

I have been a landlord for well over 20 years with 30 plus properties - I live in Wales - the number of properties that I let in Wales is Nil for exactly this reason. The Welsh government is a dangerous nightmare even worse than England if that is possible. They are unable to see the consequence of their actions which actively increases rents and limits the number of properties available. I am being asked regularly if I have property for rent but not with the current Welsh government.

Jan Martin

12:58 PM, 28th July 2020
About 7 days ago

Reply to the comment left by Beaver at 28/07/2020 - 09:50
I believe that the electrician will guide you on this .I recall having a problem with access a while back .You will need proof that you have spoken with the tenant and tried to make appointments on at least 3 occasions. Next step is appling to the court . Didnt get to that stage with my tenant . Keep records and communicate with your tenant .

moneymanager

13:14 PM, 28th July 2020
About 7 days ago

"Work is also underway to ensure tenants are supported to repay any rent arrears that have occurred due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Work is also underway to ensure landlords are supported to repay any mortgage arrears that have occurred due to the coronavirus pandemic, eh?

moneymanager

13:17 PM, 28th July 2020
About 7 days ago

"those renting their homes will have more security, and those at risk of eviction will have more time to get help to resolve any problems.”

A 100% occupancy rate has dropped to 66% with a potential drop to 33% within two months; how long will it take lenders to reposses in a flat sales market and with no EWS1?

Gromit

13:25 PM, 28th July 2020
About 7 days ago

Reply to the comment left by Hardworking Landlord at 28/07/2020 - 10:10
Don't hold your breath waiting for the NRLA (aka MHCLG lap dog) to do anything.

michael@mjproperty.co.uk

18:30 PM, 28th July 2020
About 7 days ago

Whilst I fully appreciate that safety standards in private housing ( and social housing ) need to be put in place, once the Government and devolved governments start to stick their fingers in the private sector pie they will soon find out that this will come back and bite back. The private sector market has grown through consumer demand and not only because local authorities or housing associations have not built enough property. As the private sector we actually understand what the consumer wants which is why it has become so successful. Unfortunately we have become too successful for the left leaning politicians too tolerate and this particular housing minister ( juile james ) privately hates us so she will carry out any tactics to destroy us and our success.
This latest salvo at landlords in Wales is a truly dirty tactic, after all imagine if we didn't pay our council tax for 6 months and the local council was not allowed to do anything at at all? Or you walked into your local supermarket and just took what you wanted without paying for 6 months.
I am no legal expert but surely there must be some possibility of a legal challenge to this? Not that the newly formed NRLA is going to help , after all they thrive on making money from more and more legislation by providing expensive courses and products to fleece landlords.
Its a tough time to be a landlord but the demand is still there for good quality private rented accommodation so chin up guys its when things seems worst that you must not quit!

Chris @ Possession Friend

19:02 PM, 28th July 2020
About 7 days ago

Reply to the comment left by Beaver at 28/07/2020 - 09:50
No, you get an Injunction for Access ( we're doing one at the moment )

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