Welsh government increases eviction notice from 3 to 6 months

by Property 118

16:31 PM, 27th July 2020
About A week ago

Welsh government increases eviction notice from 3 to 6 months

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Welsh government increases eviction notice from 3 to 6 months

The Welsh government has announced a temporary increase in the notice period for eviction in private rented and housing association accommodation in Wales. The change means that unless a tenant is being evicted on the grounds of anti-social behaviour, they will be entitled to six months’ notice instead of three. This will apply for all notices issued until at least the end of September.

Announcing the increase, Housing and Local Government Minister Julie James, said:

“Whilst the coronavirus outbreak is affecting everyone, we know it is having a more significant financial impact on some of the more vulnerable people in our society, many of whom are tenants in private rented accommodation.

“It is vital that no renter in Wales will be forced out of their home during this difficult time. These temporary changes will ensure fewer people will face eviction into homelessness at a time when local authorities are less able to respond to these situations; those renting their homes will have more security, and those at risk of eviction will have more time to get help to resolve any problems.”

While the changes only apply to those renting their homes from private landlords or housing associations, the Welsh Government is working with local authorities to ensure their tenants benefit from the same protection.

Work is also underway to ensure tenants are supported to repay any rent arrears that have occurred due to the coronavirus pandemic.

Julie James added: “While these changes offer greater protection to tenants, they are not an excuse for people not to pay their rent if they are able to, and address any financial problems they are experiencing. Having an early conversation with landlords to work out a way forward is vital, as is getting the right debt advice. We have recently invested an extra £1.4 million in advice services to ensure people have the help they need to build financial capability and to claim the benefits they are entitled to.”



Comments

Chris @ Possession Friend

19:34 PM, 28th July 2020
About A week ago

Reply to the comment left by at 28/07/2020 - 18:30
I think your right in the medium-term Michael,
Every 'kick in the landlords back' means there's many times more Tenants from the perceived riskier element of renters that are going to find it increasingly harder to find property.
There will sadly be some innocent casualties amongst them that will have the pernicious Labour approach to thank. ( as what the Assembly likely see as 'Conservative voting landlords' who don't bear a second thought. )
Put simply, the Welsh Govt perceive they are acting in their voters best interests and sod the rest.
I think the Assembly will experience that classic Welsh phrase, ' What goes around, comes around.'
If landlords ( everywhere, especially in Wales ) can be selective in the categories of tenant they choose, we can fight back.

Whilst the notice period is 6 months, there are other avenues open, such as Money claims in the small courts. A CCJ is going to virtually guarantee that tenant shouldn't find another PRS property and more likely to end up in L.A Temp accommodation on B&B.
Reporting rental defaults to the Local Authority Housing is also encouraged. We have seen some strong examples of stern letters to tenants advising them to 'work with their landlord' as a willful neglect to pay rent will result in a decision of 'Intentional Homelessness' and no Housing duty will be owed by the L.A.

Ultimately, Local Govt ( Local Authorities ) are not Landlords friends, they are local arms of the Welsh government. Be civil to them to their face, as they are to you but its Time landlords protected their own interests.

Luke P

21:05 PM, 28th July 2020
About A week ago

Reply to the comment left by Chris @ Possession Friend at 28/07/2020 - 19:34
How long before State-allocated tenants with no deposit/guarantor requirement allowed and open-ended one-way tenancies?

Gromit

21:23 PM, 28th July 2020
About A week ago

Reply to the comment left by at 28/07/2020 - 18:30NRLA = MHCLG lapdog

Watch them all fall down

21:57 PM, 28th July 2020
About A week ago

Reply to the comment left by Beaver at 28/07/2020 - 09:50
Hi,

The latest electric safety test only apply to England, not Wales.

Beaver

9:12 AM, 29th July 2020
About A week ago

Reply to the comment left by Watch them all fall down at 28/07/2020 - 21:57
I wasn't aware of that. Out of curiosity, do you have any idea of the reason? Presumably gas safety certificates apply in Wales?

Beaver

9:13 AM, 29th July 2020
About A week ago

Reply to the comment left by Chris @ Possession Friend at 28/07/2020 - 19:02
So you can get an injunction for access despite Covid19?

Art Dobson

11:25 AM, 29th July 2020
About A week ago

I think this is a massive signpost we should all be aware of, the soon lanlords will be remembering the good old days when you could could rent a property with some security that if things go belly up you can move a tenant on. The outlook for making a crust off being a BTL landlord is not very optimistic.Nothing postive for landlords expected any time soon. The public really dislike us and it's being refeclted in govt policy.
I'm looking to get out of the Welsh and maybe English market soon, can't see a better option all it takes is a few voids or 1 nightmare tenant and you are in the red. Even worse if you are trying to shop around and remortgage, poor yielding properties don't assure any lender that you are a good choice of customer.
I am looking at taking my money and putting it in a mid risk stock investment, I did some maths and if I'd done it 3 years ago when I saw the market tighten on landlords i'd be up considerably, even with all the flux we've seen in the last 6 months.
Selling up before we see more landlord hostile CGT reforms is the only safe option to protect my wealth.

Chris @ Possession Friend

16:35 PM, 29th July 2020
About A week ago

Reply to the comment left by Beaver at 29/07/2020 - 09:13
YES

Rennie

10:03 AM, 1st August 2020
About 5 days ago

Reply to the comment left by Chris @ Possession Friend at 28/07/2020 - 19:34
I didn't know you could go to small claims court BEFORE evicting so this is good information for landlords who are in a fix because to be able to tell a tenant that they won't get anywhere to live if they have a CCJ could be very powerful.

Also the tip about writing to the local authority to put some pressure on to resolve the arrears is a great one

Thank you!

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