Shelter’s response to ONS homeless death figures

by Property118.com News Team

16:28 PM, 1st October 2019
About A year ago

Shelter’s response to ONS homeless death figures

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Shelter’s response to ONS homeless death figures

Two homeless people died every day in England and Wales last year. Today, the Office for National Statistics (ONS) has released new figures on the number of homeless people who died in England and Wales in 2018. The figures show:

• In 2018, an estimated 726 homeless people died in England and Wales, with 692 (95%) of those in England. This is the biggest annual increase (22%) since records began
• The number of estimated deaths in England and Wales has increased by 51% over the last five years (between 2013 and 2018)
• Last year, the areas with the highest numbers of estimated deaths were Birmingham (23), Newcastle (20), Manchester (19), Bristol (17) and Liverpool (16).
• There were 148 estimated deaths in London, the highest of any region*. This accounts for 20% of deaths in England and Wales.
• In 2018, the average age at death of homeless people was 45 for men and 43 for women. This is more than 30 years lower than the average age at death of the general population of England and Wales.

Polly Neate, chief executive of Shelter, said: “This is a moment to pause and reflect on what matters to us as a society. These tragic deaths are the consequence of a housing system and economy that is failing too many of our fellow citizens.

“We desperately need to set a new course, and to do that we need urgent action. You can’t solve homelessness without homes, so we are calling on all parties to commit to building the social homes we need to form the bedrock of a more humane housing system.”

Notes:

  • The number of homeless people who died in England and Wales is the estimated number of homeless people who died who were rough sleeping or living in emergency accommodation, such as shelters and hostels, at or around the time of death. The is available at ONS, Deaths of homeless people in England and Wales: 2018, Table 1.
  • Deaths of homeless people were identified from the death registration records held by ONS, and a statistical method of modelling was applied to estimate the most likely number of additional registrations not identified as homeless people. The method used provides a robust but conservative estimate, so the real numbers may be higher.
  • The number of homeless people who died in England and Wales increased from 597 in 2017 to 726 in 2018. The is available at ONS, Deaths of homeless people in England and Wales: 2018, Table 1
  • The number of homeless people who died every day last year is calculated by dividing the estimated number of homeless people who died in England and Wales in 2018 (726) by the number of days in a year.
  • The number of homeless people who died in England is the estimated number of homeless people who died who were rough sleeping or living in emergency accommodation, such as shelters and hostels, at or around the time of death. The is available at ONS, Deaths of homeless people in England and Wales: 2018, Table 6
  • The increase in the number of estimated deaths of homeless people in England and Wales is calculated by comparing data from 2018 with data from 2013. This is available at ONS, Deaths of homeless people in England and Wales: 2018, Table 1
  • The areas with the highest numbers of estimated deaths is from ONS, Deaths of homeless people in England and Wales: 2018, Table 7
  • Although London is a city, it is counted as a region because it is made up of 32 different local authorities. The region with the highest numbers of estimated deaths is from ONS, Deaths of homeless people in England and Wales: 2018, Table 6
  • The average age at death is the mean age at death of homeless people. This is available at ONS, Deaths of homeless people in England and Wales: 2018, Table 2
  • In the general population of England and Wales, the mean age at death was 76 years for men and 81 years for women. This is 31 years higher than the mean age at death for men and 38 years higher than the mean age at death for women. The mean age at death for the general population of England and Wales is available at ONS, Average age at death – by sex, UK

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Comments

Neil Patterson

16:30 PM, 1st October 2019
About A year ago

Absolutely correct Poly we do need more homes, but what are Shelter doing about that?

Neil Patterson

16:32 PM, 1st October 2019
About A year ago

There was also an increase in drug related homeless deaths. There is not always a direct correlation between housing availability and people with more specialist needs.

Martin Roberts

9:15 AM, 2nd October 2019
About A year ago

Absolutely, a time for Ms Neate to pause and reflect on what Shelter spend their £63 million annual income on.
You might think that amount could really help.

Gromit

10:36 AM, 2nd October 2019
About A year ago

Reply to the comment left by Martin Roberts at 02/10/2019 - 09:15Shelter currently spend £m's on campaigning/lobbying against Landlords which drives rents up and Landlords to sell-up both of which result in higher homelessness.
Shelter should think hard about working with Landlords and not always against them.

Janet Carnochan

11:00 AM, 2nd October 2019
About A year ago

Reply to the comment left by Neil Patterson at 01/10/2019 - 16:32
I totally agree with you Neil on both counts. Yes, what is Shelter doing about it, however I also don't think that it is an simple as just building more social housing. Many suffer from drug problems and mental health issues. All those issues need to be looked at to find a solution. I have watched some documentaries about homelessness in the countryside ( and cities will be no different ) and many who have been interviewed have been offered accommodation but can't deal with people, noise or every day life. Yes the figures are shocking and nobody should have to live on the streets, but it is a bigger problem than just building more houses. Glad to see that Polly did not find a way to blame PRS as we are not experienced enough to deal with this issue. However they should be supporting the PRS as by making it attractive as possible as that may free up homes in the social sector, however that would have to be backed up with the correct support.

Chris @ Possession Friend

12:26 PM, 2nd October 2019
About A year ago

Quite perverse of Shelter ! ( no surprises there
)

Calling for 3 Million extra homes, And at same time
-

To campaign for abolition of Section 21 with a loss of 1 million homes, AND less housing for those who find it harder to rent.

colette

15:14 PM, 3rd October 2019
About A year ago

Having worked many years in this sector referring to homeless deaths gives the public the impression they died simply because they were homeless. I never found this to be the case in the hundreds I dealt with and the groups I was involved with. Most die because of substance or alcohol abuse and would have died regardless of whether they had a roof over theirr head or not. Those with mental health issues and not addictions were in a similar situation.


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