Property passports to help landlords prove their homes are compliant

Property passports to help landlords prove their homes are compliant

10:34 AM, 24th May 2022, About 3 months ago 39

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The NRLA are calling for new property passports to help landlords prove their homes are compliant and tenants identify decent and safe housing.

Under plans devised by the National Residential Landlords Association (NRLA), such passports would certify that a property met all legal standards. It would list improvements made to properties and contain copies of all safety certificates. Tenants would be able to access the passport online.

Local authorities would be able to conduct spot checks to verify the passport is a true record of the state of the property. For social sector landlords, an independent organisation would have the power to check that local authorities have conducted assessments correctly.

The Government has proposed that the existing Decent Homes Standard should be extended to apply to the private rented sector, not just social housing.

The NRLA argues this should be tailored to the private rented sector and bring together the 168 pieces of legislation already affecting it rather than introducing new requirements. What is needed is a standard that simplifies the measures that already exist and can be easily understood by tenants and landlords alike.

According to official statistics, the vast majority of private landlords already provide decent housing. 88% of private rented properties in England have none of the most serious ‘Category One’ hazards whilst almost 94% have no damp problems. Most (83%) private renters are satisfied with their accommodation, a higher proportion than in the social rented sector.

The NRLA remains concerned about the minority of landlords who provide unsuitable housing who damage the reputation of responsible landlords who comply with regulations.

Ben Beadle, Chief Executive of the NRLA said: “We want to make it easier for the vast majority of compliant landlords to prove to tenants what they already do, namely providing decent and safe housing. Those who do not would have no option other than to shape up or ship out.

“This would be based on proving compliance with existing laws, not creating new regulations. With almost 170 laws affecting the private rented sector it can hardly be dubbed the wild west. What is needed is better understanding and enforcement of this existing legislation.”



Comments

Suresh Parikh

11:13 AM, 24th May 2022, About 3 months ago

Another money making exercise, cost to be borne by the truly rich and wicked landlord.
If the sixth paragraph is correct, then there is no need for such a scheme.
Most tenants are demanding and discerning, and will select quality accommodation.
Landlords usually satisfy what the tenants want and what the legislation requires.

Luke P

11:17 AM, 24th May 2022, About 3 months ago

I do not want the NRLA too speak on my behalf, nor that of any LLs any longer. How do we stop their (damaging) voice??

Clint

11:35 AM, 24th May 2022, About 3 months ago

NRLA seem to act for the likes of Shelter and are by no means an organisation supporting Landlords. Pity there are no big strong organisations to represent Landlords. All the representing organisations seem to have been engulfed by the NRLA so there is no voice for the landlords.
Perhaps the time has come for a new Landlord organisation

Monty Bodkin

11:39 AM, 24th May 2022, About 3 months ago

From the NRLA news release;

https://www.nrla.org.uk/news/nrla-calls-for-property-passports-to-crackdown-on-sub-standard-housing

Landlords are calling for new property passports to help landlords prove their homes are compliant and tenants identify decent and safe housing.

I'm certainly not calling for it.

Darren Peters

13:06 PM, 24th May 2022, About 3 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Clint at 24/05/2022 - 11:35
Took the words out of my mouth.

Are the NRLA, in the interests of balance also asking for Tenant passports that confirm tenants are decent and safe?

Chris @ Possession Friend

13:08 PM, 24th May 2022, About 3 months ago

Why does an organisation that is supposedly representing landlords ( but in-bed with the Govt, like they aquiesced to EICR's Only for PRS ) shoot Landlords in the foot ?

DSR

13:46 PM, 24th May 2022, About 3 months ago

prove their homes are compliant and tenants identify decent and safe housing.,,

We have to give them all the certs before AND a tenant normally views the property before and agrees the inventory. The law says we have to do this already - WTF is a 'passport' going to do? Nothing! only add more paperwork and up the rent bill..

LordOf TheManor

14:21 PM, 24th May 2022, About 3 months ago

Who is going to take responsibility for keeping the data up to date as new certificates are obtained???

NRLA: you're trying to introduce yet another needless layer of bureacratic tosh!! Why are you being such a glove puppet? Whose hand is up your proverbial jacksy??

LaLo

15:48 PM, 24th May 2022, About 3 months ago

The punishment is so harsh if things aren’t correct eg. 5 years in prison- unlimited fines if ‘right to rent’ isn’t done correctly!! Info on government site!

Clint

16:10 PM, 24th May 2022, About 3 months ago

I feel I have to add this hoping that the NRLA see what they should be concentrating on.
Councils already have environmental health departments for the compliant purposes suggested by the NRLA and they are very thorough when checking out properties. If a tenant is unhappy with the quality of the property provided, they just inform the council who immediately arranges to check out the property after which, the Landlord is given a list of works that has to be carried out within a specified time.
I at present have a tenant who has done just that where, she herself has actually caused the damage. The council have served me with a notice of works to be carried out, but the tenant who raised the complaint has not only prevented me from gaining access to the property to carry out the works but, has also stopped paying the rent and at present is three months in arrears.
The tenant is a benefit tenant and consequently, I applied for the rent from UC three times (as two of my applications were ignored) for the rent to be paid directly to me. UC have just sent me a standard email stating the reasons which, are not at all helpful as to why they cannot pay the rent to me. As after two months of rent being owed, UC should be paying the rent to me, I can only assume that the tenant is holding on to two properties as, she had told me that she had another flat which, she was moving to about two months ago but has not.
I served the tenant with a section 8 notice as well as a section 21 notice yesterday.
Surely, the NRLA should be fighting for the rights for Landlords to protect them from such tenants rather than creating more red tape for landlords who, are already overwhelmed with paperwork.

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