Help bathroom refit – No bath?

by Readers Question

10:15 AM, 5th May 2015
About 4 years ago

Help bathroom refit – No bath?

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Help bathroom refit – No bath?

I am letting a small one bed house and the bathroom needs replacing. It is very small so I was thinking of replacing the bath with walk in shower cubicle and floor to ceiling tiling.

Do you think a bathroom with no bath would put people off renting

Thanks

Johnbath



Comments

Martin Rdg

12:00 PM, 5th May 2015
About 4 years ago

I find that professional tenants prefer showers and always remove baths when renovating a bathroom but I do install a good quality shower.

Peter Johnson

12:22 PM, 5th May 2015
About 4 years ago

Hi,

I had a similar situation and was renting to a family with 4 children and mother but I went for the largest shower cubicle I could fit and that worked fine, I had no problem but as previous post said I went for a good quality shower

Dr Rosalind Beck

13:23 PM, 5th May 2015
About 4 years ago

As much as I love a bath myself, I am reliably informed that most people don't care and prefer a shower. If it was a 'family house' I would always leave a bath in as I think getting rid of it devalues the house, but for a one bed house I would think it is fine - especially if you are letting it long term. When you come to re-sell you could always put a bath back in if that was what the sales market dictated.

Joe Bloggs

15:10 PM, 5th May 2015
About 4 years ago

most tilers dont tile shower areas properly and leaks result. tiles must be fully bedded in waterproof adhesive on render or aqua panels, NOT plasterboard or gypsum plaster.

John Walker

16:31 PM, 5th May 2015
About 4 years ago

I have several one-bedroomed flats with only showers. No trouble with leaks through tiling if well bedded in w/proof adhesive and w/proof grout on 12mm. plasterboard, but do use plastic beading at corners and around wall/shower tray junction. I would reiterate previous comments about using good quality showers plus enclosures with doors rather than curtains.

Michael Barnes

19:14 PM, 5th May 2015
About 4 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Joe Bloggs" at "05/05/2015 - 15:10":

Based on my tiling training and experience, I believe that there is no such thing as a "waterproof adhesive"; they are "water resistant" which means "water may penetrate but the adhesive will not deteriorate".

Therefore what is needed is application of a "tanking" system before tiling.
"tanking" is essentially a waterproof coating that is painted on to the walls and floor

Joe Bloggs

20:00 PM, 5th May 2015
About 4 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Michael Barnes" at "05/05/2015 - 19:14":

there you go:
http://www.wickes.co.uk/Wickes-Waterproof-Wall-Tile-Adhesive-15L/p/166351

not too difficult to find!

the tiles are in effect the 'tanking'. however, for the tiles to be sound long term, they need the correct substrate which i have already explained.

if the tiling and substrate are correct there is no need for any substrate 'tanking'.

Joe Bloggs

20:13 PM, 5th May 2015
About 4 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "John Walker" at "05/05/2015 - 16:31":

funny.

we have mr walker advocating a substrate of plasterboard which is far from waterproof (in fact easily damaged by water) and will flex if studs too far apart thus causing grout to crack.

on the other hand we have mr barnes advocating 'tanking'.

well thats a wide range of diametrically opposite viewpoints in just 2 posts!

Jonathan Clarke

1:41 AM, 6th May 2015
About 4 years ago

I personally would keep the bath and put shower over it.
You have the best of both worlds then
.

John Walker

16:02 PM, 6th May 2015
About 4 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Michael Barnes" at "05/05/2015 - 19:14":

in reply to previous posts, in my former home I had no trouble with tiling on plasterboard in 23 years, one of these showers was in use daily by myself, and in my current home no problems after 18 months. The flats rented out could potentially offer more of a problem, but after 30 years none have arisen. Admittedly the studs are not over-spanned, but a second layer of 12mm. plasterboard may well overcome this problem if the studs are secure and sound.

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