Government look to throw landlords under the bus with 3 year tenancies

by Property 118

9:15 AM, 2nd July 2018
About A year ago

Government look to throw landlords under the bus with 3 year tenancies

Make Text Bigger
Government look to throw landlords under the bus with 3 year tenancies

The government has released to the BBC and other selected journalists that it intends to hold a consultation considering making the shortest term tenancy in England 3 years with a 6 month break clause for tenants.

The consultation is due to start this week and run until 26th August.

Communities Secretary, James Brokenshire, said to the BBC: “It is deeply unfair when renters are forced to uproot their lives or find new schools for their children at short notice due to the terms of their rental contract.

“Being able to call your rental property your home is vital to putting down roots and building stronger communities.”

He then told the Mail that under the proposed reforms, tenants would be able to leave before the end of the minimum term, but would have greater protection if they wanted to stay for an extended period.

By the Governments very own figures the average tenancy length is over 4 years so why take away nearly all flexibility? Only normally the worse tenants are served a section 21 by landlords. Do politicians still want the Private sector to house the tenants that the state can’t accommodate?

John Healey, Shadow Housing Secretary said: “Any fresh help for renters is welcome but this latest promise is meaningless if landlords can still force tenants out by hiking up the rent.”

Healey also added that Labour plans for the PRS included controls on rents, an end to no fault evictions (ie. section 21) and even more protection against substandard properties.

As easily predicted Shelter waded in with Polly Neate saying: “This is an important step forward. Losing a tenancy is the main driver of homelessness and also causes huge instability for renting families so everyone who rents will be very pleased to see a move towards longer tenancies, but if the government really wants to stand up and provide stability for renters, they can and should go beyond three years to provide real protection from eviction, and the huge upheaval of having to move home, jobs and schools.

“The government needs to bring forward new legislation quickly with tens of thousands of families already homeless and many more at risk of the same fate, we simply cannot wait.”



Comments

Ian Narbeth

17:07 PM, 11th July 2018
About A year ago

Reply to the comment left by Chris Daniel at 11/07/2018 - 15:44
Chris
I was answering john mcghee's specific question. I don't like what the Government is doing any more than you do. I believe in freedom of contract but landlords already have severe limitations placed upon us. Saying that life, the law, the Government is unfair, inequitable or whatever will get us nowhere. My view is that unless landlords lobby effectively we will not get anything good out of Government and will just get more bad medicine.

I am meeting with two Tory MPs at the end of this month and will put the case that IF such legislation is brought in, there needs to be a quid pro quo of making it easier to get bad tenants out. I would rather it were easier now but it isn't and matters are unlikely to change unless there is political will.

David Price

11:08 AM, 30th July 2018
About A year ago

Reply to the comment left by Ian Narbeth at 09/07/2018 - 19:07
Point 4, I believe that the Distress for Rent Act 1737 section 18 is still valid, this permits double rent in the circumstances which you describe.
Most of the rest of the act has been repealed.

Mark Alexander

11:24 AM, 30th July 2018
About A year ago

I have started a petition on 38 degrees - please sign and share.

LINK >>> https://you.38degrees.org.uk/petitions/competition-will-increase-the-quality-of-housing-of-all-tenures

Ian Narbeth

15:18 PM, 30th July 2018
About A year ago

Reply to the comment left by David Price at 30/07/2018 - 11:08
Thanks David I am aware of that section and would certainly point it out to a tenant. However, it is not clear in law that exercising a break clause is the same as giving a notice to quit the Act refers to. I'd like to have the matter cleared up by clear wording in the legislation.

David Price

15:21 PM, 30th July 2018
About A year ago

Reply to the comment left by Ian Narbeth at 30/07/2018 - 15:18Have a chat with H G Wells, he might lend you his time machine to go back to 1737 and clarify the act! Take care not to go forward as you may encounter the Morlocks.

terry sullivan

7:17 AM, 31st July 2018
About A year ago

Reply to the comment left by Monty Bodkin at 03/07/2018 - 09:29
ons is clueless--UK popn=at least 90 million

Luke P

8:56 AM, 31st July 2018
About A year ago

Reply to the comment left by terry sullivan at 31/07/2018 - 07:17
I can quite well believe it, Terry. But where does that figure come from?

1 9 10

Leave Comments

Please Log-In OR Become a member to reply to comments or subscribe to new comment notifications.

Forgotten your password?

OR

BECOME A MEMBER

Police blamed for allowing Anarchy to rule in the PRS

The Landlords Union

Become a Member, it's FREE

Our mission is to facilitate the sharing of best practice amongst UK landlords, tenants and letting agents

Learn More