Concerned about offering tenancy to someone so young?

Concerned about offering tenancy to someone so young?

15:54 PM, 17th May 2021, About a month ago 28

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I have had an application from a very young lady (only just 18, but she is due a baby within the month) for a two-bed flat with her partner. While she has the Rent In Advance & Deposit, I am wary that if the partner leaves her, she won’t be able to afford the rent on her own as she would only then be entitled to a one-bed, and she can’t make up the difference on her own.

I am assuming each of them needs to provide a separate guarantor on this possible joint tenancy? (as either one could essentially leave the other)

I am generally a bit concerned about offering any tenancy to someone so young. Has anyone been in the same position? Advice??

DSR



Comments

by Dylan Morris

11:53 AM, 18th May 2021, About a month ago

You already have doubts about these prospective tenants. My advice would be to find somebody else more suitable. Especially as Mom is only 18 and therefore has no credit history.

by Ian Narbeth

12:07 PM, 18th May 2021, About a month ago

If you proceed you need to ensure that the young woman and her partner are jointly and severally liable under the tenancy and that the guarantors guarantee the "Tenant" i.e. the two of them and not just one of them. The guarantee should be unlimited in time, i.e. it continues even after the contractual term ends. You should explain in writing to the guarantors that they are responsible for the obligations under the tenancy if there is a default and that it does not matter if their relative is in default or not. Even if, say the male moves out both "his" guarantor and "her" guarantor will be liable. Many people assume otherwise and they need to be disabused of their assumptions.
The courts bend over backwards to relieve guarantors of liability so if you don't know the ins and outs of guarantees get some professional help.

by Dylan Morris

12:36 PM, 18th May 2021, About a month ago

From the tenants’ prospective wouldn’t they simply be better off applying for a council property ? I assume the Council don’t ask for guarantors.

by Robert Mellors

12:44 PM, 18th May 2021, About a month ago

Reply to the comment left by Dylan Morris at 18/05/2021 - 12:36
Many local authorities don't even have any council housing, they were all sold off under Right to Buy, and what remained was sold off to housing associations. Some councils do retain some council housing stock. The waiting lists are horrendously long, often over 10 years, and the "bedroom tax" has made the waiting lists for the smaller 1 and 2 bedroom properties far longer as households are having to move from the larger family homes once their children have gown up and left. - Yes, you are right about councils not asking for guarantors, but if the applicant is expecting a baby within the next month or so, then waiting 10 years for an offer of a council house may be a bit too long of a wait.

by DSR

12:59 PM, 18th May 2021, About a month ago

Hmmm, I think on reflection (and other comments) this is a non starter. I have serious doubts if either sets of parents are credible guarantors and the time alone sorting this out and making sure they all know what they are getting themselves into just blows my mind.
Other issue is baby isn't here yet - and I know there are benefit rules about that too, so all in all when there is a queue of people waiting already with better more credible references to take on my property, it seems best to go for the less time consuming/better referenceable option.

by Dylan Morris

13:59 PM, 18th May 2021, About a month ago

Wouldn’t it have been more sensible for this couple to get themselves a property first then have a baby ?

by Ian Narbeth

14:23 PM, 18th May 2021, About a month ago

Reply to the comment left by DSR at 18/05/2021 - 12:59
Wise thinking. It is sometimes tempting to take a tenant but the trouble caused by a problem tenant will far outweigh a slightly longer void. We have on a couple of occasions rented to 18/19 year olds and regretted it both times. They are generally not very responsible. The fact the woman is pregnant at 18 tells you something.

by Paul Shears

15:02 PM, 18th May 2021, About a month ago

Exactly!

by DSR

15:15 PM, 18th May 2021, About a month ago

Reply to the comment left by Dylan Morris at 18/05/2021 - 13:59
hahahahah! of course! but that's the sensible approach isn't it... 😉

by Christopher Rogal

16:08 PM, 18th May 2021, About a month ago

Reply to the comment left by Smartermind at 18/05/2021 - 09:42
Guarantors are definitely useful, but I think they’re a back-stop.

In my experience, tenants need to look plausible in their own right. Relationships at that age, and with the pressure of a baby added in, are not very stable.

I think I’d ask what support structure the girl has available to her.


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