288,539 empty houses in the UK

288,539 empty houses in the UK

9:56 AM, 1st September 2021, About 4 weeks ago 4

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As it stands, there are currently 288,539 empty houses in the UK and 68% of Brits believe they should be used to help target the nation’s homelessness crisis1; new research reveals. The research, conducted by  GoodMove using data from Gov.UK 2, reveals how many empty houses there really are in the UK, as well as public perception on these empty dwellings.

This interactive heat-style map showcases the areas across the UK with the emptiest houses. Of the 288,539 empty dwellings in the UK, 215,625 of them (75%) are in England, 47,333 are in Scotland (16%), while 25,581 are in Wales (9%).

And the top 10 areas with the most empty houses in the UK, are revealed as follows:

  1. North West England (39,769)
  2. Yorkshire & Humber (28,071)
  3. South East (27,743)
  4. London (22,481)
  5. West Midlands (22,120)
  6. East England (19,950)
  7. East Midlands (19,664)
  8. South West (19,148)
  9. North East (17,769)
  10. Edinburgh (7,152)

Of the top 10 empty dwellings in the UK, 90% are in England – with Edinburgh just making up the top 10.

The top two areas in the UK with the most empty dwellings are in Northern England – the North West and Yorkshire & Humber, with over 67,000 empty dwellings between them. South East England has over 27,000 empty homes, while our Capital has over 22,000.

Empty homes tend to raise conversation about homelessness in the UK, which is an ever-prominent issue. Shelter estimates that one in every 200 people in the UK are homeless3, and as of 31st December 2020, there were 95,370 British households in temporary accommodation4.

And while many empty dwellings are unsafe or simply unfeasible to renovate into accommodation, nearly seven in 10 (68%) Brits surveyed felt that empty dwellings should be used to house homeless people.

Commenting on this research, Nima Ghasri chartered surveyor and director at GoodMove says: “It’s really interesting to see the number of empty houses in the UK, and that the vast majority of them are also situated in England. Empty dwellings vary from an abandoned house to a completely derelict building and of course not all of them are safe to be lived in, or even economically viable to be renovated into liveable properties. But with nearly seven in 10 Brits believing these empty houses could be used to accommodate homeless people in the UK, it raises a very important and interesting issue.”

To find out more about this research, including how Scotland and Wales fare, please visit:Empty Housing Hotspots | Interactive Map | Good Move.

  1. Survey of 1,000 Brits undertaken in July 2021 by TLF
  2. Data compiled by Gov.UK Commons Library, Stats Wales and Gov Scot
  3. Stat taken from Big Issue/Shelter
  4. Stat taken from Gov.UK statutory homeless release


Comments

by Beaver

10:45 AM, 1st September 2021, About 4 weeks ago

So...what's the breakdown of these "empty dwellings"? Are some of them empty just because they are being renovated?

And presumably some of these dwellings are empty because they don't have an EICR, gas safety certificate, or an EPC at a level that would make them rentable by a private landlord.

by Layla .

11:16 AM, 1st September 2021, About 4 weeks ago

I've got a great idea!
All those that think these should be used to house the homeless should chip in and crowdfund it.
Thought not.....

by Mick Roberts

7:57 AM, 4th September 2021, About 3 weeks ago

Brilliant words Beaver & Layla.
Yes many more be empty soon with the new EPC rules coming in. Better to live in a house with EPC F than on the street.

And yes, those that say we should do this & that with our houses don't want to put their own money in.

by LaLo

12:12 PM, 4th September 2021, About 3 weeks ago

The day is coming - when a house is empty for more than say - 3 months, it'll be taken over by the council to houses the homeless. Mark my words - its coming!!


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