Only 54% of non-portfolio landlords aware of EPC requirements for 2025

Only 54% of non-portfolio landlords aware of EPC requirements for 2025

10:39 AM, 22nd February 2022, About 3 months ago 11

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Buy to let portfolio landlords are more likely to be aware of the government’s proposed EPC requirements than non-portfolio landlords, according to new research by Landbay.

From 2025, all rental properties with new tenancies must have an EPC rating of at least C and for existing tenants, landlords must comply by 2028.

The survey found that 80% of buy-to-let portfolio landlords with 10 or more properties and 70% of those with four to 10 properties are aware of the government’s EPC requirements. But only 54% of non-portfolio landlords with one to three properties knew about the proposals.

When asked about upgrading their property to reach the required minimum EPC rating of C, most landlords said they would wait until 2025 to carry out necessary work. A third of larger landlords (35%) with 10 or more properties were willing to upgrade sooner, but only 20% of smaller portfolio and non-portfolio landlords said the same.

Paul Brett, managing director, intermediaries at Landbay, said: “It is not surprising that most professional landlords are aware of the EPC rating changes that are due to start in 2025. Buy-to-let investment is their business, and most are hands-on landlords.

“However, awareness among smaller landlords is much lower and although they have another four years to make any upgrades to properties, they should really know what is coming down the line.

“With an uptick in remortgaging due this year, brokers should take the opportunity to ask their landlord clients if they are aware of these new EPC rules. Clients will appreciate their broker showing an interest in them beyond just the mortgage by demonstrating a wider knowledge of the buy-to-let market.”



Comments

by Seething Landlord

12:13 PM, 22nd February 2022, About 3 months ago

Why is it that organisations that should know better are constantly asserting that the proposals contained in the consultation to which Government has not yet responded will pass into law unchanged?

How would anyone in their right mind spend money with the sole intention of meeting the assumed requirements of regulations that have not yet been published?

by John

11:55 AM, 23rd February 2022, About 3 months ago

I swallowed it last summer, but was doing a full fit out.

Decided to rip out all the internal victorian studded lath and plaster wall to put back with batons and 50mm celotex and plaster board. Cost me £1500 extra but i decided to do it.

All because of the EPC changes coming down the line. It now gets a C rating, so i am happy.

Will i loose out. Well the flat is now pretty well insulated and i hope going forward in the long term it will pay off with a lower turnover of tenant. With the energy rises coming I just cannot see how improving insulation is going to be a negative.

Got my notification from B gas yesterday saying the standing charge on my electric meter is doubling from £100 to £200 per yr !!!!

So across the land it looks like everyone is going to be paying £400 standing charge for the 2 basic services. Amazing. Then you have the new KWH prices to work with., 32p for electric now. Not sure on gas as this is all electric.

These fuel price increases are going to have BIG implications for LL's. The demand for improved energy efficiencies is going to push us all to provide more expansive insulation measures and solar.

by Seething Landlord

12:01 PM, 23rd February 2022, About 3 months ago

Reply to the comment left by John at 23/02/2022 - 11:55
I agree that there are many good reasons for making improvements. That's why I said "with the sole intention".

by Kirti Roser

12:02 PM, 23rd February 2022, About 3 months ago

What about the majority of main residential properties, how are the powers to be going to make owners even look at getting an EPC done other than the reason to sell?
Is the same regulation applicable to properties being sold for main residence?
Yet again LL are being penalised for assisting government to aid with providing housing!

by Chris Bradley

22:32 PM, 23rd February 2022, About 3 months ago

I did a full refurb on a dorma bungalow, including changing out the flat roofs on the dorma and replacing with insulation slabs before putting on the new covering.

New boiler, new everything and the property is one point of a C rating, not sure what else I can do other than knock down and build as a house, which isn't permitted on the freehold for the property.

Guess it need selling

by Katy Ann

5:30 AM, 24th February 2022, About 3 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Seething Landlord at 22/02/2022 - 12:13
I completely agree. I’m not sure why Property118’s News Team have thought it helpful to run an article stating that: “ From 2025, all rental properties with new tenancies must have an EPC rating of at least C and for existing tenants, landlords must comply by 2028.” The government haven’t yet published their consultation response, let alone legislated, so to describe the proposals as ‘requirements’ is not accurate. (And even if the proposal had passed into law, the description's wrong: the proposed 2028 requirement would apply to new tenancies, not necessarily new tenants).

by DSR

20:20 PM, 25th February 2022, About 3 months ago

The way its going most tenants will have no choice than to stay where they are so that means there will be a bit of breathings space for meeting a compliance date.
After that they can object to having any work carried out in the property while they are there as they feel it is too disruptive. If you cant get over the C line with the basics like LED light replacements or upping the loft insulation, then they can object to you saying it can happen after they have left (especially if you explain the measures proposed will ultimately push up the rent too). You get the exemption for 5 years (or until the tenant leaves). At that point you can then sell vacant, or carry out what is needed then to get it over the line with the rent increased from the start of a new tenancy.

by DSR

20:27 PM, 25th February 2022, About 3 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Chris Bradley at 23/02/2022 - 22:32
my advice - grill the EPC assessor. Ask for clarification on every bloody point before they formally log the cert. Even a metre floorspace over can make the difference as can the water capacity of a boiler. Get the boiler manual out and scan that to the assessor. They make assumptions to fit into the algorythm.
I;ve been so on the ball on my last renovation - I got three D's to three C's in the end - and a few points into the C to boot.

by Chris Bradley

21:12 PM, 25th February 2022, About 3 months ago

Reply to the comment left by DSR at 25/02/2022 - 20:27
Decided to just stick it on the market. 5 more homeless once it sells

by Graeme Paton

20:28 PM, 26th February 2022, About 3 months ago

In the EPC do both parts have to be C rating or just the energy Efficiency Rating part?
If only the first part is required what is the point of the Environmental report?
I asked a registered EPC provider and they were not sure.

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