New Government powers to ban landlords and additional HMO regulations

New Government powers to ban landlords and additional HMO regulations

9:17 AM, 29th December 2017, About 4 years ago 44

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From April 2018 any landlord convicted for the criminal offences of blackmail, theft,  handling stolen goods, harassment and stalking will automatically be banned from letting out property and added to the new rogue landlords database.

In addition Housing Minister, Alok Sharma, has introduced new HMO regulations set to be passed by Parliament confirming all properties occupied by 5 or more people from 2 or more separate households will face mandatory licensing.

The new HMO regulations will include:

  • Minimum bedroom size requirements (to prevent overcrowding). Rooms used for sleeping by a single adult will have to be no smaller than 6.51sqm, and those occupied by two adults will have to measure at least 10.22sqm. Rooms slept in by children of 10 years and younger will have to be at least 4.64sqm in size.
  • Responsibility falling on landlords to ensure the council’s rules on refuse and recycling are adhered to.
  • Additional powers to be given to local authorities for cracking down on over-crowded and sub-standard homes.

The government has estimated this will bring 160,000 into the licensing regime.

Alok Sharma said: “Every tenant has a right to a safe, secure and decent home, but far too many are being exploited by unscrupulous landlords who profit from providing overcrowded, squalid and sometimes dangerous homes.

“Enough is enough, and so I’m putting these rogue landlords on notice. Shape up or ship out of the rental business. Through a raft of new powers we are giving councils the further tools they need to crack down these rogue landlords and kick them out of the business for good.”

The RLA policy on this was previously spelt out by David Smith saying: “Councils are already struggling to enforce licensing schemes and the extension will potentially triple the number of homes under mandatory licensing.

“What is the point in introducing extra regulations if there are no resources to enforce them?

“Tenants should not be forced into excessively small rooms, but there are cases where tenants have other space available within their properties, which should be taken into account. By concentrating so narrowly on bedroom size the Government could knock thousands of rooms out of the sector, potentially forcing tenants out of their homes.”

**EDITORS NOTE**

The image previously used in connection with this article has been amended following complaints. No offence was ever intended. An apology has been published via https://www.property118.com/apology-auschwitz-memorial-auschwitzmuseum/



Comments

by AA

18:04 PM, 1st January 2018, About 4 years ago

"Minor " offences 5 years and no requirement to disclose but I understand the ASBO act somehow managed to include the provisions of the exceptions order so we as landlords have to disclose all offences even if they are time expired. 1984 comes to mind.

by matchmade

16:08 PM, 8th January 2018, About 4 years ago

Reply to the comment left by Asif Ahmed at 01/01/2018 - 18:04
Imagine the fuss if the Government extended this new principle and barred anyone from being a *tenant* if they have been "convicted for the criminal offences of blackmail, theft, handling stolen goods, harassment and stalking". Landlord licensing is apparently OK, but tenants never have to prove they are "fit and proper" persons to take on the responsibility of occupying a property, paying their rent and bills, and behaving well to their co-tenants and neighbours.

by David Price

18:29 PM, 8th January 2018, About 4 years ago

Reply to the comment left by Tony Atkins at 08/01/2018 - 16:08
Please do not suggest that, I would have no tenants left.

by Mike

18:37 PM, 10th January 2018, About 4 years ago

Alok Sharma said: “Every tenant has a right to a safe, secure and decent home, but far too many are being exploited by unscrupulous landlords who profit from providing overcrowded, squalid and sometimes dangerous homes.
And they have a choice to leave if they don't like being exploited, no one has put chains on them, you get what you pay for Mr Sharma, if tenants cannot afford decent rents, they don't deserve decent properties, why not put your own house in order first and provide those homeless people in 5 star hotels? why put them in shoddy substandard B&B? often a whole family being housed in just one room!

by Heather G.

11:40 AM, 17th January 2018, About 4 years ago

Reply to the comment left by Ross Tulloch at 29/12/2017 - 12:52
I've done a quick count on my comparables spreadsheet.
Of 327 3-bedroom properties in my area, 96 (29.4%) have a third bedroom of less than 4.64m2 and would therefore be totally unlettable. 63 (19.3%) have 3rd bedrooms between 4.64m2 and 6.51m2 so can only be let to children under 10. Therefore, 48.7% of all 3rd bedrooms in my area could not be let to an adult. They are obviously all marketed and priced as 3 beds. If the government thinks that it's so unreasonable for a child to sleep in a room under 4.64m2, why don't they ban owner occupiers from putting their children in these rooms? If LLs have to evict tenants from rooms (or houses) due to this legislation, will they provide any assistance for us to regain the properties quickly, or will tenants be told to hang on for the bailiffs?

by Grumpy Doug

15:59 PM, 17th January 2018, About 4 years ago

Reply to the comment left by Heather G. at 17/01/2018 - 11:40
Hi Heather. Where did you glean those details from? It would be useful for me to do a comparable exercise in my area, especially with all the student houses. As I stand at the moment, I'll be locking up to 6 bedrooms, or butchering some classic old houses just to enlarge perfectly good bedrooms that are marginally smaller, yet extremely popular as they are cheaper than the double rooms

by David Price

16:19 PM, 17th January 2018, About 4 years ago

Isn't it strange how councils grant planning permission for bedrooms which are then declared too small for the purpose for which they were intended?

This government certainly does not need lessons in how to reduce available accommodation in the middle of a housing crisis, or for that matter how to reduce availability of contractors capable of building new accommodation (Carillion).

by Heather G.

16:28 PM, 17th January 2018, About 4 years ago

Reply to the comment left by Grumpy Doug at 17/01/2018 - 15:59
Hi Grumpy Doug,
I run a spreadsheet of all the relevant properties in the area I'm investing in, tracking the price (and whether it's been reduced), number & type of rooms, size of 3rd bedroom, size of footprint, cost per m2, general condition, whether I've viewed it, flat yield, EA & URL. I keep a shortlist of ones I haven't dismissed. This gives me a general guide for 3 beds in the area, plus 3 beds in my target group. If you could give me your email address, I'd be happy to send you a sample sheet for you to populate.

by Heather G.

16:30 PM, 17th January 2018, About 4 years ago

Reply to the comment left by David Price at 17/01/2018 - 16:19
How about we ask Councils to reduce our Council Tax as the properties will no longer be worth the same amount ie a 3 bedroom would have a 2 bed value?

by David Price

17:44 PM, 17th January 2018, About 4 years ago

Reply to the comment left by Heather G. at 17/01/2018 - 16:30
Heather I like your sense of humour.


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