How to Rent guide updated by MHCLG

by Property118.com News Team

12:04 PM, 10th December 2020
About 3 months ago

How to Rent guide updated by MHCLG

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How to Rent guide updated by MHCLG

The Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government has today (10/12/2020) updated the How to Rent guide: Click here to download.

The statutory requirement is for a tenant to be provided with the version of the guide current at the time of the new tenancy and failure to serve the most up to date guide invalidates any future Section 21 action. A statutory periodic tenancy is also considered a new tenancy so an updated copy must be served after the fixed term before you can issue a Section 21.

The previous update of the How to Rent guide was sneaked out on the 7th August 2019.

The guide can be served as a hard copy or with the consent of the tenant emailed as a PDF.

“This guide is for tenants and landlords in the private rented sector to help them understand their rights and responsibilities. It provides a checklist and more detailed information on each stage of the process, including:

  • what to look out for before renting
  • living in a rented home
  • what happens at the end of a tenancy
  • what to do if things go wrong”

Comments

Chris @ Possession Friend

21:20 PM, 10th December 2020
About 3 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Rbinscotland at 10/12/2020 - 12:59
The 'How to Rent' is for ENGLAND only.

Chris @ Possession Friend

21:30 PM, 10th December 2020
About 3 months ago

" If you need a Guarantor, ask Shelter " ! ( Page 4 )

Gave me a chuckle 😉
Shelter will quickly pass the Tenant onto the Local Authority who will also quickly swerve the issue.
The government are grossly over-estimating the 'value' they think they're getting for their £20 Million + Annual subsidy.
Nobody want to take the risk that Landlords run, but all the critics want to pontificate.

Old Mrs Landlord

22:59 PM, 10th December 2020
About 3 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Chris @ Possession Friend at 10/12/2020 - 21:30
Good to see there's at least one civil servant with a sense of humour, though sadly any would-be renter following this advice will no doubt think it's a very warped one.

Old Mrs Landlord

23:07 PM, 10th December 2020
About 3 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Beaver at 10/12/2020 - 15:53
Agree it's confusing for a tenant the way the 'musts' and 'shoulds' are used interchangeably in places. Like so many other landlord requirements nowadays, it is not sufficient to comply, we must be able to produce documentary evidence that we have complied.

Beaver

6:20 AM, 11th December 2020
About 3 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Old Mrs Landlord at 10/12/2020 - 23:07
Quite...and comply with what? How can you know if some things say 'should' and some say 'must' and when electricians can have long debates over the new electrical regulations.

When it comes to the new electrical regulations you've then got to ask yourself why they came in at all. I totally get why we have to have a gas safety certificate; people do die from carbon monoxide poisoning. But when it comes to the safety of electrical appliances I've had a look for the safety data and whilst electrical accidents do regularly cause injury in the workplace, I cannot see any evidence of much of a problem in the domestic setting.

https://www.hse.gov.uk/

Does anyone know of any evidence anywhere that there was actually a problem that needed fixing with the new electrical regulations?

David Price

12:33 PM, 11th December 2020
About 3 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Beaver at 11/12/2020 - 06:20
Since when did the govenment need 'evidence' to justify anything? Remember Michael Gove "I think the people of this country have had enough of experts".

Beaver

12:59 PM, 11th December 2020
About 3 months ago

Reply to the comment left by David Price at 11/12/2020 - 12:33
Before introducing any new regulation the legislators have an obligation to do something called a "regulatory impact assessment".

So does anyone have any evidence that the recent electrical regulations were fixing a problem that needed fixing? I can't see any evidence of any accidents involving electrical goods in the home that aren't cause by appliances e.g. by tumble driers. I can't see any evidence out there that justified everybody having to fit a new consumer unit.

Seething Landlord

13:45 PM, 11th December 2020
About 3 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Beaver at 11/12/2020 - 12:59
The regulations are exempt from the impact assessment requirement - see S12 of the Explanatory Memorandum and the final paragraph of the Explanatory Note attached to the Regulations.

Seething Landlord

13:56 PM, 11th December 2020
About 3 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Chris @ Possession Friend at 10/12/2020 - 21:30The new guide says "ask Shelter for advice", previously "for help" so maybe MHCLG have seen the irony of the old wording.

Beaver

14:40 PM, 11th December 2020
About 3 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Seething Landlord at 11/12/2020 - 13:45
Really? So did the explanatory note say what problem these regulations were supposed to fix?

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