Eviction for dog sitting when agents already knew?

by Readers Question

13:42 PM, 26th February 2019
About A year ago

Eviction for dog sitting when agents already knew?

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Eviction for dog sitting when agents already knew?

My letting agency are looking to evict me, because I had my friends dog in the property when the owner turned up unannounced on a Sunday evening at 9.30pm, the dog was collected not long after this.

I understand it says in my contract that I am not allowed to keep pets in the property. However, I don’t own a pet, but I occasionally look after my friends dog during the day.

I have informed the letting agency, and discussed this many times with them and they have said it wasn’t a problem as long as the dog didn’t live there.

They are now want to evict me giving me 7 days, they are also saying I owe rent until the room is occupied. However they have done nothing to start this, there is no advert and there as been no viewings in the week they have given me to vacate.

Are they allowed to do this even though they were aware of the situation and never gave any formal warnings this would lead to an eviction where I am liable?

Also my tenancy agreement runs out on the 7th March, would they be able to charge me anything after this date anyway?

Thank you
Becki



Comments

Seething Landlord

11:42 AM, 27th February 2019
About A year ago

Reply to the comment left by Ian Narbeth at 27/02/2019 - 11:22Perhaps the illegality that James had in mind is that the landlord is attempting to get the tenant to leave on 7 days notice rather than the 2 months minimum if he serves a S21 (assuming it's a normal AST).

Ian Narbeth

11:59 AM, 27th February 2019
About A year ago

And what will her defence be to a s21 notice?

It is all very well trying to score legal points but the OP needs to act prudentially if wants to stay. She may have to stop the dog-sitting but if she starts accusing the landlord of acting illegally etc. she will receive a s21 notice, possibly also a s8 notice and a demand for the house to be professionally cleaned and de-flea'd. Her better option is to talk with the landlord and explain that she had discussed the matter "many times" with the agency and she thought she had been given permission. A reasonable landlord will allow her to stay but may ban the dog-sitting and/or impose conditions such as extra inspections and cleaning.

Old Mrs Landlord

12:14 PM, 27th February 2019
About A year ago

"(provided it is a normal AST)" may be key words in this discussion. The landlord is asking for rent until the room is relet, which suggests that this is an HMO (or possibly even a lodging). If this is the case the landlord would have free access to the common parts and would not be required to give notice. If there was a dog or evidence of the presence of a dog in the common parts in contravention of the tenancy agreement the landlord's annoyance is understandable. It seems to me that the nature of the tenancy needs to be clarified as it is not clear from the original post.

wanda wang

21:08 PM, 27th February 2019
About A year ago

Reply to the comment left by Ian Narbeth at 27/02/2019 - 11:59
I am wondering how can you charge for cleaning after 1st of June?
wanda

Michael Barnes

0:37 AM, 28th February 2019
About A year ago

Reply to the comment left by wanda wang at 27/02/2019 - 21:08
see Schedule 1 paragraph 6 of the Act, and include in agreement that T shall return property in same state of cleanliness as at start of tenancy.

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