Changing a Prepaid Meter?

by Readers Question

8:51 AM, 27th January 2017
About 2 years ago

Changing a Prepaid Meter?

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Changing a Prepaid Meter?

My sister in law is moving into a flat – everything has been agreed, bar one thing. The current meter is a pre paid one, apparently the previous tenant wanted it. gas meter

My sister in law would prefer to pay by DD which the landlord has agreed. However,the landlord has said that my sister in law has to change the meter, as it has to be in her name not the landlord’s, is this correct?

Do the electricity board charge for this?

Michael



Comments

John Boyle

9:53 AM, 27th January 2017
About 2 years ago

Yes, the utility companies will want to talk to the current tenant but are also quite happy to deal with the landlord if the property is empty.

I think the charge to swop from pre-paid to a credit meter (used to be called a Dry Meter) is about £50-60 per meter, I believe the gas meter costs a bit more than electric.

As a landlord, I normally pay the cost as a gesture of goodwill. However I believe the cost is often split 50/50. It's a matter for negotiation. A fair number of tenants like pre-paid.

It may be that the landlord doesn't want to get involved and end up having to pay out .

How badly do you want the flat?

Robert Mellors

9:56 AM, 27th January 2017
About 2 years ago

Hi Michael

The electricity supply will be in your sisters name, so yes it will be a case that your sister will need to arrange the meter change in her name. It is the supplier (at the tenant's request) who arranges the change of meter from a pre-paid meter to a normal credit meter, so your sister will need to contact her electricity supplier and request the meter change.

Some energy suppliers will change the meter free of charge, some will charge a fee for doing this, so it may be worthwhile checking this with the supplier.

If the supplier does charge for changing the meter, then it may be better to change the supplier to one that does not charge for changing meters (I used EDF for this purpose), then a month or two later ask the new supplier to change the meter to a credit meter. Once a credit meter is in, then you are free to change to whatever supplier your wish.

If a Smart meter is offered then this may be a good idea as then the supplier will only charge for actual usage rather than estimating the usage.

If your sister has a poor credit history, then the supplier may refuse to change the meter, and/or require a deposit from her before agreeing to instal a credit meter.

Paul Green

11:10 AM, 27th January 2017
About 2 years ago

Beware of smart meters. Their is a campaign currently being run by and organisation called 38 degrees... Smart meters use granular charging which will make the energy companies billions of pounds by charging you for every single unit of electricity you use , right down to chargeing your mobile phone . Smart meters are a ruse to get more money off the consumer..buyer beware. Lastly if you supplier says you have to have a smart meter fitted their wrong. there is no government policy saying you have to have one installed, stick with a dumb metet. They are cheaper.

Richard U

11:37 AM, 27th January 2017
About 2 years ago

I would add that the benefits to the tenant of not having pre-pay are worth the payment. The rates being charged are punitive and the tenant will inevitably save money over the tenancy by being smart about choosing the best DD deal.

Robert Mellors

11:44 AM, 27th January 2017
About 2 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Paul Green" at "27/01/2017 - 11:10":

Hi Paul

As far as I can see there is no issue with paying for every unit of electricity you use, surely that is what you are supposed to do? That said, I've no idea what "granular charging" is, or how that differs from normal charging, can you explain further please?

Luk Udav

14:47 PM, 27th January 2017
About 2 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Robert Mellors" at "27/01/2017 - 11:44":

The only thing I can find about "granular charging" and smart meters is at a website where pre-purchase of Bacofoil is recommeneded. Richard U is 100% correct, pre-pays are a rip-off.

Paul Green

15:35 PM, 27th January 2017
About 2 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Robert Mellors" at "27/01/2017 - 11:44":

Hi Robert our old meters known as dumb meters use 1/10 (one tenth) to measure 1 unit of electricity used. That's the last didit on our meters usually in red. Plugging in a mobile phone charger would hardly register on a dumb meter, because of the low voltage draw it requires to charge a phone. On a smart meter the decimal point is moved to record 1/1000 or even more 1/100000 and so can pick up the slightest crumb of current draw used in our homes, their by costing the consumer hundreds of pounds more in metering charges and if you multiply that for the whole country company's the big 5 (a monopoly) stand to make billions of profits from granular charging, basically charging you for every grain of electricity used. That's why their so smart. The big five use propaganda to say this will benefit the end user, but it's the reverse , that's why they install them for free. And some companies even knock on your door to change your meter and say the government wants all houses to have one fitted by 2020. It's not true. There is no obligation to except one. Here is a list of other reasons not to have one fitted. and the 38 degree campaign..please sign the petition too... .it's not only damming but shocking . It goes like this..

To: Theresa May
WE DO NOT CONSENT TO THE ROLL OUT OF SMART METERS IN THE UK
SIGN THE PETITION
JTContact Campaign Creator
Campaign created by
JV Tolentino
WE DO NOT CONSENT TO THE ROLL OUT OF SMART METERS IN THE UK
Dear Theresa May, We, the undesigned request that you STOP THE ROLL-OUT OF SMART METERS IN THE UK with immediate effect.

Why is this important?

We are told that 'Smart' Meters will replace our existing water, gas and electricity metering systems and that the UK as a whole could benefit from saving up to 2% of our energy IF we change our behaviour.

What are we NOT being told..

1. There are major health concerns

'Smart' Meters emit a continuous stream of pulsed microwave radiation, 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. These fields are intensely bio-active and affect the people and natural ecology in and around each home as well nearby. Mechanism for harm to Human Health include activation of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and cellular communication interference which leads to the production of free-radicals and DNA damage (Prof. Martin Pall, 2014)

EMF waves are especially dangerous to the cells, DNA and organs of young children, babies and foetuses.

2. There are cheaper, less intrusive, ways of monitoring energy

Germany has rejected 'Smart' Meters, citing a "lack of savings" for customers. In the UK, 'Smart' Meters are being publicised promoted as "putting consumers in control of energy".

If that were true, UK consumers would be given an inexpensive energy monitor - available for just £15 - to assess their own energy/appliance use. Instead, 'Smart' Meters are designed to transmit private data to energy companies and allow them to remotely disconnect supplies and perform "Active Demand Management" - where appliances can be controlled by the energy company (Ofgem 2014). These facts are not being explained to the public.

3. They do NOT reduce energy/utility consumption

Only consumers can save energy - when they chose to change their behaviour. If saving measures are not taken, Smart Meters will actually lead to higher bills to pay for the total programme cost of £12bn - representing a cost to each home and small business of at least £400. Energy bills shot up in December 2013 - as energy companies looked to maximise profits.

4. Security vulnerabilities

The proposed 'Smart' Meter infrastructure is inherently insecure and will leave UK homes, in the words of GCHQ, "open to terrorist [cyber] attack". A plan to place our entire domestic and small business energy and water supply online is at best reckless and at worst openly inviting trouble - whether that threat lies abroad or closer to home. 'Smart' Meters also increase the impacts of grid security threats from electromagnetic pulse attacks (Jamieson 2012)

5. Privacy intrusions and profiling

Smart Meters harvest vast amounts of private data about occupant's lives and behaviours at home - allowing corporations and agencies to analyse our habits, profile our behaviours and monetise our private lives. We are aware that access to our medical data and tax data is already being passed on to third parties - we have no doubt that the valuable data gathered by 'Smart' Meters will follow.

6. They are a poor investment of OUR money

Smart Meters will COST THE PUBLIC AT LEAST £12 BILLION with no guarantee of any savings being returned by Big Energy. And because of the significant project risks and problems, the bills is likely to be far, far higher.

7. They are neither 'green' nor “clean” – and could become the basis for unaffordable remediation costs

Many countries (e.g. Belgium, France, Austria, Russia) have taken great steps to limit or remove sources of RF/MW pollution - especially for children - due to the now 5,000+ studies now showing harm from artificial sources of EMFs. The UK, however, seems oblivious to now established mechanisms for harm and is therefore not taking a precautionary approach in its continued implementation of a wireless "Smart" Grid. While UK standards were overwhelmingly voted "out of date and obsolete" in an EU parliamentary motion in 2008, they remain in place despite PHE's inability to categorically confirm that non-thermal EMF exposure is "safe". Simultaneously, the WHO now categorises RF EMFs as a 2B possible cancer causing agent.

8. They are likely to disappoint and further disenfranchise hard-working consumers

A one year study by Toronto Hydro showed that 84% of people's bills went UP after 'Smart; Meters had been installed - often by more 50%+. There is no guarantee of any savings from 'Smart' Meters. Instead, Ofgem's recent 'Smartgrid Routemap' promotes the introduction of lucrative "Time of Use" tariffs which will require people to take significant steps to avoid being penalised for using appliances at busy times.

Many pilot studies show that Smart Meters do NOT lead to sustained energy savings - ComEd's pilot in the US showing "zero statistical difference" in usage.

Who will benefit when users make no energy savings, but Big Energy and the Government has the means to exploit private data and take control of our appliances? Whoever it may be, it will not be the UK public.

We therefore want this £12bn programme STOPPED.

Darlington Landlord

18:21 PM, 27th January 2017
About 2 years ago

Only the account holder can ask for the meter to be changed and it can take up to 6 weeks for an account to be setup and the account number sent. I would suggest that she takes the flat with a written agreement that the landlord will make a reasonable (perhaps a specific or capped amount) contribution towards the cost of having a key meter for a couple of months and any charge to replace it. As mentioned above some suppliers will change the meter for free if you are moving to them. I have had several electric meters changed free by Southern Electricity. You will need the MPAN number (on bills but you may find the landlord has an old bill with it on) to change supplier.

Paul Green

19:04 PM, 27th January 2017
About 2 years ago

My meters were changed to prepayment via a court order, by the electric and gas company (duel fuel) because my tenant run up a £1500 debit and left without paying. I told my next tenant that if they wanted to switch supper they could to save some money. 22 months later on check out I took meter readings and discovered they had not only changed suppliers but also had the meters changed back; and reverted to direct debit. They never asked me for a penny. And done me a favour because I prefer Direct debit meters, it's easy to take readings and keep the electric and gas on in the flat via final bill during void periods...this was because I had gave them permission to switch (although not pacifically the actual meters) I suspect the new suppliers installed them for nothing, hence not hearing from them. They also had good credit history as they were doctors....I think the tenants should pay, otherwise your be swopping back and forth depending on whether people prefer prepayment or quarterly bills...we can't be dictated to , what's there is there, it's your account (the tenants) you change and pay for it. Depending on what you prefer

Paul Green

19:09 PM, 27th January 2017
About 2 years ago

My meters were change to prepayment via a court order, by the electric and gas company (duel fuel) because my tenant run up a £1500 debit and left without paying. I told my next that if they wanted to switch supper they could to save some money. 22 months later on check out I took meter readings and discovered they had not only changed suppliers but also had the meters changed back & reverted to direct debit. They never asked me for a penny. And done me a favour because I prefer Direct debit meters, it's easy to take readings and keep the electric and gas on in void periods...this was because I had gave them permission to switch (although not pacifically the actual meters) I suspect the new suppliers installed them for nothing, hence not hearing from them. They also had good credit history as they were doctors....I think the tenants should pay, otherwise your be swopping back and forth depending on whether people prefer prepayment or quarterly bills...

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