Theresa May – “I will take charge to solve the housing crisis”

Theresa May – “I will take charge to solve the housing crisis”

14:54 PM, 4th October 2017, About 4 years ago 14

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Theresa May’s grueling speech to the Tory party conference pledged to fix the broken housing market and to fulfil the “British Dream” for you people to own a home, but it was light on new policy details and money.

On the PRS May said that she wanted to give redress to tenants where landlords did not adequately maintain their homes. Another nod to the compulsory Redress scheme  for private landlords muted on Sunday.

On the housing market, May restated that it was the Tories who introduced Help to Buy but “the election result shows that is not nearly enough” to redress the generation inequality that the average house price is now 8 times average earnings.

She also confirmed that there will be an additional £2bn for affordable housing, increasing the budget to over £9bn. However, there was no mention of the number of additional homes this would create, but new homes for social rent at below market rates need to be built where the need is the greatest.

Mrs May told, or warned, developers that the government will make land available, but it they must take the responsibility to build homes people need.

Unlike recent Prime Ministers though she told the conference that it was her mission to solve the housing crisis and she would take personal charge.

Will this be sufficient compared to Jeremy Corbyn’s promise to build a million new homes if Labour were to get into power?



Comments

by Chris @ Possession Friend

22:27 PM, 7th October 2017, About 4 years ago

All these 'Extra measures' the Tories are trying to appease the voters they lost at the last election ( at the expense of Landlords ) isn't good news for us.
Those landlords ( and associations ) who are pleased by the news of a Housing court must live in some mistaken belief that there'll be more of an element of fairness to landlords by a specialist Housing court than the current system ! - do you really think so ?
All the emphasis by everyone in government and other tenant associations is about "whats required for tenants"
Nobody is mentioning what's required for landlords and I don't anticipate that changing anytime soon.
As for Deed of Assurances !, let me see, a landlord promises to pay the tenant if they require possession other than for some fault of the tenant ( which is not in landlords interest to incurr voids and go through finding new tenants, without good cause ) WHAT is the other side of the coin for tenants ?
I don't see any clause that if they breach their tenancy agreement, the tenants will pay the same amount to landlords ! I'm sorry, but my view of such Deeds and ideas are that their a one-sided unnecessary concession to tenants, the suggestion of which you'd more expect from an organisation such as Shelter or Generation rent etc, rather than a landlord.

by Gary Dully

23:46 PM, 7th October 2017, About 4 years ago

As mentioned previously, incentives to build are a good idea on paper,

But who, in their right mind, wants to deal with councils, utility companies, planners, surveyors, builders, plasterers, electricians, plumbers and estate agents?

Oh I remember now, that’s 1.5 million BTL Landlords who are eager to build, buy, renovate and rent to supply housing stock.

But the f*ckwits cant see they have an army of housing providers.

Instead they have declared war on us.

by Monty Bodkin

8:03 AM, 8th October 2017, About 4 years ago

Reply to the comment left by Chris Daniel at 07/10/2017 - 22:27
Those landlords ( and associations ) who are pleased by the news of a Housing court must live in some mistaken belief that there'll be more of an element of fairness to landlords by a specialist Housing court than the current system ! - do you really think so ?

I share your scepticism but a (probably unintended) consequence of this is specialist judges and a quicker system than currently.

And maybe if a judge is regularly dealing with housing, they may become confident enough at spotting the obvious scumbags abusing the system and use their judgement to start granting evictions on the discretionary grounds.
(Ever the optimist!)

by Chris @ Possession Friend

21:18 PM, 8th October 2017, About 4 years ago

Reply to the comment left by Monty Bodkin at 08/10/2017 - 08:03Monty,
The reason I would say you are being Optimistic, is all the comments about a Housing court, have related to the benefits for tenants, i.e. being able to bring claims for disrepair and routing out Rogue landlords etc.
Nobody and nowhere have I read from the Tories or any other politicians ( fuelled by tenants groups ) is there any benefit for landlords or even acknowledgement of the problems Landlords might want addressed by ANY court, i.e serious rent and damage by tenants. The powers that be don't even recognise this as a regular business challenge for housing those families that the government and social providers have failed to accommodate, ... and what is our thanks - more tax [ Sec 24 ] and regulations.


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