Tag Archives: Nationwide Building Society

Remember our background is in BuytoLet and Commercial finance Buy to Let News, Commercial Finance, Latest Articles

PartnersRemember our background is in BuytoLet and Commercial finance Mark, Mike and I met through the common background of BuytoLet and Commercial Finance. Over the years through The Money Centre and now Property118 we have literally helped 10s of thousands of Landlords, developers and investors start and grow their property businesses.

Unfortunately we are now old enough to have seen, done and bought the t-shirt for most things in the property finance industry including Mark and Mike being founder members of the NACFB (National Association of Commercial Finance Brokers) and working with Nationwide Building Society and Paragon Mortgages on the concept of Forward Buying Facilities.

We have been sharing our experiences and strategies for property finance as much as we can with readers, but there is always a time when you just need some help.

To start with we have our own BuytoLet mortgage sourcing system and calculator, which we designed ourselves and I keep updated. This will help you see how much you could borrow, what the costs would be and which are the most popular Lenders and Products.

We have a team of highly experienced NACFB member commercial finance Brokers who can advise you on and source the best Commercial, Development finance and BuytoLet deals.

If you need help with…

Buy to Let mortgages  : info@property118.com

Commercial Mortgages CLICK HERE

Development Finance CLICK HERE

Bridging Finance CLICK HERE

…. or guidance regarding property finance you can email us on : info@property118.com Call Property118 on: 01603 489118

Or contact me directly on npatterson@property118.com.


Private Rented Sector Review – Conclusions and recommendations Landlord News, Latest Articles

The Private Rented Sector Review conclusions and recommendations published by the Communities and Local Government Committee:

Simplifying regulation

1.  We recommend that the Government conduct a wide-ranging review to consolidate legislation covering the private rented sector, with the aim of producing a much simpler and more straightforward set of regulations that landlords and tenants can easily understand. As part of this review, the Government should work with groups representing tenants, landlords and agents to bring forward a standard, plain language tenancy agreement on which all agreements should be based. There should be a requirement to include landlords’ contact details in tenancy agreements. (Paragraph 13)

2.  We recommend that the Government consult on the future of the housing health and safety rating system and the introduction of a simpler, more straightforward set of quality standards for housing in the sector. The Government should also ensure that planning and building regulations are consistent with standards for the quality and safety of private rented housing. (Paragraph 18)

Increasing awareness

3.  We recommend that, once the review of the legislative framework we have called for is completed, the Government, working with tenants’, landlords’ and agents’ groups, establish and help to fund a publicity campaign to promote awareness of tenants’ and landlords’ respective rights and responsibilities. Our recommendation for a wholesale review of the regulation in the sector provides the obvious platform on which to base a publicity campaign. (Paragraph 24)

4.  We recommend that the Government bring forward proposals for the introduction of easy-to-read key fact sheets for landlords and tenants, and consult on the information these sheets should contain. The sheets could include links to further information available online. As a minimum, the sheets should set out each party’s key rights and obligations, and give details of local organisations to whom they could go for further advice and information. This fact sheet should be included within the standard tenancy agreement we propose earlier in this chapter. (Paragraph 25)

Raising standards

5.  Some local authorities are doing excellent work to raise standards in the private rented sector, but there appears to be more scope for sharing this good practice, so that all councils are performing to a high standard. The Local Government Association should, as part of its sector-led improvement role, make sure that mechanisms are in place to ensure all councils learn from the good practice and take effective steps to improve standards of property and management in the private rented sector. (Paragraph 30)

6.  We are concerned about reports of reductions in staff who have responsibility for enforcement and tenancy relations and who have an important role in making approaches to raising standards successful. Given the financial constraints that councils face, it is important to identify approaches to raising standards that will not use up scarce resources. One approach is to ensure that enforcement arrangements pay for themselves and help to fund wider improvement activity. Therefore, where possible, the burden of payment should be placed upon those landlords who flout their responsibilities. (Paragraph 31)

7.  We recommend that the Government consult on proposals to empower councils to impose a penalty charge without recourse to court action where minor housing condition breaches are not remedied within a fixed period of time, though an aggrieved landlord would have the right of appeal to a court. (Paragraph 33)

8.  We recommend that, where landlords are convicted of letting property below legal standards, local authorities be given the power to recoup from a landlord an amount equivalent to that paid out to the tenant in housing benefit (or, in future, universal credit). We hope that such a measure will help to prevent unscrupulous landlords from profiting from public money. Local authorities should be able to retain the money recouped to fund their work to raise standards. To ensure a consistent approach, those tenants who have paid rent with their own resources should also have the right to reclaim this rent when their landlord has been convicted of letting a substandard property. (Paragraph 37)

Illegal eviction

9.  We do not agree that a statutory duty to have to take steps to tackle illegal eviction should be placed on local authorities, as it would be inconsistent with a localist approach. Nevertheless, it is again important that local authorities learn from each other and share best practice on tackling illegal eviction. The Local Government Association should ensure that lessons on illegal eviction are learnt and disseminated. (Paragraph 38)

10.  We are concerned that the police are sometimes unaware of their responsibilities in dealing with reports of illegal eviction. We recommend that the Department for Communities and Local Government work with the Home Office on guidance that sets out clearly the role of the police in enforcement of the Prevention from Eviction Act 1977. (Paragraph 39)

Licensing and accreditation

11.  The idea of national licensing has some merit, and such a scheme could bring a number of benefits, particularly if introduced alongside an effective system of redress. It is clear, however, that the Government has not been convinced by these arguments, and we have some sympathy with the Minister’s assertion that a national scheme could be very rigid. Having tailored local schemes may bring its own costs, especially for landlords operating across several areas, but on balance we would prefer to see local authorities develop their own approaches to licensing or accreditation in accordance with local needs. The Government’s focus should be on giving local authorities greater flexibility and encouraging the use of existing powers. (Paragraph 43)

12.  We recommend that the Government bring forward proposals for a reformed approach to selective licensing, which gives councils greater freedom over when licensing schemes can be introduced and more flexibility over how they are implemented. Councils should ensure that the cost of a licence is not set so high as to discourage investment in the sector. (Paragraph 49)

13.  We recommend that the Government give local authorities a power to require landlords to be members of an accreditation scheme run either by the council itself or by a recognised landlords association. (Paragraph 53)

14.  It is important that local authorities have options and tools to raise standards in their areas. Three particular options are: (1) greater use of landlord licensing schemes; (2) compulsory accreditation; and (3) taking a proactive neighbourhood approach to raising standards. In each of these cases, given resource constraints, the schemes have to pay for themselves, and, as far as possible, place the burden of payment on the unscrupulous landlords, with financial deterrents for non-compliance. Councils should be given the powers to impose heavy penalties on those who do not register for licensing or compulsory accreditation after appropriate notification. Neighbourhood approaches could be funded by local authorities recouping costs from landlords whose properties fail to meet minimum standards. We further recommend that the Government initiate a review of the fines imposed by the courts for letting substandard properties, to ensure they act as a sufficient deterrent. (Paragraph 55)

Houses in multiple occupation (HMOs)

15.  We recommend that the Government conduct a review of the mandatory licensing of houses in multiple occupation. This review should consider, amongst other things, evidence of the effectiveness of mandatory licensing, how well it is enforced, and whether the definition of a prescribed HMO should be modified. (Paragraph 58)

16.  Where there are community concerns about high concentrations of houses in multiple occupation, councils should have the ability to control the spread of HMOs. Such issues should be a matter for local determination. We therefore consider it appropriate that councils continue to have the option to use Article 4 directions to remove permitted development rights allowing change of use to HMO. (Paragraph 63)

17.  Universities have a responsibility to ensure that student housing does not have a detrimental impact upon local communities. They should be working with local authorities and student groups to ensure that there is sufficient housing in appropriate areas and that students act as responsible householders and members of the community. (Paragraph 64)

Safety standards

18.  We recommend that the Government work with the electrical industry to develop an electrical safety certificate for private rented properties. To obtain such a certificate, properties should be required to have a full wiring check every five years and a visual wiring check on change of tenancy. Landlords should be aware of the legal requirement to provide safe installations and appliances. (Paragraph 66)

19.  We recommend that the Government introduce a requirement for all private rented properties to be fitted with a working smoke alarm and, wherever a relevant heating appliance is installed, an audible, wired-up EN 50291 compliant carbon monoxide alarm. (Paragraph 67)

Regulation of letting agents

20.  We recommend that, as part of its consultation on the redress scheme, the Government seek views on how best to publicise such a scheme and what penalties should be in place for those agents who do not comply. The Government should also explore how the redress scheme fits alongside existing arrangements for deposit protection. We further recommend that the redress scheme is accompanied by a robust code of practice that sets out clear standards with which agents are required to comply. (Paragraph 74)

21.  We recommend that the Government make letting and managing agents subject to the same regulation that currently governs sales agents. This includes giving the Office of Fair Trading the power to ban agents who act improperly, and making client money protection and professional indemnity insurance mandatory. (Paragraph 78)

22.  Any proposal to require sales agents to meet minimum professional standards before they begin trading should also be applied to letting and managing agents. In addition, if at any point a requirement for sales agents to be registered with an accredited industry body is to be introduced, this should be part of a wider framework also covering letting and managing agents. We recommend that the Government review these arrangements in two years’ time. (Paragraph 78)

Agents’ fees and charges

23.  We recommend that the code of practice accompanying the new redress scheme include a requirement that agents publish a full breakdown of fees which are to be charged to the tenant alongside any property listing or advertisement, be it on a website, in a window or in print. This breakdown should not be “small print”, but displayed in such a way as to be immediately obvious to the potential tenant. The code should also require agents to explain their fees and charges to tenants before showing them around any property. Furthermore, the code should forbid double charging, and there should be a requirement that landlords are informed of any fees being charged to tenants. If agents do not meet these requirements, the fees should be illegal. Finally, the professional bodies should make a commitment to full, up front transparency on fees and charges a requirement of membership. (Paragraph 83)

24.  We intend to gather further information on the impact in Scotland of the decision to make fees to tenants illegal, and to return to this issue in 2014. (Paragraph 86)

Longer tenancies

25.  The demographics within the private rented sector are changing. No longer can it be seen as a tenure mainly for those looking for short-term, flexible forms of housing. While some renters still require flexibility, there is also an increasing number, including families with children, looking for longer-term security. The market, therefore, needs to be flexible, and to offer people the type of housing they need. The flexibility of assured shorthold tenancies should be better exploited, and the option of using assured tenancies should also be considered where these meet the needs of landlords and tenants. That we are beginning to see some institutions and housing associations offering longer tenancies under the current law suggests that we do not need legislative changes to achieve them. Rather, we need to change the culture, and to find ways to overcome the barriers to longer tenancies being offered. (Paragraph 94)

26.  We recommend that the Government convene a working party from all parts of the industry, to examine proposals to speed up the process of evicting during a tenancy tenants who do not pay rent promptly or fail to meet other contractual obligations. The ability to secure eviction more quickly for non payment of rent will encourage landlords to make properties available on longer tenancies. The Government should also set out a quicker means for landlords to gain possession if they can provide proof that they intend to sell the property. (Paragraph 97)

27.  Some landlords are not able to offer longer tenancies because they are prevented from doing so by conditions in their mortgage. We are pleased that lenders are considering how such conditions can be removed, and that Nationwide Building Society is to begin allowing its borrowers to offer longer term contracts. We urge the Council of Mortgage Lenders to work with other lenders to ensure that they quickly follow suit. Lenders should only include restrictions on tenancy length in mortgage conditions if there is a clear and transparent reason. (Paragraph 100)

28.  We recommend that the Government include in the code of conduct for letting agents a requirement both to make tenants aware of the full range of tenancy options available, and, where appropriate, to broker discussions about tenancy length between landlords and tenants. (Paragraph 102)

‘Retaliatory eviction’

29.  There is a perception amongst some tenants that if they speak out it could result in their losing their home. Tenants should be able to make requests or complain without fear that doing so will lead the landlord to seek possession. We are not convinced, however, that a legislative approach is the best or even an effective solution. Changing the law to limit the issuing of section 21 notices might be counter-productive and stunt the market. Rather, if we move towards a culture where longer tenancies become the norm, tenants will have greater security and also more confidence to ask for improvements and maintenance and, when necessary, to complain about their landlord. Moreover, if local authorities take a more proactive approach to enforcement, they will be able to address problems as they occur rather than waiting for tenants to report them. (Paragraph 105)

Rents and affordability

30.  Problems with the affordability of rents are particularly acute in London and the South East. Although in other parts of the country average rents and yields are relatively stable, we are still concerned that some families are struggling to meet the costs of their rent. We do not, however, support rent control which would serve only to reduce investment in the sector at a time when it is most needed. We agree that the most effective way to make rents more affordable would be to increase supply, particularly in those areas where demand is highest. (Paragraph 110)

31.  There is no perfect way to set rent, but, where longer tenancies are being established, linking increases to inflation or average earnings, or voluntarily agreeing a fixed uplift each year merit consideration and could provide tenants and landlords with a degree of stability, though over time mechanisms may emerge as, for example, in the commercial property sector. Tenants’, landlords’ and agents’ groups should encourage their members to discuss these options at the outset of a tenancy. Existing arrangements for setting and increasing rent are often arbitrary and uneven, and reflect the immaturity of the market. (Paragraph 113)

Placement of homeless households in the private rented sector

32.  We welcome the Government’s use of secondary legislation to clarify when accommodation is unsuitable for homeless households. We expect councils to pay full regard to this order and to ensure that homeless households are only placed in suitable accommodation. Given that many of these households will be vulnerable, councils have a particular responsibility to ensure that the properties they are placed in are free from serious health and safety hazards. We recommend that, as a matter of good practice, local authorities should inspect properties before using them for the placement of homeless households. (Paragraph 117)

33.  All agree that, wherever possible, councils should be placing homeless households within their local area (unless there are particular circumstances that mean it is not in the households’ interests). It nevertheless appears inevitable that councils in areas with high rents, London in particular, will place homeless households outside the area, including in coastal towns. Before any placement, there should be a full discussion with the receiving authority and the prospective tenant and information about the household and its ongoing needs should be shared. The Government should consider making this a statutory duty. (Paragraph 121)

34.  We were pleased to hear of positive examples of work to support homeless households in the private rented sector, including the establishment of social letting agencies and the development of private rented sector access schemes. We encourage the Government to work with local government, the charity sector and industry bodies to ensure best practice is shared and lessons learned. (Paragraph 122)

Local housing allowance

35.  We recommend that the Government take immediate steps to allow councils to apply for a variation of broad rental market area boundaries where anomalies occur. (Paragraph 125)

36.  We recommend that the Government conduct a wide-ranging review of local housing allowance (LHA). This review should assess whether there is greater scope for local flexibility over the setting of LHA rates and the boundaries of broad rental market areas. Local authorities could be incentivised to reduce the housing benefit bill by being allowed to retain any savings for investment in affordable housing. (Paragraph 125)

Data quality

37.  We recommend that the Government establish a small task group of key organisations and academics to consider how data relating to the private rented sector can be improved and made more readily available. In addition, we encourage the National Audit Office to contribute to an effective evidence base about the sector and to draw upon our recommendations when developing studies on housing related topics. (Paragraph 128)

Tax

38.  We recommend that the Government, in reviewing the regulation covering the private rented sector, set out proposals for greater co-ordination between the tax authorities and those regulating the private rented sector. (Paragraph 131)

Increasing supply

39.  We welcome the introduction and expansion of the Build to Rent Fund. The Government should take steps to ensure that the fund makes a net addition to new housing, as well as speeding up the delivery of those homes already in the pipeline. (Paragraph 138)

40.  It remains to be seen how much impact the guarantee scheme for the private rented sector will have in delivering additional new homes. The policy may be well-intentioned in its aim to encourage organisations to have more confidence to invest in the sector, but the Government needs to measure results. We invite the Government in its response to our report to update us on the number of applications it has received for the private rented sector guarantee scheme, and to provide an estimate for the number of additional homes it expects the scheme to deliver. If there is any doubt that the scheme is going to deliver the homes required, we recommend that the Government rapidly explore other options for the use of the resources identified. (Paragraph 142)

41.  We welcome the establishment of the task force to promote and broker investment in build-to-let development, and are pleased that the task force is already in operation. It is important that this task force does not become another quango but quickly delivers on its objectives. We invite the Government, in its response, to set out the progress made by the task force in its first few months of operation. This update should quantify the amount of additional investment brokered, and the number of additional homes it would deliver. (Paragraph 144)

42.  Efforts to promote high-quality build-to-let development have commanded significant amounts of government attention and resources. One of the main arguments in favour of this approach is that it will lead to improved choice, quality and affordability across the whole of the private rented sector. It is too early to assess the impact, but a key part of the evaluation of these measures must be the impact they have on the sector as a whole. If, in a year’s time, there is no evidence of this broader effect, the Government must reconsider its strategy and look to other measures to boost supply across the sector as a whole. (Paragraph 148)

43.  There is an urgent need to boost supply across all tenures of housing. We recommend that the Government revisit the Committee’s report on the Financing of New Housing Supply, and set out proposals to implement those recommendations it initially rejected. (Paragraph 150)commons logo


Consent to let dilemma Latest Articles

Consent to let dilemmaCan you help me with my “Consent To Let” dilemma please?

I own a small property portfolio, 4 buy to let property, one property I own as tenants in common with my grandfather (no mortgage on this property) and one residential property that I currently reside in (since Sept 12).

Due to changes in my personal circumstances I intend moving in with my girlfriend this summer and hence I have let my property out to 4 students on a 12 months AST with guarantors etc..

Before I let the property out/sent the consent to let form in with my £30 pounds admin fee, I “tested the water” and rang Nationwide Building Society up, informed of the circumstances and they stated that there shouldn’t be a problem. I even went in to a Branch of Nationwide and they said they refuse the applications very rarely.

I haven’t heard from Nationwide despite sending the application in on 25th May with the £30 cheque that has been cashed.

I have phoned them numerous times and they say the application hasn’t been scanned on yet (I am not sure where the actual form is). I am now panicking as the students are due to move in on 1st July.

I am concerned that if they refuse the “permission to let”, what should I do? I can’t rescind on my contract in terms of not renting the students my house as they have all signed up. On the other hand Nationwide could take me to court for breach of a condition i.e. letting it out without permission.

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Chris W


Major buy to let lender shuns benefits tenants Buy to Let News, Landlord News, Latest Articles, Mortgage News, Property Investment News, Property Market News, Property News

Major buy to let lender shuns benefits tenantsMortgage Brokers across the UK have been advised by Nationwide Building Society’s specialist buy to let mortgage arm (The Mortgage Works) that they are changing their criteria to stop buy to let investors letting their properties to tenants in receipt of benefits.

A survey from housing charity Crisis, released just before Christmas, claimed that 98.5% of landlords don’t accept benefits tenants already. We doubt very much that’s true as in some areas of the UK vast elements of the population are claiming benefits and renting from private landlords. Continue reading Major buy to let lender shuns benefits tenants


Lenders cut rates with new buy to let mortgage deals Buy to Let News, Financial Advice, Latest Articles, Mortgage News

Buy to let mortgage borrowing is expected to increase even more as lenders switch funds away from movers and first time buyers to landlords.

Several key lenders have already pledged more funds for buy to let – including the Co-op Bank and The Mortgage Works, the property investment subsidiary of the Nationwide Building Society. Continue reading Lenders cut rates with new buy to let mortgage deals


House prices down 1% and may drop further, warns lender House Prices, Latest Articles, Property Investment News, Property Market News

Homeowners face more misery as house prices dropped back for the first time in six months as the stamp duty holiday for first time buyers ends.

The fall signals the start of an expected slow decline in house prices as first time buyers race to complete a purchase rather than holding off until later in the year. Continue reading House prices down 1% and may drop further, warns lender


Buy to Let Lender Reveals Landlord Loan Home Truths Latest Articles, Mortgage News, Property Market News

Buy to let insiders have revealed some home truths behind the property business in an online video for mortgage brokers.

The key speaker was Paul Howard, head of the Nationwide’s specialist accounts, which includes major landlord lender The Mortgage Works (TMW)

The video debate was hosted by trade magazine Mortgage Solutions, bringing Howard together mortgage brokers and an independent adviser. He said he expects to see a continuing and growing demand for buy to let mortgages.

“I expect buy to let to grow to 20%, maybe 25% of all broker business,” he said. “The market is very significant and the trend has already started. More people need to rent and this demand is driving more demand for buy to let.”

He explained that landlord mortgages are likely to grow 40% this year – from £10 billion of lending in 2010 to £14 billion.

The reason is margins on lending – Howard highlighted that mortgage lenders can make bigger profits on lending the same amount of money to landlords rather than other homeowners.

“Buy to let margins are a lot more attractive than residential lending,” he said. “Lender’s criteria will soften, tighter margins will give landlords better pricing.”

He went on to explain why landlord lenders charge such high fees.

“Buy to let fees are misunderstood,” he said. “Higher fees give borrowers lower interest rates and improves cash flow for a landlord. High fees also make the rent cover calculation work better.”

Howard then discussed how the cost of a high fee/low rate mortgage is similar to a no fee/high rate loan – but 90% of TMW customers opt for the higher fee product because the lower mortgage rate gives them better cash flow.

“Low rate, low fee mortgages are not going to happen,” he said. “The lender won’t make a profit from these loans and buy to let mortgage rates are higher because lenders are not paying the Bank of England base rate for their money.”

The debate also covered mortgage regulation, which Howard spoke out against.

View the debate here


New Tracker Lender for Buy to Let Buy to Let News, Latest Articles, Property Investment News, Property Market News

Street with 'To Let' signs outside most houses
“State Bank of India set to enter the buy to let market”

A new buy to let mortgage lender is about to enter the market with broker-only deals.

The State Bank of India (SBI) has announced preparations to offer a 60% loan-to-value (LTV) tracker at 3.9%.

The first applications will be handled in branches and then opened to brokers and independent financial advisers.

The bank is accepting deals for loans between £50,000 and £1.5 million, and charges a £150 booking fee and £1,990 closing fee. No early redemption payments are charged.

SBI has 10 branches, mainly in and around London.

Leeds Building Society has launched a new five year 4.99% fixed rate buy to let mortgage at 70% LTV.

The closing fee is £1,299 and the lender allows borrowers make 10% capital repayments a year without penalty.

Borrowers are also being offered a free valuation and a legal service for remortgages in a bid to tempt them in.

Meanwhile, Kensington has pulled all 85% LTV buy to let mortgages; Skipton Building Society has raised the tracker rates from 3.24% to 3.59% and Aldermore Bank has stopped offering fixed rate deals.

Replacement deals are at more expensive interest rates or charge more fees.

Despite a flurry of activity among lenders, the market is still dominated by the big two – BM Solutions, owned by the Lloyds Banking Group, and The Mortgage Works (TMW), a Nationwide Building Society subsidiary

These landlord lenders have around a 90% share of the market.

The buy to let market has around 30 bank, building society and finance house lenders offering about 2,600 different loan deals at an average 23% loan-to-value.

Santander is the latest big name lender considering entering the property investment market. A spokesman has confirmed the bank is ‘considering’ buy to let loans to non-professional landlords.


Financial Woes Stop 3 Million from Moving Home House Prices, Latest Articles, Property Market News

House made from money

"House prices dropped £90 a day in August"

Three million homeowners are staying put rather than moving home over concerns about jobs, money and mortgages.

A lack of confidence in the economy is undermining the housing market, a new survey in advance of the RESI 2011 conference later this month has found.

RESI 2011 is a networking event for house builders, social housing managers and mortgage lenders.

About a million homeowners cannot move because they cannot borrow enough money due to uncertain job prospects, or even if they have a job with a good future, their earnings are not enough to buy the home they want. Continue reading Financial Woes Stop 3 Million from Moving Home


Landlords Feel Good About Buy to Let Prospects Buy to Let News, Latest Articles

1 green property amongst a row a red properties

"The NLA have found positive landords"

Landlords are feeling good about the prospects of their letting businesses, according to a new survey.

Around two-thirds of landlords rate their likely trading over the next three months as ‘very good’ or ‘good’, according to research by the National Landlords Association (NLA).

The sentiment survey asked 600 landlords their opinion about the private rented sector, and the general feeling was more than half (54 per cent) returned the top rating – up 8 per cent Continue reading Landlords Feel Good About Buy to Let Prospects


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