Tag Archives: Buy to Let Landlord

Tax Treatment of Equity Loans for Buy to Let Landlords Advice, Buy to Let News, Commercial Finance, Financial Advice, Landlord News, Latest Articles, Legal, Mortgage News, Property Investment Strategies, Tax and Accountancy, Tax News, UK Property Forum for Buy to Let Landlords

I have been posting on numerous forums about the introduction of equity loans into the UK buy to let mortgage market, a common question is the tax treatment.

Equity loans do not attract interest in the normal way, there are no regular monthly payments. One UK lender, funded by USA equity house JC Flower & Co. (a leading financial services investment company with funds in excess of £5billion) has entered the UK market and others may follow. Their return on investment is earned when the loan term expires or or sale or refinance of the property, whichever is sooner. Their return is capital plus a share in capital appreciation equal to double their investment. For example, if they provide top up finance of 10% of a property value their return with be 20% of the increased capital value plus their investment when the funding is redeemed.

As you may know, I was previously a former commercial finance broker. When I was practising I was renowned for digging into complex funding, tax and legal structures to explore opportunities and threats which others may never have considered.

Note to all – I no longer provide advice and this post must not be treated as advice.

The tax treatment of the redemption of BTL equity loans will be very interesting.

Let’s use this example. Equity loans can sit over and above traditional interest bearing mortgages but for the sake of simplicity I have based the following example on equity funding only.

Property value at outset £100,000
Equity loan at outset £20,000

Property value at sale £200,000
Capital gain £100,000 (or is it and if so how is it shared? – see below)
Equity loan capital repaid £20,000
Profit on Equity loan to lender £40,000

Now does the £40,000 profit on the equity loan to the lender reduce the owners capital gain to £60,000 or is the owners gain still treated as £100,000?

The lender operating the first of these schemes has already stated they will bill their return as interest at the point of loan redemption. However, that’s not to say HMRC will see it that way, only time will tell. Therefore, my suggestion to all landlords considering this type of finance is to plan for the worst and hope for the best in terms of tax treatment. As has been proven many times, the law says you can call something pretty much whatever you like but case law or legislation will determine what it really is. Case in point, advance rent or deposit? – see Johnson vs Old

So will profits made by equity lenders need to be used to offset rental profits? If so there could be a substantial paper loss created in the year of redemption. Unused losses may be rolled forward, assuming losses are made, but such losses are only offsettable against future rental profits. No problem, in fact potentially very advantageous, IF you continue to make rental profits going forward. However, if this was your only property you may be stuffed by having to pay CGT on the full £100,000 of gain and not being able to utilise the carry forward losses. Note that rental losses can not be used to reduce other taxable income.

I can’t see HMRC allowing landlords to choose how they apply the lenders return to suit their individual circumstances, i.e. as either interest or a share of capital gain,  but we can live in hope, not that that’s a good strategy of course! If HMRC do allow a choice to be made that would be utopia from a tax planners perspective 🙂

What I would suggest to all considering equity loans is that they should plan for the worst case tax scenario and hope for the best case tax scenario. In other words, make decisions based on the worst case tax scenario and if that works then fine. Obviously there are many other aspects of the deal to consider too which is why I am an advocate of taking professional advice as opposed to taking a short sighted approach and simply jumping into deals unadvised just to save initial fees.

If you are a portfolio landlord who makes good rental profits then treating the lenders return as interest could be extremely tax advantageous if the tax regime remains as it is today. This is because income tax rates are greater than capital gains tax rates for higher rate tax payers.

Therefore, for landlords who will continue to make rental profits, post redemption of their equity loans, this is particularly attractive in my opinion. At worst, if HMRC decide to treat the lenders returns as capital gains, landlords will pay a lower CGT bill and not be able to offset interest. For a landlords with no ongoing rental profits post redemption of an equity loan, having the lenders return treated an interest charge is highly unlikely to be attractive whereas having the returns treated as capital gains will be far better for them.

If, of course, your equity loan is secured against your private home then no CGT is payable on sale anyway.

Tax Treatment of Equity Loans for Buy to Let Landlords

Tax is not the only consideration.

I have listed 11 good reasons for considering the product and 9 downsides in my main post about equity loans. That’s not to say that everybody should think equity loans are the best thing since sliced bread just because my list of pro’s and cons is 11 vs 9, it doesn’t work that way. The reasons for NOT doing something can be very different to reasons FOR doing something, they are not necessarily like for like considerations. For example, I also prefer a strategy of high gearing combined with high liquidity over a low gearing strategy because that’s what suits me and my attitude to risk. It does not mean that people who prefer a different strategy are either wrong or right, it just proves we are all different, hence we have other preferences such as careers, holidays, cars, films, food and where we live.

For further information and discussion about equity loans please CLICK HERE.


Equity finance for buy to let landlords Advice, Buy to Let News, Commercial Finance, Landlord News, Latest Articles, Mortgage News, Property Investment News, Property Investment Strategies

Equity Finance for buy to let landlords

In this article I will explain the fundamental difference between equity finance for buy to let landlords and traditional buy to let mortgages facilities. Equity finance for buy to let landlords

Both are mortgages which are secured by a legal charge over a property.

Until recently, only traditional buy to let mortgage finance where interest or interest and capital are repaid monthly have been available. This type of finance is usually secured by a first legal charge over the property, also known as a mortgage.

Equity finance has tended only to be available to blue chip companies but that’s all changing. It’s now possible for landlords to secure equity finance on their buy to let property portfolio or even their own home and without even having to remortgage.

Equity finance doesn’t attract interest at all. In fact, there are no monthly payments whatsoever. Instead, the lender takes a stake in the capital appreciation of the property, typically at the end of the loan term or when the property is sold or refinanced. Additionally, equity finance can be secured by either a first or a second legal charge, hence it can be used as top up finance.

For further details please CLICK HERE


Venture Capital for Buy to Let Landlords Latest Articles

Until now it has not been possible for private landlords to access venture capital but times are changing.

Historically the only form of funding for buy to let investors has been mortgages, i.e. debt based finance where the returns for the provider comprise of fees and interest.

In the world of corporate finance it is common for business funding to comprise a mixture of both debt and equity finance.

Equity finance is different in that the provider makes a return by sharing profits, often when the business or asset is sold or refinanced. This form of capital is also know as mezzanine finance, private equity and venture capital amongst professional corporate advisers. Venture Capital for Buy to Let Landlords

A respected mortgage lender has now entered the  provide equity finance market and will be offering it’s products to private landlords. The lender will take a legal charge over rental property to protect their interests in much the same way as a traditional mortgage lender does, however, their charge will rank second to that of a traditional mortgage lender, thus enabling a mixture of debt and equity funding. A typical structure based will be:-

  • 65% debt on a traditional buy to let mortgage secured by first charge
  • 20% buy to let equity loan secured by second charge
  • 15% owners own funds

No interest or monthly repayments are made on the buy to let equity loan. The return for the lender comes when the property is sold or refinanced. The equity loan is repaid and the lender takes a 40% share of any capital gains. For example, if the property had increased in value by £100,000 the lender would take £40,000 of the profit plus return of capital. If the property had decreased in value the equity lender would still get their capital returned but would take 40% of zero profit, i.e. a zero return on investment.

For most buy to let landlords this very radical alternative to traditional mortgage financing alone will take some thinking through. There are pros and cons which I have thought through in quite some detail. For further details please CLICK HERE


BTL Second Charge Mortgages / No Monthly Payments Advice, Buy to Let News, Commercial Finance Broker Blog, Financial Advice, Landlord News, Latest Articles, Mortgage News, Property Investment News, Property Investment Strategies, Property News, UK Property Forum for Buy to Let Landlords

No this is NOT a wind up, it’s 100% genuine and is important that you know how it works so that at the very least you can make an informed decision about new financing choices which until now have been unavailable to buy to let landlords.

It really is a fantastic way to improve cashflow and rental profits or increase gearing without the need to remortgage.

A very credible mortgage lender (Castle Trust) is offering second charge buy to let mortgages with no interest charges and no monthly payments based on 20% of value subject to both the first and second mortgage combined not exceeding 85% LTV on BTL deals and 80% on your own home.

You can use the money in whatever way you wish, for example:-

  1. You can use it to pay down existing mortgages
  2. You can save the money for a rainy day
  3. You can use the money to buy more property
  4. In fact, you can blow it all at the local casino if your daft enough too!

So what’s the catch?

With no monthly payments or monthly interest charged, the lender must get paid somehow. This product works with a profit share basis, in that you borrow 20% of the value of your property the lender will take 40% of any increase in value – on sale or refinance.

You will also need to obtain permission from your existing mortgage lender for a second charge to be added.

Given that your equity in the property may represent as little as 15% of the value of the property and you will receive 60% of the capital appreciation you don’t need to be Einstein to work out that it’s better to use their money than yours, especially if you use the extra money raised to purchase more properties. Remember, you will not be making any payment or incurring any interest whatsoever until you sell or refinance.

Imagine if somebody put this deal to you …. I want to buy a property, you put 20% of the money and I will put in 15% and borrow the remaining 65%. I take all the rental profit/losses and when we eventually sell the property I will get 60% of the capital appreciation and you will get 40%. Oh and by the way, I will decide when we sell, OK? You would probably say no wouldn’t you? Well if you put that deal to Castle Trust, chances are they will say yes providing you have a good credit rating. It really is that good.

Basic criteria

The loan term can be up to 30 years if the equity loan is secured against your own home, 10 years if it’s a rental property.

Your total LTV must not exceed 85% on a rental property, 80% if the loan is secured on your own home..

There are no limits on the number of properties the lender will consider lending on per borrower and their maximum loan exposure to any one client is £1 million.

The minimum advance is £10,000.

For rental properties there is no requirement to have a first mortgage.

You must be able to prove that you have been a landlord for at least six months to qualify and you also need a decent credit score.

Pros and cons?

I can see several reasons why this will be attractive to landlords and I will be using this product myself for the following reasons …

  1. Deals may not stack up on rent to ordinarily qualify for an 85% LTV mortgage but may do so on this basis
  2. It’s a relatively easy way to raise capital against the security of your existing rental portfolio or your own home
  3. Improved cashflow when compared to a conventional mortgage for a higher amount
  4. Raise money without paying off an amazing tracker or fixed rate deal arranged pre-credit crunch
  5. Avoid potentially extortionate fees associated with refinancing
  6. Increase borrowing without affecting cashflow
  7. Use of other peoples money to increase leverage and returns on capital invested
  8. Castle Trust do not legal or valuation fees to arrange finance on your own home and their arrangement fees are only 1% of the advance. Valuations on rental properties cost £195+ VAT and conveyancing costs £216. This means that total fees are likely to be significantly less than arranging a conventional remortgage.
  9. Some landlords will wish to borrow 20% LTV via Castle Trust to partially redeem their mortgage with another lender and thus benefit from improved cashflow.
  10. Some landlords will wish to utilise this product to borrow more money
  11. Some landlords will wish to mix and match, i.e. reduce existing interest bearing debt and increase overall gearing to 85% LTV

Downsides

  1. Your risk is higher than that of Castle Trust because they get paid back before you do on the basis they have second charge over the property. Therefore, if the property decreases in value then you carry the majority of the risk. However, unless you’ve come to the end of the loan term it’s up to you to decide when you sell, they have no say in it.
  2. Future remortgaging may prove more difficult
  3. No new build property, i.e. properties built in the last two years
  4. The product is only available on properties located in England and Wales (not Scotland or Northern Ireland)
  5. 40% reduction in any future capital appreciation but you do need to consider that you may well be able to use the money to make a better return elsewhere
  6. The improved cashflow, in comparison to an higher traditional mortgage, will increase taxable income. However, many will see that it’s better to pay tax on profit than to have no profit at all
  7. Early repayment charge of 5% in year one
  8. If you wish to repay the loan without selling the property then you are committed to proving Castle Trust a return equal to the greater of 2% per year for the period which the loan has run or 40% of the rise in property price
  9. You will need to contact your existing mortgage lender before progressing matters to establish whether they will allow a second charge to be taken

We have no idea how long this funding will be available for so if this is of interest we recommend you to get in quickly. BTL Further Advances No Monthly Payments

We will be arranging introductions to brokers on a panel of specialist advisers which I have personally hand picked. The role of the adviser will be to review your portfolio and provide you with bespoke advice and quotations based upon your personal circumstances.

We are also considering the demand for free of charge introductions to a non-advised mortgage packager service. However, unless you consider yourself to be a sophisticated investor and in need of no advice and associated protection we strongly recommend you to obtain professional advice from our carefully selected panel of advisers.

Obviously we want to make some money out of this too so we are charging a fee of for introductions to our panel of professional advisers. By charging for the introductions we, and the advisers we are referring to, recognise that only serious enquirers will progress matters. This is a good way to ensure that our advisers are not bogged down answering questions from time wasters and also provides a very a good reason for our recommended advisers to prioritise our referrals.

Our fee for arranging an introduction to a professional adviser, who will visit you to provide face to face advice if that is required, is £200, payable to Innovative Landlord Solutions LLP (the legal owner of Property118.com) either by credit/debit card or via PayPal. You will then be contacted within 7 days.

Professional Adviser Introduction Request Form

  • Price: £ 200.00
    Fees are non-refundable


Shared Appreciation Mortgages for Buy to Let Landlords Advice, Buy to Let News, Commercial Finance, Commercial Finance Broker Blog, Financial Advice, Landlord News, Latest Articles, Mortgage News, Property Investment News, Property Investment Strategies, Property News

A radical shared appreciation mortgage product for buy to let landlords is soon to be launched.

The detailed criteria is yet to be released but we do have details of a product launched a few years ago by the same mortgage lender into the residential mortgage market. If we assume that the key features for the buy to let version will be similar, then landlords will be able to borrow 20% of the value of the property with no monthly payments or interest charges whatsoever against the security of a second charge. Up to a further 60% LTV would be able to be borrowed from a different mortgage lender which would take first charge.

In other words, you have to put down 20% deposit in cash on a purchase yourself and if you are refinancing, your total mortgage exposure (including the Shared Appreciation Mortgage), cannot be more than 80% of the value of the property.

Shared Appreciation Mortgages for Buy to Let Landlords

The mortgage lender offering this product (Castle Trust) is well funded via venture capital and is a credible and trusted lender. They only operate via an exclusive panel of mortgage packagers and their network partners.

The way Castle Trust will make their money is by sharing in any capital growth when the property is sold, or in 25 years, or when the borrower reaches age 75, whichever is the sooner.

The product for residential borrowers is based on the lender taking a 40% share in the growth in the value of the property whilst the owner takes 60%. Not bad considering each party is only putting in 20% is it? In fairness though, the property owner does carry the lions share of the risk as the shared appreciation mortgage provider is secured with a second charge.

As an example, based on a property value of £100,000 the figures would work as follows:-

  • Traditional mortgage £60,000
  • Shared Appreciation Mortgage £20,000
  • Owners equity £20,000

Now let’s assume the property is eventually sold for £200,000 – the following is what each party would get back …

  • £60,000 to the traditional mortgage lender (assuming it was an interest only loan and no fees were added)
  • £60,000 to the shared  appreciation mortgage lender (i.e. £20,000 original capital plus 40% of £100,000 growth)
  • £80,000 to the property owner being the balance.

In this example the property owner would quadruple his capital invested and only be paying interest on 75% of his total mortgage liability.

I can see several reasons why this may be attractive to landlords if the BTL product is similar to the version available to residential mortgage borrowers:-

  1. Deals may not stack up on rent to ordinarily qualify for an 80% LTV mortgage but may do so on this basis
  2. Improved cashflow due to only having to service interest on a maximum of 75% of the debt
  3. At 60% LTV many BTL mortgages are significantly more competitive
  4. Landlords will be able to increase their borrowing without affecting their cashflow
  5. Use of other peoples money to increase leverage and returns on capital invested
  6. Castle Trust will rely upon the mortgage valuation of the traditional mortgage lender. Therefore you only have to pay for one valuation.
  7. Castle Trust do not legal or valuation fees and their arrangement fees are only 1% of the advance. This means that total fees could be less than if you arrange a traditional mortgage for a higher Loan to Value.
  8. Castle Trust do not require the consent of a lender providing the first charge. Therefore, the product is technically available to any landlord with borrowings of 80% LTV
  9. Some landlords will wish to borrow 20% LTV via Castle Trust to partially redeem their mortgage with another lender and thus benefit from improved cashflow.

Downsides

  1. The property owner gives away a substantial share of any capital gain
  2. The improved cashflow, in comparison to an higher traditional mortgage, will increase taxable income
  3. Remortgaging may prove difficult
  4. The product is only available on properties located in England and Wales (not Scotland or Northen Ireland)

Questions I can’t answer yet

  • In the example above, has the property owner made a £60,000 capital gain or a £100,000 capital gain?
  • Which buy to let lenders will allow a second charge to be taken over the property for a new purchase?
  • Whether the BTL product will be a mirror of the residential mortgage conditions
  • There are also rumours of 85% overall exposure being offered

We are expecting to receive full details within the next few weeks and funds are expected to be limited. Therefore, if this is of interest we recommend you to get in quickly.

We will be arranging introductions to brokers on our panel of specialist advisers which I have personally hand picked. The role of the adviser will be to review your portfolio and provide you with bespoke advice and quotations based upon your personal circumstances.

The fee for arranging an introduction is £200, payable to Innovative Landlord Solutions LLP (the legal owner of Property118.com) either by credit/debit card or via PayPal. You will then be contacted within 7 days of the product being launched with a view to arranging a priority appointment.

To register please complete the form below.

Professional Adviser Introduction Request Form

  • Price: £ 200.00
    Fees are non-refundable


Mortgage Express or Mortgage Distress? Advice, Buy to Let News, Cautionary Tales, Financial Advice, Landlords Stories, Latest Articles, Mortgage News, Property Investment News, Property Investment Strategies, UK Property Forum for Buy to Let Landlords

The Mortgage Express exit strategy has been a hot potato since at least 2011 when they first met a group of 70 landlords at an event organised under the Property Tribes banner. Mortgage Express or Mortgage Distress

They have been slated by landlords for imposing terms and conditions which were buried in small print and which are no longer adopted by the mainstream buy to let lenders.

The bottom line for MX though is that their loan book is now the property of the UK tax payers and the organisation is pretty much run by Civil Servants, accountants, debt collectors/councillors and insolvency practitioners.

The Government have imposed tough targets and deadlines on the new MX team to reduce the loan book and therefore, it was inevitable that strong arm tactics, which many would describe as bullying, would be used.

Naturally they have gone for the easy targets and started by selling the concept of making over-payments to people who were too naive to work out that repaying a loan which typically costs 2.25% rarely makes sense. It’s possible to get a better return on that with a cash ISA or a deposit account in a bank or building society!  MX appear to have had scant regard to advising their clients to pay off more expensive credit first and they were never going to suggest investing any surplus into anything but reducing a debt with them were they?

The strong arm tactics have extended to imposing their “Right to Consolidate” which their contracts say allows them to use 100% of any sale proceeds to repay debts owed to them. It has even been implied on many occasions that if a borrower redeems one mortgage with Mortgage Express they can call in the rest! I’ve not seen these terms challenged in Court yet but I have come across borrowers who had stood up to Mortgage Express and there are quite a few examples on internet forums of MX having backed off. Bullies don’t like people who fight back.

Mortgage Express Reviews

General sentiment of landlords is that Mortgage Express borrowers should avoid reviews like the plague. The conspiracy theorists, of which I am one, are that MX have a very simple agenda and it’s not based on helping borrowers despite how they pitch it. It would appear the entire purpose of the meeting is for MX to persuade you to pay off or reduce your debt and/or to look for you to trip yourself up by admitting to breaching mortgage conditions which you were not necessarily aware of. Examples include:-

  • living in a property financed as a BTL
  • Letting a property which was financed as a private residence
  • letting to tenants which are now claiming benefits
  • where a property is an HMO

Would you know whether your tenants were claiming benefits though? What if they started claiming benefits after the tenancy started? What if the property became an HMO due to your local authority imposing selective or additional licencing?

Is it fair that MX could find one little problem, call in that loan and then call all the others in based on their right to consolidate conditions?

My Preferred Mortgage Express Exit Strategy

It has been mooted on several forums that MX have a target to collect a percentage of their loan book. I’m not aware whether the percentage target has ever been published but I’ve heard figures as low as 25% banded about. I suspect it’s much higher than that, otherwise, why would they carry the heavy administrative costs of their current activities as opposed to simply selling their loan book for 25% of it’s value? Perhaps they could and it’s a simple case of government ineptitude and politics preventing this from occurring? More likely, in my opinion, is that the government want to be seen to try to recover as much as possible of the tax payers bail out money.

If we knew what the desired recovery percentage was we could make suggestions. Let’s suppose the figure is 60%. Most buy to let landlords would happily refinance if their loans were discounted by far less than that. I’d certainly consider moving for a 25% to 30% write off of debt. Not every borrower would want or be in a position to go for such a deal but if only half did so, the remaining book, which I suspect would include a lot of toxic dent and low value assets due to negative equity, could still be shifted. They may only get 40 pence in the pound for these assets as a block sale but those extra 10% to 15% figures they would get from borrowers taking up their offers directly could well make up the balance.

Why don’t Mortgage Express just exit now?

I suspect it’s only a matter of time before Mortgage Express start offering golden goodbye deals to borrowers, it’s just a case of satisfying the tax payer that they’ve tried everything else first. Mortgage Express were given 7 years to exit and it is because we are into the final states of that period we are seeing them apply increasing pressure. Those of us who can survive the next few years will, I suspect, come out of this with a great deal but in the meantime we should expect the unexpected as well as underhand tactics.

What would you do if you were Mortgage Express?

What do you think Mortgage Express borrowers should and should not do to protect their interests?

Don’t be bullied by Mortgage Express

Before you agree to do anything with Mortgage Express talk to your fellow landlords. Go along to Landlords Association meetings or post comments/questions below or on Property Tribes. If Mortgage Express do bully you, fight back. If you don’t want to meet them don’t meet them. If they get aggressive with you just bear in mind that there are thousands of other Mortgage Express borrowers who are likely to have had similar experiences. Focus on the ideas that are legal and make the most sense. There are reported to be in the region of 50,000 Mortgage Express buy to let borrowers.

Via this link we have an excellent story as it unfolds of a landlord who was being forced to sell his home by Mortgage Express. It’s a very long discussion thread which was contributed to by several landlords and property professionals. To cut a long story short the landlord got his MP on side and Mortgage Express backed off.

Mortgage Express problems - You are NOT alone

 


Protection for families of property investors Advice, Buy to Let News, Estate Planning, Financial Advice, Guest Articles, Guest Columns, Landlord News, Landlords Insurance, Latest Articles, Property Investment News, Property Investment Strategies, UK Property Forum for Buy to Let Landlords

With growing and easier access to BTL mortgage funds comes the inevitable increase in borrowing, or as I like to call it … debt.Protection for families of property investors

BTL is the generic term, of course, for property investment, and for many people investing relies on having the right ‘debt’ in place to make those acquisitions and investments.

Many investors fit this profile; Continue reading Protection for families of property investors


Low value buy to let mortgages Landlord News, Latest Articles, Property News

Low Value Buy to Let mortgagesI am absolutely amazed that in this current economic climate with the government making people down size to smaller homes or pay a “bedroomTax” and more people having to rent because they cannot afford to buy, that a buy to let landlord cannot obtain a mortgage for property valued under £40,000.

I own a Ten property portfolio great credit rating and employed status to show income, I can get £100-£150k mortgages no problem.

However at my location the most lucrative properties are one bedroom Uni Flats current market value £35 to £40K, over the past 20 years I have own over 20 of them and have just bough another for £25k cash refurbished it for £3k and have a Tenant paying £315 per month.

The question is why cant I get a Buy to Let mortgage?

Not only is the risk to the Lender minimal should the worst happen, the loss would be minimal. Lending lots of smaller amounts would mean lots more in fees and it is the sector which the government agree needs the most help i.e. homes for young people, single parents  affordable housing.

What do you think?

Are there any decent deals out there for low value buy to let mortgages?

Ray Doyle


Are Rent Guarantees Worth Buying? Guest Articles, Insurance, Landlord News, Landlords Insurance, Latest Articles, Letting, Lettings & Management, Property News

Rent GuaranteeIncreasing rents, a difficult economy and job losses mean a growing number of tenants are struggling to pay their rent. When rental income is relied upon to cover a buy-to-let mortgage, arrears can be a very real risk and it doesn’t look like the economy is going to improve significantly any time soon.

As rents typically increase towards the summer months, we could see tenant’s budgets being squeezed, leading to some unwanted arrears. The question is, if you’re a buy to let landlord, how can you protect yourself against every landlord’s worst nightmare: a tenant who can’t, or won’t, pay the rent? Continue reading Are Rent Guarantees Worth Buying?


Brokers Review of Aldermore Bank’s Buy to Let Mortgages Buy to Let News, Landlord News, Latest Articles, Mortgage News, Property Investment News, Property News

Aldermore Bank have recently refreshed their buy to let rates and terms. I asked my mortgage broker what he thought and what the interesting features are for buy to let landlords within the Aldermore product range.

His response was:-Brokers Review of Aldermore Bank's Buy to Let Mortgages Continue reading Brokers Review of Aldermore Bank’s Buy to Let Mortgages


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