Housing: The Key Battleground in the Upcoming Election

Housing: The Key Battleground in the Upcoming Election

11:25 AM, 24th June 2024, About 3 weeks ago 34

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As we edge closer to the next general election, housing has become a pivotal issue in the political arena – beyond our usual daily bubbles. The housing crisis, affecting millions across the country, is set to be a significant talking point, with each party vying to present the most compelling solutions (of course). Do you believe any of them?

The Labour Party’s Vision

Labour has pledged a transformative approach to tackle the housing crisis head-on. Their proposal centres around a massive house-building program aimed at delivering affordable homes at an unprecedented scale. By promising to construct 150,000 social homes annually, Labour seeks to address the dire shortage in the rental sector, which has been plagued by skyrocketing rents and limited availability. Spoiler alert – what they are suggesting is impossible – certainly in the first couple of years – and exceedingly difficult and expensive in the second half of what looks like their first term for nearly 15 years.

Additionally, Labour’s plans include implementing stronger rent controls and enhancing tenants’ rights. By abolishing Section 21 ‘no-fault’ evictions, they aim to provide renters with greater security and stability, a move that has garnered significant support from tenant advocacy groups. However, these proposals have gone down like a lead balloon among landlords. One argument is that stricter regulations will deter investment in the rental market. The interest rate has already done an incredible amount of heavy lifting in that department.

The Conservative Party’s Response

In response, the Conservative Party has put forward its own set of ambitious housing policies. Their focus is on homeownership, with a promise to help more people climb the property ladder. The Conservatives propose extending the Right to Buy scheme to housing association tenants, allowing them to purchase their homes at a discount – bridging the gap so “no-one” (read – everyone) is out of pocket.

Moreover, the party aims to simplify the planning process to expedite the construction of new homes. By cutting red tape and incentivizing developers, they hope to boost the supply of housing and make homeownership more attainable for first-time buyers. Critics, however, argue that these measures may not go far enough to address the root causes of the housing crisis, particularly the lack of affordable rental properties.

A Cross-Party Consensus?

Despite their differing approaches, there is a growing recognition among all parties that urgent action is needed to address the housing crisis. Both Labour and the Conservatives acknowledge the importance of increasing housing supply, though they differ on the methods to achieve this goal.

The Liberal Democrats and the Green Party also contribute to the housing debate, advocating for environmentally sustainable developments and greater support for local communities in housing decisions. Their emphasis on sustainability and community involvement highlights the multifaceted nature of the housing issue, which requires a comprehensive and collaborative approach. In the real world, we dream of cross-party consensus!

Reform

Not in the sector – per se – but the party. The only one really appealing to landlords, moving skilfully into the space left wide open over the past 9 years after the “legendary” 2015 Gideon Osborne budget. The hostile environment, revisited.

So simple – but of course moving into that space only works for Reform. It wouldn’t be congruent with anyone else’s ideology. A friend put it so eloquently this week (the sort of friend who you would describe as Tory, through and through):

“Have you read the Reform manifesto?

Not much to dislike in there!!

Ok it’s all unfunded and they are horrid racists but you can’t have everything.

I genuinely think I’m going to have to vote for them. My first ever time not ticking the blue box. Sniff.”

We aren’t in the same place – but it is fair to say we share some common ground in that quote.

I feel very conflicted over the Reform “contract”. Some parts – frankly – are completely correct. Other parts are extremely naive, particularly economically, which has me very worried.

The Electoral Implications

As housing becomes a central issue in the election campaign, voters will closely scrutinize each party’s proposals. The electorate’s decision will be influenced not only by the feasibility of these plans but also by their potential impact on everyday lives. With housing affordability at the forefront of public concern, the party that presents the most viable and appealing solutions is likely to gain significant traction. The chief issue is that none of these solutions are really viable, and we will have 5 more years of hurt coming our way. It will take a genuine miracle – that miracle being genuine political will to make a difference in housing.

In conclusion, the upcoming election will see housing as a crucial battleground, with parties striving to convince voters that they hold the key to solving the housing crisis. As we approach the election, it will be fascinating to see how these proposals evolve and how they resonate with the public. One thing is clear: housing will play a decisive role in shaping the political landscape in the days, weeks and months to come.


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Cider Drinker

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18:33 PM, 22nd June 2024, About 3 weeks ago

Reform are not ‘horrid racists’. I find that terribly offensive.

Patriotism is not racism.

Mark Alexander - Founder of Property118

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20:43 PM, 22nd June 2024, About 3 weeks ago

Superb video. It really demonstrates the depth of your knowledge. Well done 👏👏👏

GlanACC

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22:00 PM, 22nd June 2024, About 3 weeks ago

I don't think housing will be the central issue, its likely to be illegal immigration (yes I suppose that is housing in a way) or the great money pit of the NHS.

Adam Lawrence

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20:53 PM, 23rd June 2024, About 3 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by Cider Drinker at 22/06/2024 - 18:33
If you read it carefully, those were not my words, and I was clear I didn't agree with the whole statement.

The situation is better framed as:

Some of the Reform candidates ARE horrid racists - that much is incontrovertible. Certainly not the majority.

OR

The racists will likely vote for Reform, but that doesn't make Reform the racists.

The system wants those anywhere near the middle to struggle to stand with Reform - it's the best hope that they've got (not necessarily for now but for next time around).

Reform aren't going away.

Adam Lawrence

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20:54 PM, 23rd June 2024, About 3 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by Mark Alexander - Founder of Property118 at 22/06/2024 - 20:43
Thank you - appreciated!

Adam Lawrence

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20:56 PM, 23rd June 2024, About 3 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by GlanACC at 22/06/2024 - 22:00
Immigration and housing

vs

Immigration and jobs

vs

Immigration and integration/culture

Three different debates, but of the three, I think that housing has the largest impact/overlap

I respect the fact that Reform speak about reform (no kidding) of the NHS when everyone else is a bit scared to do so - I'm not sure their plan is the right one, mind, but just saying the words "it needs reform" is a step in the right direction.

Cider Drinker

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21:51 PM, 23rd June 2024, About 3 weeks ago

It’s not about immigration. It’s about managing the size of the population.

Otherwise, what will the population be in a decade or two? 100 million? More?

Can houses be built to meet the needs?

Can the NHS cope with millions more patients?

What about the sewer system. Or schools, water supplies, energy supplies.

There must be a number otherwise nobody can plan properly.

GlanACC

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7:04 AM, 24th June 2024, About 3 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by Cider Drinker at 23/06/2024 - 21:51
Interestingly, the UK like Japan has a falling birth rate.

Cider Drinker

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8:45 AM, 24th June 2024, About 3 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by GlanACC at 24/06/2024 - 07:04We have a falling birth rate which opens the way for us to have the opportunity to allow more people to come and live in the U.K.
Interestingly, one in three children born in the UK are born to mothers that were not born in the U.K.
Coupkes that work can’t afford children. This means the next generation are being brought up with role models that don’t work. Scary.

Blodwyn

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9:57 AM, 24th June 2024, About 3 weeks ago

Both the main parties are fiddling at the edges. L&T law and management and enforcement of rights and responsibilities both ways need what we are unlikely to ever get. A sensible cross party free of slogan discussion with a genuine wish and ability to arrive at workable solutions for the future.

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