Help For Tenants – NO FEES!

by Mark Alexander

16:20 PM, 11th December 2014
About 5 years ago

Help For Tenants – NO FEES!

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Help For Tenants – NO FEES!

Help For Tenants

Both landlords and tenants have rights.

At Property118 we provide FREE help for landlords and tenants in dispute. Perhaps more importantly though, our impartial mediation seeks win/win solutions for both landlords and tenants. Please don’t risk cutting off your nose to spite your face – read on.

Very few landlords are outright criminals but sadly, crooks can be found operating in every sector.

We want to help YOU!

To find out why and how please keep reading.

Coming from somebody like me, a landlord myself, the above probably sounds a bit strange or even far fetched. However, like most GOOD Landlords, I am frustrated at how landlords in general are so often demonised by media and propaganda organisations. Some of the worst offenders have been housing charities!

Worse still, I despise organisations who promote and relish in conflict, and profit off the backs of other peoples misery.

Neither landlords nor tenants want legal battles, so why do so many organisations strive to build a “them and us” culture?

Surely it’s better to be solution conscious?

No tenant deserves to be robbed of their deposit or illegally evicted, I think that’s a fair starting point for us all.

By the same token, no GOOD Landlord wants their hard work and investments to be governed by unnecessary additional red tape and bureaucracy.

Sadly, when extremist organisations get their way, and when more legislation is introduced, this results in rent rises to fund the additional costs of compliance. In extreme cases this can lead to less availability of quality rental property, e.g. landlords choosing not to invest further, or even disinvest in some areas (Newham in London is a classic example).

Tenants don’t want more red tape, bureaucracy and costs any more than landlords do, hence we must look for solutions together.

GOOD Landlords like me are happy to help tenants who have been unjustly victimised. Together we have an opportunity to put things right and perhaps even put some of the bad guys and the criminals out of business, and of course teach those who are naive and/or greedy their responsibilities.

Wherever possible, we prefer to help landlords and tenants to patch up their differences amicably. Only in the most extreme cases will we recommend legal action.

Here at Property118, landlords who subscribe to our forums have helped several tenants by providing them with free advice and, where appropriate, we have even introduced tenants to specialist solicitors, some of which will even consider taking on cases on a no-win-no-fee basis.

Property118 was created to facilitate the sharing of best practice amongst UK landlords, tenants and letting agents. The GOOD Landlords Campaign was created to raise the necessary funding to pursue this mission.

So here’s my proposal …..

Tell me your story by completing the form below and I will personally look into your case and do all that I can to help you.

I ask just three things of you by way of return:-

1) That you give me permission to publish your story on a no names basis

2) That if I provide you with assistance you let me know how you get on

3) That you will consider making a donation to Property118. This will help us to continue to provide this service for others in your position – see >>> http://www.property118.com/donations/43590/

My complaint against my landlords is ....



Comments

Mark Alexander

22:51 PM, 15th December 2014
About 5 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "AA Properties Wales " at "15/12/2014 - 21:29":

Illegal eviction isn't a new law.

Perhaps you are confusing this with the defeated Revenge Eviction Bill?

As you know, there is an attempt to sneak this through again by adding it to the Deregulation Bill very late in the day. Rest assured, I am all over this, as are many other Centres of Influence within the PRS.
.

Robert Mellors

23:28 PM, 15th December 2014
About 5 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Mark Alexander" at "15/12/2014 - 22:24":

Hi Mark

I made quite a lot of comments on that thread at the time. Yeah, the service is fine for chasing defaulting tenants that are working or have substantial assets I guess, but I made enquiries at the time with this "recommended" company and several others, and none of them are interested in low value cases or ones where the debtor has few assets. The particular recommended company also, I seem to recall, needed copies of every single document for each case, e.g. every letter written, every text received, etc, etc, before they would even consider looking at taking on a case and chasing the debt. I would have had to have sent them dozens if not hundreds of pages of documents for every debt case!!! - Fat lot of use that is!

That is also not the same as a no win no fee solicitor willing to take on the bad tenants, sue them, and enforce the judgement, all for no upfront charge and only payment by results, which is, in effect, what you were offering to tenants.

Robert Mellors

23:38 PM, 15th December 2014
About 5 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Mark Alexander" at "15/12/2014 - 22:28":

Again, this is great if the debtor is stupid enough to let the bailiff into the home, but most tenants are without substantial assets and would not let the bailiff (HCEO) in, and the bailiff/sheriff/HCEO has no right to force entry. In effect, they are powerless unless the debtor invites them in to take away their possessions.

How about campaigning for deductions from tenant's welfare benefits for former tenant arrears? (we can get them for current tenants, but not for former tenants who owe us money).

Mark Alexander

23:38 PM, 15th December 2014
About 5 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Robert Mellors" at "15/12/2014 - 23:28":

Hi Robert

I'm not providing legal services, merely introducing them where I deem it appropriate to do so and mediation isn't a realistic option.

I cannot introduce services which do not exist or that I am unaware of.
.

Mark Alexander

23:43 PM, 15th December 2014
About 5 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Robert Mellors" at "15/12/2014 - 23:38":

Hi Robert

in response to your comment ..... "How about campaigning for deductions from tenant’s welfare benefits for former tenant arrears? (we can get them for current tenants, but not for former tenants who owe us money)."

I wasn't aware of that, what excuse are Courts using not to order deductions from a former tenants benefits?
.

Robert Mellors

23:57 PM, 15th December 2014
About 5 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Mark Alexander" at "15/12/2014 - 23:43":

They don't need an excuse, this is not a remedy available to the county courts, so it is not an enforcement option they could give even if they wanted to.

Magistrates Courts can do this, e.g. for fines or council tax recovery.

Utility companies can get payment direct, but again only for the current address, not debts relating to a former address.

Landlords can get direct deductions for rent arrears (at the set rate of £3.65 pw) for the current address, but not for arrears owed at a previous address (former tenancy).

Thus, for landlords dealing with DSS tenants, the law provides no remedy whatsoever. Lots of free help for tenants, but sweet FA for landlords. - Is this fair? - of course not, but nobody campaigns to change this! - Just me, and my lone voice has no effect.

Mark Alexander

0:08 AM, 16th December 2014
About 5 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Robert Mellors" at "15/12/2014 - 23:57":

Try using your line voice to start a campaign here at Property118.

Call me in the morning to discuss how I can help you.
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Monty Bodkin

2:10 AM, 16th December 2014
About 5 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Robert Mellors" at "15/12/2014 - 23:57":

Hello Robert,

"Landlords can get direct deductions for rent arrears (at the set rate of £3.65 pw) for the current address"

Has that amount just been increased? (might be wrong)

http://www.legislation.gov.uk/uksi/2014/2888/pdfs/uksi_20142888_en.pdf

6. (c) in paragraph 7(5) (rent and service charges included in rent) for the words “equal to 5%”,substitute “which is no less than 10% and no more than 20%

Robert Mellors

8:10 AM, 16th December 2014
About 5 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Monty Bodkin" at "16/12/2014 - 02:10":

Hi Monty

This is the legislation in relation to Universal Credit, but I think at last count only about 40,000 claimants had been moved on to (it seems to be running about 18 months behind schedule), so yes it will be increasing, but at the moment, for the vast majority of claimants, it is still £3.65 pw (and probably will be for a few years yet, ignoring the tiny annual increase each April of course).

David Asker

8:44 AM, 16th December 2014
About 5 years ago

Rob,

I've said it before and I'll say it again that as HCEOs we certainly have a lot more success than you give us credit for.

In the first instance we do not have to be "invited in" and can enter through an unlocked or open door. If there is a vehicle outside then this is often the tool that can be used to either get payment or entry to the property.

The key point where the debtor does not have significant assets is that our enforcement agents have significant skills of negotiation. These include carefully explaining the consequences on non payment and selling the 'working with us' approach. This in itself will often get us into the property.

It should also be remembered that a judgment lasts for six years and this could mean that any credit the debtor wants within that time, like tenancy agreements, loans, mortgages etc. will often be refused.

Enforcement of that judgment can continue also so whilst we may not collect payment in full today do they really want to be scared of who is knocking on the door for the next 6 years or so? These are just some of the reasons that are carefully explained to a debtor during enforcement that will often get them onside and making payments.

Of course, this kind of enforcement is not always the appropriate option and each case must be considered on it merits. We are not miracle workers and if the debtor is unemployed and has no assets whatsoever I would suggest you look at other options.

However, give the small outlay to instruct an HCEO (just £60) it is often a financially attractive option for any landlord.

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