Don’t use the ‘L’ word

Don’t use the ‘L’ word

8:32 AM, 5th January 2022, About 3 weeks ago 71

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The majority of the Buy to Let community say they would prefer not to be called “landlords”, according to research from mortgage intermediary Mortgages For Business. Some parts of the US media, including regional divisions of NBC, have reportedly stopped using the word “landlord” due to complaints from the community.

When it came to the UK, 59% of those surveyed by Mortgages for Business said they wanted the British media to stop using the word “landlord” and that the term was dated.

When the Buy to Let community was polled on their preferred name, 43% said “Small Housing Providers”, 36% said they would prefer to remain “Landlords”, and 21% opted for other options including “Rental Accommodation Provider”.

Gavin Richardson, managing director of Mortgages for Business said: “Sections of the media have vilified the buy-to-let community.  The government has hammered them – think Theresa May’s 3% Stamp Duty surcharge and other tax deterrents.  It’s got to the point where the buy-to-let community doesn’t want to be associated with the term ‘landlord’ anymore.  The term carries much more baggage than it once did. No wonder the community wants a rebrand.”

Additionally, 73% of those surveyed said they felt “unfairly portrayed as this generation’s financial bogeyman”.  Only 8% felt that landlords were not “financial bogeymen” at all while the remainder accepted that their notoriety might not be entirely unwarranted.

Gavin Richardson said: “The majority of landlords are paying 40 per cent tax on their rental income – plus stamp duty – which means the Government is profiting hugely from Generation Rent.  And to what end?  Hammering landlords over the last five years has done first-time buyers no favours – research from Nationwide suggests first-time buyers now need to save a huge 113 per cent of their annual salary for a typical home deposit of 20 per cent!

“What would happen if we took landlords out of the housing equation?  The impact on the property market would be significant and almost entirely negative.  It’s not as if the Government is pouring money into social housing – or making any progress on house building.  Frankly, the Government should be championing landlords and lauding their contribution to the housing sector – landlords are bailing the Government out!”

“On top of that, millions of Brits face a financial crisis in retirement by not putting enough money aside for their pension.    Two thirds of employees aged 45 and over face poverty in old age unless they act soon.  One in five Britons say they have no form of private or workplace pension.  It is regularly drummed into us that we need to invest for a comfortable retirement.  And yet, when people start building a nest-egg – investing in property to try to ensure they have an income for their retirement – they are reviled!”



Comments

by Boble

21:07 PM, 8th January 2022, About 3 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by JB at 07/01/2022 - 11:42
They tend to refer to themselves as pub landlords, or though they are "licencees".

by Boble

21:22 PM, 8th January 2022, About 3 weeks ago

There have been some really weird comments in this thread. I don't like the term Landlord, so only use it in legal documents, in order to conform with that requirement. If I have to visit one of my properties, I refer to myself as the owner of the building (or as applicable). When asked what my occupation is, I say "property investor". When asked my job title I say "company director". However, my tenants or lessees tend to introduce me as "the landlord".

by Seething Landlord

21:30 PM, 8th January 2022, About 3 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by Boble at 08/01/2022 - 21:22
Yes well your tenants are hardly going to introduce you as as the property investor are they? To them you are the landlord which is the only accurate way of describing your relationship with them.

by Bemused

21:39 PM, 8th January 2022, About 3 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by Seething Landlord at 08/01/2022 - 21:30
My tenants call me by my name. No smart arse comments please!

by Boble

22:05 PM, 8th January 2022, About 3 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by Bemused at 08/01/2022 - 21:39
As do mine.

by Chris @ Possession Friend

22:42 PM, 8th January 2022, About 3 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by Boble at 08/01/2022 - 22:05
as do my tenants, - call me by my first name ( but its important for them to know I'm the 'Landlord' and not their mate from down the pub. )

by Seething Landlord

22:59 PM, 8th January 2022, About 3 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by Boble at 08/01/2022 - 22:11
Are you trying to compete with me to win the prize for most weird contribution?

To be honest, I regard this whole discussion as inconsequential nonsense and a bit of a joke, fit only for passing the time on a wet Saturday. I don't care two hoots what people call me but in law when I let property I am a landlord and like it or not, so are you.

by Old Mrs Landlord

23:07 PM, 8th January 2022, About 3 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by Boble at 08/01/2022 - 21:07The term employed in the trade is Licensed Victualler" which I believe is the correct legal description of a "pub landlord" or landlady.

by Boble

0:13 AM, 9th January 2022, About 3 weeks ago

Yes, if they were asked to formally state their occupation.

by Boble

0:25 AM, 9th January 2022, About 3 weeks ago

Reply to the comment left by Seething Landlord at 08/01/2022 - 22:59
I think it is clear for my comments that I acknowledge the legal term "landlord". I simply chose not to use the terms other than when legally required to do so.

As you have may be aware, there are instances when the term "landlord" in the context of "rented" premises is entirely incorrect. A common example being licences to occupy, when the term is "licensor" or "grantor".


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