Two Residences and lodgers

by Readers Question

3 years ago

Two Residences and lodgers

Make Text Bigger
Two Residences and lodgers

Currently I have a residential mortgage and have permission for two lodgers; I now have two lodgers residing with me. Two Residences and lodgers

I wish to purchase a property in Swindon which is where I work with my Girlfriend but don’t wish to prevent myself or her from staying in my current home, it’s convenient for seeing friends and family at the weekends.

I pay the council tax on my current home and will pay the council tax on my new home. I don’t wish to force the lodgers out as they are effectively paying for the mortgage, however I’m not sure what the legalities are for this arrangement when I have two residences. I am also aware that I do not want a buy to let as this would prevent me from living at my current residence.

Does have anyone have any knowledge how I can keep this arrangement?

Also, currently I use the rent a room scheme for Tax on the room because it’s at my home.

Would I still be able to do this or would I have to calculate tax as a normal rental as it’s not my sole residence.

Thanks

James



Comments

Mark Alexander

3 years ago

Hi James

I may be over simplifying the situation, however, have you considered making one property your principle private residence and the other your girlfriends?
.

James dengel

3 years ago

Hey Mark, thanks for your quick answer.

Do I just say one is my girlfriends and the other is mine.
What do I do about the council Tax ? I believed that I would have to be registered where I live the most being Swindon. Or do I just keep paying it in my old place ?

Mark Alexander

3 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "James dengel" at "02/06/2015 - 12:22":

Hi James

Several people work away from home during the week and go home at weekends. Their principal private residence is the one they choose to call home. I am not aware that any timescales apply to that.

So in answer to your question, yes, one property can be your girlfriends home, the other can be yours. It doesn't really matter who owns the properties or who pay the bills.
.

Mandy Thomson

3 years ago

Hi James,

From a legal viewpoint, you can simply maintain your current property as your MAIN home, just treating the second property as a second home.

Many live in landlords do this, usually because their workplace is too far away, or they travel most of the time with work. For example, I knew a lodger landlord who was in the navy, and spent most of his time away at sea, while still successfully letting to a lodger.

If you keep most of your belongings at your main home, use it as your address for official purposes and spend SOME time there on a regular basis, the people you rent to will legally remain as lodgers.

However, ensure you that you do do this, because if you're hardly ever there, your lodgers may be able to successfully argue that they are in fact now tenants, and as such claim exclusive possession of the property.

Last but not least, your lodgers obviously need to be people that you can trust implicitly.


Leave Comments

Please Log-In OR Become a member to reply to comments or subscribe to new comment notifications.

Forgotten your password?

OR

BECOME A MEMBER

Review of Selective Licensing announced