LANDLORDS – don’t let tenants steal your property

by Property 118

5 years ago

LANDLORDS – don’t let tenants steal your property

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LANDLORDS – don’t let tenants steal your property

Don't Let Tenants Steal Your PropertyIs it even possible that tenants could steal a property you might ask!

As part of its campaign to stamp out property fraud, the Land Registry has just set up a dedicated phone line for home-owners who think they may be the victims of fraud. You can now ring 0300 006 7030 if you think someone else is trying to sell or mortgage your property, to alert Registry staff.

Property fraud has become a major headache in recent years, and Landlords are particularly vulnerable. Cases have been reported where tenants have masqueraded as their landlord and sold or mortgaged a property, then disappeared with the proceeds.

Here are some recommendations to help prevent fraud:

  • Make sure that the Land Registry has your correct current address is on the title register.
  • Register more than one address – you can register up to three addresses for service of notices, including an email address. The address of your Solicitor or other agent could be included. It is best not to include the property address unless you also live at the property you are letting.
  • Get a restriction registered on the title – this prevents any sale or mortgage being registered unless a Solicitor or conveyancer certifies that they are satisfied that the person selling or mortgaging the property is the true owner. There is currently no fee for registering such a notice if you are not an owner-occupier.
  • If your property title is currently unregistered, get it registered straight away.

Your Solicitor will be able to give more advice, or for more information see http://www.landregistry.gov.uk/public/guides/

This guest article was kindly provided by Tony Lilleystone

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