Condensation Solution?

Condensation Solution?

8:14 AM, 12th June 2015, About 7 years ago 29

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I have a flat with a concrete roof. It is top floor and the roof is flat. Below that by some 2-3 feet is a suspended ceiling with a grid/frame of tiles. Condensation Solution

My problem is condensation. There has been a steady drip of water onto the tiles from the cold roof. This also results in damp on the walls within the living space below.

I have been recommended a PIV system by Envirovent, who I am probably going to get in to do a survey.

First, I wondered what people’s thoughts might be? There is no leak – I have had a flat roof specialist look into it, and I’ve been up top myself. He tells me it is all condensation.

Would a PIV system cure this problem? How much should I expect to pay (if you know about them at all).

Thank you in advance.

Ian



Comments

by Michael Barnes

21:59 PM, 14th June 2015, About 7 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Joe Bloggs" at "14/06/2015 - 21:30":

If you want bold text, then precede it with <b> and follow it with </b>.

If you want italic text, then precede it with <i> and follow it with </i>.

by Joe Bloggs

22:37 PM, 14th June 2015, About 7 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Michael Barnes" at "14/06/2015 - 21:55":

hi michael,

that isnt what stephen stated.

and in any event if heating makes the condensation worse in this case, then it will make the condensation worse in all cases as condensation doesnt care whether the coldest surface is a roof soffit, window, cold pipe, water tank or external wall etc.

you have been misled and that is why it is important to correct..

by Joe Bloggs

22:40 PM, 14th June 2015, About 7 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Michael Barnes" at "14/06/2015 - 21:59":

thanks for tip! it works! however as involves more typing and thus time than going on caps lock will ctn. do upper case.

by Michael Barnes

23:23 PM, 14th June 2015, About 7 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Joe Bloggs" at "14/06/2015 - 22:40":

Once you've done it 6 or 7 times, you hardly notice it.

by Stephen Linley-Shaw

9:14 AM, 15th June 2015, About 7 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Joe Bloggs" at "14/06/2015 - 21:19":

Joe Bloggs.
AN APOLOGY for trying to make my comment too simplistic - you are right to correct me on the humidity/heat question. I should have said that a rise in heat will allow the air to carry more water vapour but it will TEMPORARILY reduce the humidity..... unfortunately by allowing the air to get wetter will make for MORE condensation if and when the temperature drops.
I would only advise clients to put up the heating if they were cold - not to defeat condensation.

INDEPENDENCE? Dryhomes is a totally independent partnership offering specialist advice and products to help customers combat condensation.

by Joe Bloggs

14:51 PM, 15th June 2015, About 7 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Stephen Linley-Shaw" at "15/06/2015 - 09:14":

hi stephen,

many thanks.

however im not sure we are totally still agreeing.

this is what i took issue to:
‘Heating the air more will allow the humidity to rise…..this adds to the problem!’

this is what i suggest you should have said:
‘Heating the air more will allow the humidity to rise, AND IF THE HEATING IS INTERMITTENT (THUS ALLOWING SURFACE TEMPERATURES TO FALL BELOW DEW POINT)…..this CAN adds to the problem IF VENTILATION IS INADEQUATE TO EXPELL THE MOISTURE LAIDEN AIR!’

the last thing any of us want are tenants who dont heat quoting advice that goes against all the recommendations and accepted wisdom. heat is part of a package of measures to defeat condensation as all the advice (including your own website from which you quoted) states.

by Stephen Linley-Shaw

9:07 AM, 16th June 2015, About 7 years ago

I concur.

My very last comment on this thread..........reduce humidity by

1 not generating water vapour - virtually impossible
2 condense it in a dehumidifier - expensive on energy
3 improve ventilation by introducing a 'dry' air flow - cheap and effective.PIV

Back ground heat and insulation both improve living conditions.

Many of our clients have found that once the humidity is controlled the air feels warmer and it is even possible to turn down the heat and feel just as comfortable as previously.

This has been a worthwhile debate.and I hope has helped landlords.

by Joe Bloggs

9:30 AM, 16th June 2015, About 7 years ago

Reply to the comment left by "Stephen Linley-Shaw" at "16/06/2015 - 09:07":

GOOD.

re 'Many of our clients have found that once the humidity is controlled the air feels warmer and it is even possible to turn down the heat and feel just as comfortable as previously.' IT IS AN ESTABLISHED FACT THAT HUMID AIR FEELS COLDER THAN ARID AIR OF THE SAME TEMPERATURE.

ESPECIALLY TAKING THIS INTO ACCOUNT I WOULDN'T SAY THAT DEHUMIDIFIERS ARE EXPENSIVE TO RUN.

by Mark Alexander

9:44 AM, 16th June 2015, About 7 years ago

Thank you Stephen and Joe for sharing your expertise in your comments, it has been educational.
.


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