Carbon monoxide alarms – balanced flue boilers?

Carbon monoxide alarms – balanced flue boilers?

9:16 AM, 22nd September 2022, About 4 days ago 15

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Hi Guys and Gals,

Can’t find a clear answer to “is a CO2 detector required for a modern balanced flue combination gas boiler installed in a purpose-built cupboard on a landing?”.

Some say yes and some say no.

The house in question, 10 years old, has a gas hob/electric oven in kitchen and gas boiler as above.

The flue goes up to the loft and exits out of house in the loft.

Thanks,

Dennis



Comments

David OBryan

13:11 PM, 23rd September 2022, About 3 days ago

Some People get mixed up with C0 and CO2

EECLondon

9:44 AM, 24th September 2022, About 2 days ago

In a private rented dwelling, you need a Carbon Monoxide detector (CO) in any room that contains solid fuel burning equipment (boilers, oil, stoves, log burners etc) except a cooker to comply with the regulations, in your situation I would also fit a detector if there were a bedroom below where a boiler is installed, it is unlikely a person would note the alarm if it installed in the attic. Your gas engineer should verify the satisfactory operation of safety devices that should include a Carbon Monoxide device and it is in date. You do not need a CO2 detector, that is Carbon Dioxide device unless it is for workplace environmental issues such as overcrowding in a space or assemblies.

Jessie Jones View Profile

10:02 AM, 24th September 2022, About 2 days ago

Reply to the comment left by EECLondon at 24/09/2022 - 09:44
EECLondon, your advise is out of date I'm afraid. New regs from 1st Oct extend the requirement to any habitable room containing a gas combustion device, such as a boiler, or gas fire with the exception of gas cookers or hobs. The initial question focuses on whether a cupboard is a habitable room or not.

PH

10:57 AM, 24th September 2022, About 2 days ago

My rental has a gas fire in the living room so there's an alarm in there within 3m of it.
The boiler is in the airing cupboard within the hallway so there's another alarm in the hallway within 3m of the boiler. Obviously the airing cupboard is not a habitable room but the boiler fumes could seep out into the hallway which is why I've put an alarm there. Better safe than sorry and for very little expense .My conscience is clear .

EECLondon

14:07 PM, 24th September 2022, About 2 days ago

Reply to the comment left by Jessie Jones at 24/09/2022 - 10:02
Extract Interpretation of the Gov web site.
Room
The regulations specifically stipulate that a hall or landing would be classed as a
room.
Room used wholly or partly as living accommodation:
The regulations require a smoke alarm to be installed on every storey of the premises
on which there is a room used wholly or partly as living accommodation.
A carbon monoxide alarm must be installed in any room which is used wholly or partly
as living accommodation and contains a fixed combustion appliance (except gas
cookers).
In general, a room is classed as ‘living accommodation’ if it is used for the primary
purposes of living, or is a room in which a person spends a significant amount of time.
The regulations specifically stipulate that a bathroom or lavatory would be classed as
living accommodation.
Therefore if a person was carrying out work on a heating system or other functional items that may be contained in a loft or attic then it should be protected.

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