NRLA want councils to use all of the powers at their disposal

NRLA want councils to use all of the powers at their disposal

9:59 AM, 10th February 2022, About 3 months ago 5

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New research published by the National Residential Landlords Association (NRLA) reveals that a majority of local authorities in England do not accurately record the number of private rented sector tenure complaints that they receive.

These NRLA findings, based on Freedom of Information Act requests, indicate that, in all, 56% of councils do not accurately record the number of complaints they receive concerning private rented sector housing. This figure rises to 61% for those local authorities which have selective licensing schemes.

Amongst those local authorities which did accurately record PRS complaints that they received, each of these councils dealt with an average of 274 complaints per year.

In all, councils conducted a total of just under 100,000 (98,858) inspections under the Housing, Health and Safety Rating System (HHRS) across England between 2018 to 2021. This roughly equates to just 1 in 45 private rented sector properties, according to our findings.

Our research also shows how the recording of these inspections is not consistent across local authorities, with many councils failing to register any of their inspections.

According to our findings, a mere 1% of HHSRS inspections resulted in a follow-up prosecution, with 4% of improvement notices resulting in the imposition of a civil penalty.

Chris Norris, Director, Policy & Campaigns, at the National Residential Landlords Association, said:

“What is needed in order to build a private rented sector which is fair and inclusive for all, is for councils to use all of the powers at their disposal.

“These figures show that there is a long way to go before councils deal effectively with the rogue landlords who bring the sector into disrepute.

“Until councils adopt a more effective approach towards recordkeeping, it will be impossible for them to take the steps necessary to enforce regulations.”



Comments

by Luke P

10:28 AM, 10th February 2022, About 3 months ago

Councils will not stop asking for more tools until they're in a position to be judge & jury with absolute power.

They quite literally want to be able to say, "I don't like you attitude, landlord...£30,000 fine for you!" Or, "This property, whilst totally safe and fully compliant, is a little...hmm...drab, so a Rent Repayment Order is coming your way!"

Yes, it's hard and takes a lot of time/effort/evidence to hold people to account...but that's what's necessary in an open and fair society when someone's freedoms or livelihood is on the line. The police regularly know an individual is guilty of a crime, but they still have to jump through all the hoops of collating evidence, conducting interviews, putting together a file and spending hundreds of man-hours investigating. Then there's the lengthy delays for Court dates...it's not all that dissimilar to what LLs have to, as the Council and society would say are reasonable steps, go through when evicting a tenant. So why then do you think you should just make emotional decisions on a whim based almost entirely within the politics of envy??

Not long until I leave this industry and I can watch the entire sector implode. Local authorities seem to forget that we private landlords can simply exit whenever the hell suits us, whereas they'll never be able to absolve themselves of their responsibility to house tenants. Good luck once the PRS has disappeared. I'll be on a beach somewhere!

by Ian Narbeth

10:46 AM, 10th February 2022, About 3 months ago

I do wonder whether the NRLA knows what it is doing.
"According to our findings, a mere 1% of HHSRS inspections resulted in a follow-up prosecution, with 4% of improvement notices resulting in the imposition of a civil penalty." So what? The "mere" numbers prove nothing except perhaps that 99% of inspections resulted in no need for a prosecution.
“What is needed in order to build a private rented sector which is fair and inclusive for all, is for councils to use all of the powers at their disposal." Complete non sequitur. What is needed is assistance, training, encouragement and the exercise of reasonable discretion. Using "all of the powers at their disposal" means prosecuting every minor infraction fully which is oppressive.
“These figures show that there is a long way to go before councils deal effectively with the rogue landlords who bring the sector into disrepute." Again a non sequitur. The figures themselves don't prove it. Miss out the first four words and the sentence may be true.
“Until councils adopt a more effective approach towards recordkeeping, it will be impossible for them to take the steps necessary to enforce regulations.” Please produce some evidence. Unless you have a massive housing department where housing officers don't talk to each other, the officers generally know who the rogue landlords are. Requiring them to maintain even more records of all the cases that don't merit action will likely distract the officers from doing their jobs.

by Luke P

12:39 PM, 10th February 2022, About 3 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Ian Narbeth at 10/02/2022 - 10:46
The NRLA are, I'm almost entirely convinced, a Government 'plant'. I'd suggest the vast vast majority of their membership is purely there for their advice line and forms. But the cross this over into support for their (weak, misguided) lobbying...as a stooge organisation.

by Dylan Morris

12:42 PM, 10th February 2022, About 3 months ago

Is the NRLA part of the Labour Party ?

by Ofer Moses

13:32 PM, 10th February 2022, About 3 months ago

Reply to the comment left by Luke P at 10/02/2022 - 10:28This is not about rogue landlords, this is about The PRS and PRS Landlords.
All groups voicing their concerns against the PRS (Shelter, Generation rent, NRLA, etc) want landlords to be liable for the investments and risks they take and offer their property on a non profit basis.
It's worth pointing out that Tennants are not forced to rent, this is their contractual choice.
If it is suggested that renters have little or no choice, what options would they have without the existence of the PRS that they don't already have?


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