Disrepairs – What do Councils look for?

by Readers Question

11:33 AM, 18th April 2018
About 7 months ago

Disrepairs – What do Councils look for?

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Disrepairs – What do Councils look for?

Does anyone have experience of the most common items found by local authorities under the heading “general disrepairs” when properties are inspected in Selective Licensing areas?

It would be good to know what in particular they are looking for and the experiences of other Landlords that have had an inspection.

Many thanks

David



Comments

Chris Daniel

16:29 PM, 18th April 2018
About 7 months ago

You can find this on the English Housing Survey,
mainly, its Energy efficiency and Condensation & mold ( many of which will be lifestyle related )

Mick Roberts

8:17 AM, 19th April 2018
About 7 months ago

Watch out for trip hazards ie. carpet loose when it's not even your carpet, yet u have to pay as they put the trip hazard down to the Landlords fault.

Get tenant to sign u letter saying their carpets

Mandy Thomson

11:01 AM, 19th April 2018
About 7 months ago

Following Brown v Hyndburn in the Court of Appeal, a local authority will be ultra vires if it tries to impose conditions above and beyond current national legislation. I recently came across at least one local authority which was forced to revise its pending scheme in the light of this.

The problem is that sometimes councils send out poorly or even non trained staff to carry out inspections who are imposing their own (ill informed) opinions and only have a tick sheet based on the HHSRS to guide them.

If a local authority tries to impose licensing conditions that seem unreasonable, it is best to challenge (starting with the council officer's superiors).

I once attended an introductory HHSRS course with David Princep. His advice was for landlords to go all the way to the First Tier Property Tribunal if despite complaints, a council was insisting on imposing unreasonable conditions. He said that in his experience many will simply back down at this point as the burden is on them to prove their conditions are reasonable, which takes considerable time, money and expertise.


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