English Housing Survey 2018-19 released

by Property 118

11:47 AM, 23rd January 2020
About 4 weeks ago

English Housing Survey 2018-19 released

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English Housing Survey 2018-19 released

The Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government has today released the English Housing Survey 2018-19. Click here to download the headlines report. First run in 1967, it is a national survey of people’s housing circumstances and the condition and energy efficiency of housing in England.

The Main findings of the report show:

The proportion of households in the private rented sector remains unchanged for the sixth year in a row and the proportion of households in the social rented sector has not changed for more than a decade.

In 2018-19, the private rented sector accounted for 4.6 million or 19% of households. Throughout the 1980s and 1990s, the proportion of private rented households was steady at around 10%. While the sector has doubled in size since 2002, the rate has hovered around 19 to 20% since 2013-14.

The social rented sector, at 4.0 million households (17%), remained the smallest tenure, following a long downward trend which has stabilised over the last decade or so. However, the composition of the social rented sector has changed in recent years. In 2008-09, the social rented sector accounted for 18% of households with 9% (2.0 million) renting from housing associations and 9% (1.9 million) renting from local authorities. In 2018-19, 10% (2.4 million) rented from housing associations and 7% (1.6 million) from local authorities.

After more than a decade of decline, the proportion of 25-34 year olds in owner occupation has increased and there are now almost equal proportions of 25-34 year olds living in the private rented and owner occupied sectors.

In 2018-19, 41% of those aged 25-34 lived in the private rented sector; a further 41% were owner occupiers.

Between 2003-04 and 2013-14, the proportion of 25-34 year olds in owner occupation decreased from 59% to 36%. Since then, the proportion of owner occupiers aged 25-34 has increased to 41%. Meanwhile, the proportion of 25-34 year olds in the private rented sector declined from its peak at 48% in 2013-14 to 41% in 2018-19.

Over the last decade, the proportion of people aged 55-64 living in the rented sectors has increased.

In 2018-19, 10% of 55-64 year olds lived in the private rented sector, up from 7% in 2008-09. Over the same period, the proportion of 55-64 year olds in the social rented sector increased from 14% to 17%. Meanwhile, the proportion of 55-64 year olds that were owner occupiers decreased from 79% to 73%.

In the last 20 years, overcrowding has increased in the rented sectors, and remains at the highest rate it has ever been in the social rented sector.

In 2018-19, 8% of social renters lived in overcrowded accommodation, up from 5% in 1998-99. Over the same period, the proportion of private renters living in overcrowded accommodation increased from 3% to 6%.

Overcrowding is less prevalent among owner occupiers, 1% of whom live in overcrowded accommodation.

Over the last decade, the proportion of non-decent homes has declined.

In 2008, 33% of the stock was non-decent. This has fallen to 18% in 2018. This decrease was observed across all tenures but has stalled in recent years.

There remains a lower proportion of non-decent homes in the social sector than in the private rented and owner occupied sectors.

In 2018, 12% of dwellings in the social rented sector failed to meet the Decent Homes Standard. This is lower than the proportion of private rented (25%) and owner occupied (17%) homes.

Across all tenures, the proportion of homes with HHSRS Category 1 hazards has declined over the past decade.

In 2018, 11% of the housing stock had a HHSRS Category 1 hazard, down from 23% in 2008. Such hazards are more prevalent in the private rented sector (14%) than owner occupied housing stock (11%) and the social rented sector (5%).

While the private rented sector had the highest proportion of homes with a Category 1 hazard, there was a notable decrease in the proportion of stock with such hazards, from 31% in 2008 to 14% in 2018.

The energy efficiency of English homes has increased considerably over the last 20 years, but slowed in recent years. In 2018 there was an improvement in almost all tenures.

In 2018, the average SAP rating of English dwellings was 63 points, up from 62 points in 2017. This increase was evident in all tenures apart from housing association dwellings where there was no significant increase.

The proportion of dwellings in the highest SAP energy efficiency rating (EER) bands A to C increased considerably between 2008 and 2018, from 9% to 34%. Over the same period, the proportion of dwellings in the lowest F and G bands fel l from 14% to 4%

 

 



Comments

Neil Patterson

11:51 AM, 23rd January 2020
About 4 weeks ago

Andy Sommerville, Director at Search Acumen, commented:

“The housing ladder needs some more rungs. It’s all very well saying that anyone can buy but when the percentage of homeowners has stood still since 2013 it seems clear navigating the housing ladder is too precarious for most people to do so safely.

“Everyone is affected by the lack of suitable housing. From those who bought before starting families who now find themselves trapped in homes too small for their needs, to the social housing sector where overcrowding remains at its highest ever level.

“We need more housing and we need to make moving less burdensome – financially and emotionally. To do that we have to embrace the digitisation of integral conveyancing processes and that requires more open data. Bricks and mortar are a far cry from big data and algorithms but if we are serious about solving the housing crisis, we need to see greater commitment from both public and private sectors to unite them.”

Neil Patterson

11:53 AM, 23rd January 2020
About 4 weeks ago

Director of lettings and sale agent, Marc von Grundherr, commented:
“Despite all that we hear of the plight of the first time buyer, it seems that statistically speaking they’ve rarely had it so good.
Homeownership amongst youngsters is on the up and no doubt heavily influenced by Help to Buy, record-low mortgage rates and the Bank of Mum and Dad.
Either that or perhaps millennials have heeded the advice of consumer experts and some estate agents and have indeed cut back on avocados and trips to Ibiza, saving their earnings for a home purchase instead.
The even better news is that foot soldiers of Extinction Rebellion can now unglue themselves from various items of London transport, because housing, one of the biggest climate change protagonists, is officially significantly less harmful to the planet than a decade ago. This means that we don’t need to switch our central heating off just yet in order to placate Greta & Co.”


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