Yvonne Francis

Registered with Property118.com
Monday 3rd August 2015


Latest Comments

Total Number of Property118 Comments: 141

Yvonne Francis

19:16 PM, 30th April 2019
About 2 months ago

S21 ban: Should straightforward possession cases be decided out of court?

Reply to the comment left by Dr Rosalind Beck at 30/04/2019 - 15:10
I just do not understand why abolishing section 21 abolishes any fixed period of tenancy, and what do you mean by section 21 'eclipsing' the three year tenancy. Have you any useful links to what you seem to be saying.

It is very clear to me that tenancies at the moment have a period where neither side can give notice. Section 21, I presume can be used by landlords after that fixed period, and the change would be that landlords after that period could no longer be able to end a tenancy under 'no fault' or whatever, except on certain very restrictive conditions.

However I realise in three year tenancies the tenant can at any time give notice, and not the landlord, except on restrictive conditions. Are you not trying to overlap the two? They are only looking to abolish section 21 and not bring in three year tenancies yet.

Mandy, in Scotland where they do have three year tenancies student letting is all over except for the shouting!... Read More

Yvonne Francis

15:01 PM, 30th April 2019
About 2 months ago

S21 ban: Should straightforward possession cases be decided out of court?

Reply to the comment left by Dr Rosalind Beck at 30/04/2019 - 08:17Correct me if I am wrong Ross, but if section 21 is abolished then surly a fixed term period is not also abolished where neither the tenant or the landlord can give notice? If this is the case then no student could give notice ‘willy-nilly’. I believe a fixed term can be twelve months?
A greater problem is students staying on. Ian gives good advice when he mentions jointly and severally liable leases. I don’t have provision for section 21 in my student tenancies. I have let for 40 years and have never needed it. My houses are large, so the possibility of every one staying on, on a jointly and severally liable lease, is small. Added to which, I mostly let to friends of previous tenants at the same college. I once let for 20 years non-stop, to the same college. Blocking the access of students they know would not be a comfortable situation!
My greatest worry is, if we have three year leases. I could never rent, as I do, in November for the following summer. If notice was given in mid to late summer the likelihood of finding students to take their place in the summer would be very difficult indeed. The student market would be just a no-no.... Read More

Yvonne Francis

18:06 PM, 1st April 2019
About 3 months ago

Am I in HMO territory?

Reply to the comment left by Rob Crawford at 01/04/2019 - 15:36
Yes Rob, you are right. I am muddling up households as individuals as clearly a HMO is two households as indicated in the second point. I am used to dealing with unrelated individuals and was classing the cohabiting couple as one individual. Must still say I still personally would not go there if I was Dylan!... Read More

Yvonne Francis

14:51 PM, 1st April 2019
About 3 months ago

Am I in HMO territory?

Dylan is quite right to wonder if 3 people constitute a HMO. In my area and lots of others, it is down to 3. However if you have a co-habiting couple, if I interpret my Council correctly then it’s; ’marriage or equivalent co-habiting arrangements’ (see link). So under the suggested arrangement, I think this tenancy would not fall under the classification of a HMO.

If it was me, if I had a flat that could be let to a family I would choose that option. With the suggested option the situation could change and I know from experience that it is best to avoid being a HMO, whether it needs a license or not.

If you are determined to go ahead it is best to contact your Council. in person or online, as rules vary and they can give you proper information.

https://www.oxford.gov.uk/info/20113/houses_in_multiple_occupation/926/properties_that_need_a_hmo_licence... Read More

Yvonne Francis

13:28 PM, 26th March 2019
About 3 months ago

Who is responsible for paying for a lock on HMO bedroom door?

Reply to the comment left by Ian Narbeth at 25/03/2019 - 10:38
Ian, I don’t think you have made it very clear on ‘shared’ HMO’s. Your council clearly say, ‘stable, cohesive group of sharers’ are exempt from locks on individual rooms. This is best looked at by the type of lease. A ‘cohesive group of sharers’ in a HMO would have a joint and severally liable lease, giving all the tenants the run of the house, so no entitlement to locks on individual rooms, while others HMO’s may be let on a room by room individual lease, and therefore entitled to thumb turn locks on their individual rooms. In the original post Rachael says that her room was let on an individual lease, so she was entitled to a thumb turn lock and the landlord was quite out of order telling her she had to fit one.

I have student houses let on a joint and severally liable lease. I make it very clear I do not want locks on my bedroom doors. The only question I have been asked is insurance. Some of my tenants have been turned down for insurance of their personal possessions due to this issue. I always advise them to go to Endsleigh, as they are specialist, and know exactly the position of these types of shared houses on jointly and severally leases. They are only interested in external locks which rather confirms the matter... Read More