Ollie Cornes

Registered with Property118.com
Thursday 4th July 2013


Latest Comments

Total Number of Property118 Comments: 33

Ollie Cornes

18:49 PM, 26th January 2018
About 3 years ago

Leaseholders may now have to pay more for extensions or purchasing the Freehold

Reply to the comment left by Ed Tuff at 26/01/2018 - 14:48
The clock stops when you serve the section 42 notice (and pay a 10% deposit) which demonstrates your intention to extend the lease. You can only serve the notice after 2yrs ownership, but you can engage a solicitor before that date so they can serve it on the first day you have owned the property for two years. To serve the notice you will normally need a leasehold valuation survey done first and that is another reason to start sooner rather than later. I have used Mari Knowles at Leasehold Law (associated with Louie Burns, quoted above) to do more than one lease extension and recommend her. Climb mountains to get it done before the lease length drops below 80 years. It may be expensive, but much less so than waiting.... Read More

Ollie Cornes

7:37 AM, 25th March 2015
About 6 years ago

Selective Licensing Consultations

Mandy, you may wish to contact Richard Blanco at the NLA.... Read More

Ollie Cornes

14:15 PM, 26th November 2014
About 6 years ago

Selective Licensing Consultations

There's an NLA piece about licensing in the Ilford local paper where Redbridge are pressing ahead with their stupid scheme.

http://www.ilfordrecorder.co.uk/news/tenants_will_suffer_from_redbridge_council_s_licence_plan_landlords_1_3862570... Read More

Ollie Cornes

10:30 AM, 24th November 2014
About 6 years ago

Selective Licensing Consultations

That is a pragmatic and I suspect effective series of steps Mark. The bit councils seem to miss is that requiring all landlords to register does not mean all landlords will register and actually the ones that they most need to register are the ones most likely to not bother. It is steps like your number nine that have not been considered and which will be more effective, as they make it increasingly difficult for rogues to operate. Unless councils can identify, inspect and enforce against the really dreadful landlords & properties any regulation is a failure.... Read More

Ollie Cornes

10:12 AM, 24th November 2014
About 6 years ago

Selective Licensing Consultations

Yes, fines go centrally, which needs to change. If councils can produce some revenue from prosecutions it gives them a reason to enforce against the rogues. Currently most don't do very much.

I understand your argument about resources,and to a degree I agree with you, but unless they raise more funds somewhere they have to cut some other service to enforce more against landlords. Some might argue why take funds from these other areas to enforce against landlords, THEY should pay (which is probably how we ended up here). If fines went to the council that problem goes away. The fines should also be a lot higher - especially where the breaches relate to health/safety and the landlord has refused to resolve them.

I actively support drastically more enforcement than happens now, but I think rogues should pay. Tenants need more protection from rogues, and good landlords benefit from a broad raising of standards, closing down the crappier end of the market.... Read More