Sue J

Registered with Property118.com
Monday 27th October 2014


Latest Comments

Total Number of Property118 Comments: 8

Sue J

9:53 AM, 31st March 2020
About A year ago

Lodger rights at the current time?

Reply to the comment left by Neil Patterson at 30/03/2020 - 13:28
Hi Marie
My understanding is that if the lodger is a licensee (shares your home with you including kitchen shared facilities and it is not in an 'independant' flat/unit with its own washing/kitchen facilities) then you can ask them to leave on short notice. Whether you would want to do that or not will depend on why you would want to give quick notice. The governments recent advice appears to be covering AST tenancies and not licensees. Licensees have always had reduced rights but you need to be certain that they 'live' with you rather totally separately. My advice is to check out with a solicitor how the tenant/licensee lives currently with you first before doing anything. I am not a solicitor so please be aware that any advice is based only on the last 35 years experience in the housing market but we are facing a moving target at the moment so get everything covered by good legal advice as it will save you months of later wrangling if you get it wrong! Good luck and keep safe out there.... Read More

Sue J

9:33 AM, 19th March 2020
About A year ago

No Rent For Buy To Let Landlords

For HMO properties there is even more financial strain as all bills are covered within the rents. If help is extended to buy to let mortgages (and my mortgage company Kent Reliance doesn't seem to be aware of any help as of yesterday) the substantial utility/service bills for the HMO's are likely to cause defaults. If services such as lighting heating or wifi's etc go off where do we stand. I am not a limited company, my properties are my only income and my bank considers my income as a 'business' although the government or tax man does not. I therefore cannot get any extension on my overdraft as my bank's 'rules' allows no 'special exceptions' for covid 19!! I am now facing a situation of tenants racking up higher bills as they stay home and no income means no money to cover bills. I have long felt that HMO's should have always been considered businesses with separate tenancy agreements set aside due to the differences in management. If that had been the case any 'businesses' effected would have been covered. If tenants have further protections on evictions then the pain is higher. If I can't cover everything which I won't I will have to default and the outcome to the tenants will be evictions by the mortgage company under the only remaining facility which ironically protects the financial bodies who we all bailed out when 'they' had their crisis!!... Read More

Sue J

11:52 AM, 8th May 2015
About 6 years ago

Out on my ear after 25 years

Hi Nicola

It's always difficult moving after such a long period of time and I appreciate that after 25 years you will have accumulated quite a lot of items and there is never an ideal time in which to sort them out.

You have not advised us if your Landlord has advised you if they are selling the property of wishing to change something within the building which might not include retaining a residential part as before. Provided they have carried out the necessary notices which it seems they have, they are entitled to give notice and to take the property back. This is a 'no fault' right so you should not take this personally as they have the rights within the tenancy agreement to end the tenancy at the end of the term.

I'm not sure why you would consider that the landlord should compensate you for your having to move house. They are only responsible for your current tenancy environment and not for any move which you will need to make should they decide to take their property back.

I would suggest that if you have been a good tenant and have been making the payments as described that your reference will reflect this for another Landlord and you should see this as an asset you have to offer when finding another property to rent.

Can I also suggest that you contact your local housing office at the council who may be able to advise you about any help or assistance which might be available with the move with your disabled son.... Read More

Sue J

12:40 PM, 21st April 2015
About 6 years ago

Late, unexpected and excessive service charges

Hi Mark,

I think you need to find out what the 'unexpected' expenditure is within those figures you have given, only then can you target your enquiries to the managing agents. Your lease will set out how the service charge is to be apportioned between the properties contributing and you might just check to make sure that the correct allocation of costs are being made. Do you have a sinking or reserve fund (what I describe to people as a rainy day fund) which is collected within the service charge? I have often seen this fund being taken out and this leaves the leaseholder open to the spikes in expenditure which occur as the properties age?... Read More

Sue J

11:52 AM, 21st April 2015
About 6 years ago

Late, unexpected and excessive service charges

Hi Mark,

What did they project for the budget during that year for those items? Do you pay a set managment fee or a percentage? If a percentage there is no incentive to make sure that the service charge is kept within reasonable levels. Its difficult to assess the costs you have given without the information regarding the age, size complexity of the block or blocks your flats occupy. Some info would help.... Read More