Ian Muir

Registered with Property118.com
Monday 23rd October 2017

Trading Status
Sole Owner

Providing essential rental accommodation since
2005

Insures properties through a broker recommended by Property118
No


Latest Comments

Total Number of Property118 Comments: 4

Ian Muir

11:50 AM, 28th November 2017
About 3 years ago

M&S Food for Shelter

Reply to the comment left by Dr Rosalind Beck at 27/11/2017 - 21:28
If the public believe that Shelter is doing good, then that will suit corporations who want to be perceived as contributing to the community. Especially when it's apparent that Gvmt is influenced by them.
If you believe that the public perception is wrong then you have to find a way to inform them of the facts.
Complaining as landlords will only just elicit the response that "they would say that wouldn't they", and who will support landlord's opinions?

To break that perception by corporations and the electorate, factual statistics about how Shelter (mis)uses money (or eg their Chief Exec abuses his expenses or some other scandal that newspapers can use as an "outrage"), and the effects on PRS housing as a DIRECT result of Shelter's activities would be needed.

Anyone know a supportive journalist / newspaper prepared to take a stance in conflict with general opinion?

Anyone have statistics (and sources) to back up the negative effects of Shelter's activities?... Read More

Ian Muir

12:45 PM, 13th November 2017
About 3 years ago

Labour Councils Teach Us How To Invest In Commercial Property !

Reply to the comment left by Ian Narbeth at 13/11/2017 - 10:51
I had assumed that they bought an asset rather than shares. This would surely have incurred CGT?... Read More

Ian Muir

9:31 AM, 13th November 2017
About 3 years ago

Labour Councils Teach Us How To Invest In Commercial Property !

Reply to the comment left by Baker Street Property Meet at 09/11/2017 - 16:27
My understanding was similar, that when offshore assets owned by a UK business are sold, the proceeds could not be brought back into the UK without being taxed.

So it looks like an interesting angle that they may have found to mitigate tax, but without previously knowing about the case, I do not understand why they are investing in offshore assets when it's fair to assume they have no expertise in this or indeed any area of investment.... Read More

Ian Muir

15:36 PM, 6th November 2017
About 3 years ago

Was the Base Rate increase an overreaction?

It will be interesting to see how their projected international interest rates compares to reality. Do they really believe that interest rates will be pushed up when Gvmts are so massively in debt, and cannot afford current repayments?

As for the rise in global oil prices, the reality is that petrol prices have hardly moved.
Productivity? Well that's another set of obscure statistics that Ive enquired about and failed to get an answer to; exactly how they are actually calculated, what is a working day, hours worked, who is included (part-time?), what industries, holidays etc and are the stats produced exactly the same way for each country?

Statistics appear to be little more than a justification for Gvmts to hide the real problem - debt. I would like to see stats for anticipated interest rates if Deutsche Bank crashed (it apparently has derivative exposure that is 20 times Germanys GDP), or the Italian banks, or another Greece crisis (a certainty). In these events, Gvmts can only react to the markets and currently risk of sovereign default is not factored into interest rates (Greece is a 100% certainty of default, so why does anyone lend at 7%?). Once risk is factored in (its a certainty that Europe, UK, USA, Japan cannot repay their debts and will have to default) then interest rates will shoot up, irrespective of what Gvmts and central bankers say.

Personally I wouldn't rely on Gvmt statistics or central bankers/"economists" projections for making decisions on affordability. Being able to raise money at very short notice will be crucial in order to avoid a business-crushing spike in interest rates, even just to the long-term mean of 6-7%, let alone to the 15% rates we suffered in the late 80's-90's .... Read More